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Thread: Brining meat

  1. #1
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Brining meat

    Why is it common to brine pork and poultry, but not beef?
    --
    Barb,
    http://www.barbschaller.com, as of August 20, 2012

  2. #2
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Brining meat

    On Oct 6, 12:58*pm, Melba's Jammin' <barbschal...@earthlink.net>
    wrote:
    > Why is it common to brine pork and poultry, but not beef?
    > --
    > Barb,http://www.barbschaller.com, as of August 20, 2012


    You can brine beef. Depends on what you want to do with it.
    I 'dry' brine my steaks and roasts. I rub them generously with salt
    and black pepper and let them come
    to room temperature before cooking them. You can dry brine in the
    refrigerator for a couple of days if you
    want.


  3. #3
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: Brining meat


    Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >
    > Why is it common to brine pork and poultry, but not beef?


    It is, see Mal-Wart "enhanced" beef...

  4. #4
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Re: Brining meat


    On 6-Oct-2012, Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Why is it common to brine pork and poultry, but not beef?
    > --
    > Barb,
    > http://www.barbschaller.com, as of August 20, 2012

    What I think I learned from America's Test Kitchen Radio over the past few
    years:
    Chicken and pork have less fat in the muscle than beef; brining makes up for
    the lack of fat by retaining moisture. Even very lean beef cuts have more
    fat than chicken or pork; however, some lean beef cuts can benefit from
    brining but it is not as necessary as in the other meats.
    --

    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  5. #5
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Brining meat

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >
    >Why is it common to brine pork and poultry, but not beef?


    It's more common to brine beef.
    Corned beef.
    Sauerbratten.
    It's more common than all the rest together to brine fish.

  6. #6
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Brining meat

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

    > Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > >
    > >Why is it common to brine pork and poultry, but not beef?

    >
    > It's more common to brine beef.
    > Corned beef.
    > Sauerbratten.
    > It's more common than all the rest together to brine fish.


    Corned beef, eh? Didn't know that.
    I thought about sauerbraten when I posted -- but that's marinating, not
    brining.
    Yeah, saltwater fish lives in brine. :-P
    --
    Barb,
    http://www.barbschaller.com, as of August 20, 2012

  7. #7
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Brining meat

    In article <50709242$1$26884$[email protected] >,
    "Pete C." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > >
    > > Why is it common to brine pork and poultry, but not beef?

    >
    > It is, see Mal-Wart "enhanced" beef...


    Barf. That's why I refuse to buy Hormel fresh meats. I'll be damned if
    I'll pay 30% of the cost of a pork tenderloin for what is tantamount to
    a salt water solution.
    --
    Barb,
    http://www.barbschaller.com, as of August 20, 2012

  8. #8
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Brining meat

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    ImStillMags <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Oct 6, 12:58*pm, Melba's Jammin' <barbschal...@earthlink.net>
    > wrote:
    > > Why is it common to brine pork and poultry, but not beef?
    > > --
    > > Barb,http://www.barbschaller.com, as of August 20, 2012

    >
    > You can brine beef. Depends on what you want to do with it.
    > I 'dry' brine my steaks and roasts. I rub them generously with salt
    > and black pepper and let them come
    > to room temperature before cooking them. You can dry brine in the
    > refrigerator for a couple of days if you
    > want.


    Isn't "dry brine" kind of a foofoo made up term for "rub"? I'm talking
    about soaking a chunk of meat in a salt water solution for a several
    hours or longer before draining and cooking it.
    --
    Barb,
    http://www.barbschaller.com, as of August 20, 2012

  9. #9
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Brining meat

    On Sat, 06 Oct 2012 14:58:02 -0500, Melba's Jammin' wrote:

    > Why is it common to brine pork and poultry, but not beef?


    Beef and lamb are the only meats with flavor. Today's White meats
    needs help.

    Look at those Brits that salted and boiled their beefs - they used to
    have flavor, too.

    -sw

  10. #10
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Brining meat

    Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Isn't "dry brine" kind of a foofoo made up term for "rub"?


    A-yep. Bogus terminology, but not necessarily a bogus technique.
    I dry rub a few things, mainly pork ribs, brisket, and lamb kebobs.

    Whereas I (wet) brine pork chops, and sometimes when appropriate, fish.

    I have not gotten into brining birds so there I have no knowledge.


    Steve

  11. #11
    The Other Guy Guest

    Default Re: Brining meat

    On Sat, 06 Oct 2012 23:18:11 -0500, Melba's Jammin'
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >
    >> Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >> >
    >> >Why is it common to brine pork and poultry, but not beef?

    >>
    >> It's more common to brine beef.
    >> Corned beef.
    >> Sauerbratten.
    >> It's more common than all the rest together to brine fish.

    >
    >Corned beef, eh? Didn't know that.


    And, of course, pastrami.






    To reply by email, lose the Ks...


