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Thread: Bringing spaghetti to a school dinner

  1. #1
    Chris Guest

    Default Bringing spaghetti to a school dinner

    I have to bring spaghetti and meatballs (pasta separate from sauce +
    meatballs) to a dinner at my son's school tomorrow night.

    They can keep food warm, but cannot cook on a stovetop. I'm not sure
    whether they have regular ovens, convection, or just warming ovens.

    Dinner is at 6:00; they want the food there by 5:30; it will take me
    half an hour to get there and lug my stuff in to the school. So
    basically, I have to cook my pasta over an hour before it will be
    eaten

    So...what's the best way for me (and the other pasta volunteers) to
    keep the food hot, deliver it without hurting ourselves, and have the
    pasta not turn out mushy and totally stuck together? They want the
    sauce separate from the pasta.

    Any ideas or experiences? I know it's kind of late to ask, but
    figured whatever wisdom I can glean tonight will help, and anything
    that comes later will be great to know for the future.

    Thanks!
    Chris

  2. #2
    aem Guest

    Default Re: Bringing spaghetti to a school dinner

    On Jun 11, 3:36*pm, Chris <scootermo...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > I have to bring spaghetti and meatballs (pasta separate from sauce +
    > meatballs) to a dinner at my son's school tomorrow night.
    >
    > They can keep food warm, but cannot cook on a stovetop. *I'm not sure
    > whether they have regular ovens, convection, or just warming ovens.
    >
    > Dinner is at 6:00; they want the food there by 5:30; it will take me
    > half an hour to get there and lug my stuff in to the school. *So
    > basically, I have to cook my pasta over an hour before it will be
    > eaten
    >
    > So...what's the best way for me (and the other pasta volunteers) to
    > keep the food hot, deliver it without hurting ourselves, and have the
    > pasta not turn out mushy and totally stuck together? *They want the
    > sauce separate from the pasta.
    >
    > Any ideas or experiences? *I know it's kind of late to ask, but
    > figured whatever wisdom I can glean tonight will help, and anything
    > that comes later will be great to know for the future.
    >

    Find out immediately if they have facilities to boil water. If so,
    you can cook the pasta, drain it, toss it with a little oil, transport
    it, and reheat it in boiling water. Pastorio used to claim quite
    vociferously that pre-cooked, reheated pasta was great. He was blind
    to reality but it gives you a guideline.

    If they can't boil water for reheating purposes, I don't have any
    idea. Maybe there are steam tables and you can use hot, if not
    boiling water.... -aem

  3. #3
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Bringing spaghetti to a school dinner

    Chris said...

    > I have to bring spaghetti and meatballs (pasta separate from sauce +
    > meatballs) to a dinner at my son's school tomorrow night.
    >
    > They can keep food warm, but cannot cook on a stovetop. I'm not sure
    > whether they have regular ovens, convection, or just warming ovens.
    >
    > Dinner is at 6:00; they want the food there by 5:30; it will take me
    > half an hour to get there and lug my stuff in to the school. So
    > basically, I have to cook my pasta over an hour before it will be
    > eaten
    >
    > So...what's the best way for me (and the other pasta volunteers) to
    > keep the food hot, deliver it without hurting ourselves, and have the
    > pasta not turn out mushy and totally stuck together? They want the
    > sauce separate from the pasta.
    >
    > Any ideas or experiences? I know it's kind of late to ask, but
    > figured whatever wisdom I can glean tonight will help, and anything
    > that comes later will be great to know for the future.
    >
    > Thanks!
    > Chris



    What? A school without a full cafeteria?

    Anyway... I'd make the pasta al dente and put it into a large disposable
    aluminum roasting pan (or two, depending) add in a fair amount of the pasta
    water and cover with foil. Use another foil pan for the meatballs. Put the
    sauce in a gallon water jug. No clean up!

    Upon arrival, dial up the school on your cell phone and have them send one
    of the students to come to your car with a wheeled library (?) lab (?) cart
    and let them muscle it to the cafeteria for you.

    Or not.