  12. #12
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Brining meat

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >
    > Barf. That's why I refuse to buy Hormel fresh meats. I'll be damned if
    > I'll pay 30% of the cost of a pork tenderloin for what is tantamount to
    > a salt water solution.


    You might find this interesting. Way back when I was married, the wife
    bought a Hormel brined ham. We had had this before and it was good. This
    one though, they forgot to soak all the salt out of it before packaging.
    She cooked it and it was WAY too salty.

    None of the family could eat it except for me. I like salty things so I ate
    it all myself, even thought it was a bit salty for me too.

    Anyway, she wrote to the company and complained about the salt content.
    They wrote her back with apologies and sent her a coupon for a replacement
    ham.

    She used the coupon to get a 2nd one for free and this one was good like it
    should be. So she wrote them back again, thanking them for the replacement,
    and told them how we all loved it.

    They wrote her back, thanking her for the postitive review, and sent still
    another coupon for a free one just because of the postitive feedback.

    So...we got buy one(too salty) get two more good ones for free.

    G.

  13. #13
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Brining meat

    The Other Guy wrote:
    >
    > On Sat, 06 Oct 2012 23:18:11 -0500, Melba's Jammin'
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> >Why is it common to brine pork and poultry, but not beef?
    > >>
    > >> It's more common to brine beef.
    > >> Corned beef.
    > >> Sauerbratten.
    > >> It's more common than all the rest together to brine fish.

    > >
    > >Corned beef, eh? Didn't know that.

    >
    > And, of course, pastrami.


    And also....."corned" is another word for "brined in salt water."

    G.

  14. #14
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Brining meat

    On Sun, 07 Oct 2012 08:06:30 -0400, Gary <[email protected]> wrote:

    >The Other Guy wrote:
    >>
    >> On Sat, 06 Oct 2012 23:18:11 -0500, Melba's Jammin'
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> >In article <[email protected]>,
    >> > Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >> >> >
    >> >> >Why is it common to brine pork and poultry, but not beef?
    >> >>
    >> >> It's more common to brine beef.
    >> >> Corned beef.
    >> >> Sauerbratten.
    >> >> It's more common than all the rest together to brine fish.
    >> >
    >> >Corned beef, eh? Didn't know that.

    >>
    >> And, of course, pastrami.

    >
    >And also....."corned" is another word for "brined in salt water."


    Pastrami is essentially smoked corned beef.
    Btw, brined in salt water is an oxymoron.

  15. #15
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Brining meat

    On Sat, 06 Oct 2012 23:18:11 -0500, Melba's Jammin'
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >
    >> Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >> >
    >> >Why is it common to brine pork and poultry, but not beef?

    >>
    >> It's more common to brine beef.
    >> Corned beef.
    >> Sauerbratten.
    >> It's more common than all the rest together to brine fish.

    >
    >Corned beef, eh? Didn't know that.
    >I thought about sauerbraten when I posted -- but that's marinating, not
    >brining.


    Corned beef is marinated too. However soaking meat in plain salted
    watrer is also marinating... it's just that usually one wants to add
    flavors at the same time. Brining is a form of food presevation is
    all. Some stupidmarket meats are injected with brine only to extend
    shelf life is all.

    >Yeah, saltwater fish lives in brine. :-P


    Hehe, I bet you enjoy brining eel.

  16. #16
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Brining meat

    On Sat, 06 Oct 2012 23:19:25 -0500, Melba's Jammin'
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <50709242$1$26884$[email protected] >,
    > "Pete C." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >> >
    >> > Why is it common to brine pork and poultry, but not beef?

    >>
    >> It is, see Mal-Wart "enhanced" beef...

    >
    >Barf. That's why I refuse to buy Hormel fresh meats. I'll be damned if
    >I'll pay 30% of the cost of a pork tenderloin for what is tantamount to
    >a salt water solution.


    Actually the brine doesn't add weight, brine displaces an equal volume
    of water that's naturally in meat (meat is like 80% water)... often a
    too concentrated brine will reduce the weight of meat. You're not
    geting cheated on the weight, you're getting cheated on freshness...
    brined meat is not fresh meat. I really don't understand how they can
    get away with selling injected meat along with fresh meat but somehow
    they do, probably because not enough people complain... all folks need
    do is stop buying it and it will disappear. The meat people brine
    meat for one reason only, it greatly extends shelf life. Butter is
    salted for exactly the same reason, and I bet you happily buy salted
    butter, so be quiet.

  17. #17
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Brining meat

    On Sun, 07 Oct 2012 12:20:25 -0400, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

    >On Sat, 06 Oct 2012 23:19:25 -0500, Melba's Jammin'
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>In article <50709242$1$26884$[email protected] >,
    >> "Pete C." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >>> >
    >>> > Why is it common to brine pork and poultry, but not beef?
    >>>
    >>> It is, see Mal-Wart "enhanced" beef...

    >>
    >>Barf. That's why I refuse to buy Hormel fresh meats. I'll be damned if
    >>I'll pay 30% of the cost of a pork tenderloin for what is tantamount to
    >>a salt water solution.

    >
    >Actually the brine doesn't add weight, brine displaces an equal volume
    >of water that's naturally in meat (meat is like 80% water)... often a
    >too concentrated brine will reduce the weight of meat. You're not
    >geting cheated on the weight, you're getting cheated on freshness...
    >brined meat is not fresh meat. I really don't understand how they can
    >get away with selling injected meat along with fresh meat but somehow
    >they do, probably because not enough people complain... all folks need
    >do is stop buying it and it will disappear. The meat people brine
    >meat for one reason only, it greatly extends shelf life. Butter is
    >salted for exactly the same reason, and I bet you happily buy salted
    >butter, so be quiet.


    Injected meat is a whole different thing than brining. With
    injection, you are actually adding liquid to the meat. With brining,
    there is an exchange. IMO
    Janet US

  18. #18
    The Other Guy Guest

    Default Re: Brining meat

    On Sun, 07 Oct 2012 12:04:19 -0400, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

    >On Sun, 07 Oct 2012 08:06:30 -0400, Gary <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>The Other Guy wrote:
    >>>
    >>> On Sat, 06 Oct 2012 23:18:11 -0500, Melba's Jammin'
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> >In article <[email protected]>,
    >>> > Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >>> >
    >>> >> Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >>> >> >
    >>> >> >Why is it common to brine pork and poultry, but not beef?
    >>> >>
    >>> >> It's more common to brine beef.
    >>> >> Corned beef.
    >>> >> Sauerbratten.
    >>> >> It's more common than all the rest together to brine fish.
    >>> >
    >>> >Corned beef, eh? Didn't know that.
    >>>
    >>> And, of course, pastrami.

    >>
    >>And also....."corned" is another word for "brined in salt water."

    >
    >Pastrami is essentially smoked corned beef.


    Pastrami is peppered rather than using corned beef spices,
    totally different taste.






    To reply by email, lose the Ks...


  19. #19
    George Guest

    Default Re: Brining meat

    On 10/7/2012 12:48 PM, Janet Bostwick wrote:
    > On Sun, 07 Oct 2012 12:20:25 -0400, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 06 Oct 2012 23:19:25 -0500, Melba's Jammin'
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <50709242$1$26884$[email protected] >,
    >>> "Pete C." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Why is it common to brine pork and poultry, but not beef?
    >>>>
    >>>> It is, see Mal-Wart "enhanced" beef...
    >>>
    >>> Barf. That's why I refuse to buy Hormel fresh meats. I'll be damned if
    >>> I'll pay 30% of the cost of a pork tenderloin for what is tantamount to
    >>> a salt water solution.

    >>
    >> Actually the brine doesn't add weight, brine displaces an equal volume
    >> of water that's naturally in meat (meat is like 80% water)... often a
    >> too concentrated brine will reduce the weight of meat. You're not
    >> geting cheated on the weight, you're getting cheated on freshness...
    >> brined meat is not fresh meat. I really don't understand how they can
    >> get away with selling injected meat along with fresh meat but somehow
    >> they do, probably because not enough people complain... all folks need
    >> do is stop buying it and it will disappear. The meat people brine
    >> meat for one reason only, it greatly extends shelf life. Butter is
    >> salted for exactly the same reason, and I bet you happily buy salted
    >> butter, so be quiet.

    >
    > Injected meat is a whole different thing than brining. With
    > injection, you are actually adding liquid to the meat. With brining,
    > there is an exchange. IMO
    > Janet US
    >

    Exactly, the process walmart (and others who have followed) requires for
    their "fresh" meat is that it be injected to add additional liquid. That
    way they can make more money on by by selling water, and keep the
    "fresh" meat shelf stable for a month.

  20. #20
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Brining meat

    On Oct 7, 9:04*am, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    > On Sun, 07 Oct 2012 08:06:30 -0400, Gary <g.maj...@att.net> wrote:
    > >The Other Guy wrote:

    >
    > >> On Sat, 06 Oct 2012 23:18:11 -0500, Melba's Jammin'
    > >> <barbschal...@earthlink.net> wrote:

    >
    > >> >In article <sr6178htestc85icoasqlceog400unj...@4ax.com>,
    > >> > Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

    >
    > >> >> Melba's Jammin' wrote:

    >
    > >> >> >Why is it common to brine pork and poultry, but not beef?

    >
    > >> >> It's more common to brine beef.
    > >> >> Corned beef.
    > >> >> Sauerbratten.
    > >> >> It's more common than all the rest together to brine fish.

    >
    > >> >Corned beef, eh? *Didn't know that.

    >
    > >> And, of course, pastrami.

    >
    > >And also....."corned" is another word for "brined in salt water."

    >
    > Pastrami is essentially smoked corned beef.
    > Btw, brined in salt water is an oxymoron.


    It's redundant, because it uses two terms that mean the same thing. An
    oxymoron is two terms used together that are contradictory, like
    describing someone as pretty ugly.

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