    Best,

    Andy

  4. #4
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Bringing spaghetti to a school dinner


    "Chris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >I have to bring spaghetti and meatballs (pasta separate from sauce +
    > meatballs) to a dinner at my son's school tomorrow night.
    >
    > They can keep food warm, but cannot cook on a stovetop. I'm not sure
    > whether they have regular ovens, convection, or just warming ovens.
    >
    > Dinner is at 6:00; they want the food there by 5:30; it will take me
    > half an hour to get there and lug my stuff in to the school. So
    > basically, I have to cook my pasta over an hour before it will be
    > eaten
    >
    > So...what's the best way for me (and the other pasta volunteers) to
    > keep the food hot, deliver it without hurting ourselves, and have the
    > pasta not turn out mushy and totally stuck together? They want the
    > sauce separate from the pasta.
    >
    > Any ideas or experiences? I know it's kind of late to ask, but
    > figured whatever wisdom I can glean tonight will help, and anything
    > that comes later will be great to know for the future.
    >
    > Thanks!
    > Chris


    For how many?



  5. #5
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: Bringing spaghetti to a school dinner

    aem wrote:
    > Find out immediately if they have facilities to boil water. If so,
    > you can cook the pasta, drain it, toss it with a little oil, transport
    > it, and reheat it in boiling water. Pastorio used to claim quite
    > vociferously that pre-cooked, reheated pasta was great. He was blind
    > to reality but it gives you a guideline.
    >
    > If they can't boil water for reheating purposes, I don't have any
    > idea. Maybe there are steam tables and you can use hot, if not
    > boiling water.... -aem
    >


    Chris, please be prepared for them to take your well made spaghetti
    sauce, and mix it in a vat with everyone else's. Just be prepared for
    this to happen. Yes, I know it hurts. lol


    Becca

  6. #6
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Bringing spaghetti to a school dinner

    Also, I was thinking, use regular spaghetti, not vermicelli or angel hair,
    etc., and it will feed more students with eyes sometimes bigger than their
    stomachs with less going to waste if they can't finish their plates.

    ???

    Best,

    Andy

  7. #7
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: Bringing spaghetti to a school dinner

    On Jun 11, 6:36*pm, Chris <scootermo...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > I have to bring spaghetti and meatballs (pasta separate from sauce +
    > meatballs) to a dinner at my son's school tomorrow night.
    >
    > They can keep food warm, but cannot cook on a stovetop. *I'm not sure
    > whether they have regular ovens, convection, or just warming ovens.
    >
    > Dinner is at 6:00; they want the food there by 5:30; it will take me
    > half an hour to get there and lug my stuff in to the school. *So
    > basically, I have to cook my pasta over an hour before it will be
    > eaten
    >
    > So...what's the best way for me (and the other pasta volunteers) to
    > keep the food hot, deliver it without hurting ourselves, and have the
    > pasta not turn out mushy and totally stuck together? *They want the
    > sauce separate from the pasta.




    I'd put in enough sauce to keep the pasta separated. Why do they want
    it brought in this way?

    Thinking it over, I'd say hang 'em and bring the whole mess in a crock
    pot where I'd have it simmering away all day and unplug just before
    going. The utter nerve.....

    I once worked with a guy who served an Italian dinner to 80 ppl. in an
    hour and a half. He managed with four massive pots on the stove for
    the spaghet, staggered a batch every ten minutes. I never would've
    attempted it. I don't remember how he bailed it out tho and reserved
    the water. He had me busy making salads.

    Almost as bad a fish fry for 100 and trying to keep up with the
    French Fries demand. We had two deep commercial size fryers tho which
    made it all possible. Many hungry men in line wanted to know why the
    holdup. You could tell they weren't the cooks in their houses. Made
    to order was a foreign phrase.

  8. #8
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Bringing spaghetti to a school dinner

    On Thu, 11 Jun 2009 18:04:20 -0500, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:

    >What? A school without a full cafeteria?


    Not unusual in this day and age, unfortunately. Cooking kitchens are
    a thing of the past.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  9. #9
    George Guest

    Default Re: Bringing spaghetti to a school dinner

    Andy wrote:

    >
    >
    > What? A school without a full cafeteria?
    >


    Pretty common, there is a large plant near here that makes frozen "meals
    " for most of the local schools who just heat & serve big box style.


    > Anyway... I'd make the pasta al dente and put it into a large disposable
    > aluminum roasting pan (or two, depending) add in a fair amount of the pasta
    > water and cover with foil. Use another foil pan for the meatballs. Put the
    > sauce in a gallon water jug. No clean up!
    >
    > Upon arrival, dial up the school on your cell phone and have them send one
    > of the students to come to your car with a wheeled library (?) lab (?) cart
    > and let them muscle it to the cafeteria for you.
    >
    > Or not.
    >
    > Best,
    >
    > Andy


  10. #10
    Kathleen Guest

    Default Re: Bringing spaghetti to a school dinner

    Andy wrote:


    > What? A school without a full cafeteria?


    Spent much time around schools in the last couple of decades?

    K thru 12, our schools are supplied by an outside contractor. Some of
    the stuff is decent, most is crap unless you're fond of things like
    hamburgers floating in hot water and bruised square apples (the
    ironically named "Red Delicious").

    My son will be starting high school next year, my daughter finished high
    school a semester early and has been attending a local college and I
    still pack their lunches most days.


  11. #11
    Mr. Bill Guest

    Default Re: Bringing spaghetti to a school dinner

    >> I have to bring spaghetti and meatballs (pasta separate from sauce +
    >> meatballs) to a dinner at my son's school tomorrow night.


    That is a risky dish....I am positive that some child will have a
    gluten reaction.....a tomato reaction....a dairy reaction.....an
    oregano reaction....a mushroom reaction.....an oil in the water
    reaction......a salt reaction.....a green pepper reaction......a parm
    cheese reaction......a garlic reaction.

    I would take boiled water and label the contents with the water
    chemistry warnings: Consume at your own risk....boiled water was used
    in the preparation of this dish.




  12. #12
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Bringing spaghetti to a school dinner

    Becca wrote:
    > aem wrote:
    >> Find out immediately if they have facilities to boil water. If so,
    >> you can cook the pasta, drain it, toss it with a little oil, transport
    >> it, and reheat it in boiling water. Pastorio used to claim quite
    >> vociferously that pre-cooked, reheated pasta was great. He was blind
    >> to reality but it gives you a guideline.
    >>
    >> If they can't boil water for reheating purposes, I don't have any
    >> idea. Maybe there are steam tables and you can use hot, if not
    >> boiling water.... -aem
    >>

    >
    > Chris, please be prepared for them to take your well made spaghetti
    > sauce, and mix it in a vat with everyone else's. Just be prepared for
    > this to happen. Yes, I know it hurts. lol
    >
    >
    > Becca

    And, if they're selling dinners they will water it down if more people
    show up than anticipated. At least they always did when our kids were in
    school.

  13. #13
    Bob Muncie Guest

    Default Re: Bringing spaghetti to a school dinner

    Mr. Bill wrote:
    >>> I have to bring spaghetti and meatballs (pasta separate from sauce +
    >>> meatballs) to a dinner at my son's school tomorrow night.

    >
    > That is a risky dish....I am positive that some child will have a
    > gluten reaction.....a tomato reaction....a dairy reaction.....an
    > oregano reaction....a mushroom reaction.....an oil in the water
    > reaction......a salt reaction.....a green pepper reaction......a parm
    > cheese reaction......a garlic reaction.
    >
    > I would take boiled water and label the contents with the water
    > chemistry warnings: Consume at your own risk....boiled water was used
    > in the preparation of this dish.
    >
    >
    >


    Lucky for you he wasn't planning to take a chicken peanut satay dish...
    if might have had a seizure or something.

    Bob

  14. #14
    ms. tonya Guest

    Default Re: Bringing spaghetti to a school dinner

    >From: [email protected] (Andy)
    >Chris said...
    >I have to bring spaghetti and meatballs (pasta separate from
    >sauce + meatballs) to a dinner at my son's school
    >tomorrow night.
    >They can keep food warm, but cannot cook on a
    >stovetop. I'm not sure whether they have regular ovens, convection,
    >or just warming ovens.
    >Dinner is at 6:00; they want the food there by
    >5:30; it will take me half an hour to get
    >there and lug my stuff in to the school. So
    >basically, I have to cook my pasta over an hour
    >before it will be eaten
    >So...what's the best way for me (and the other pasta
    >volunteers) to keep the food hot, deliver it without hurting
    >ourselves, and have the pasta not turn out mushy and
    >totally stuck together? They want the sauce separate from the
    >pasta.
    >Any ideas or experiences? I know it's kind of late
    >to ask, but figured whatever wisdom I can glean tonight
    >will help, and anything that comes later will be great
    >to know for the future.
    >Thanks!
    >Chris


    >What? A school without a full cafeteria?

    ------------------------------------------------------

    The school probably has a full cafeteria but policy states not for after
    school activities nor for the general public to touch.

    I attended quite a few after school affairs which we had to bring food &
    the kitchen equipement was off limits & doors locked only the dining
    room itself was available.


  15. #15
    Orlando Enrique Fiol Guest

    Default Re: Bringing spaghetti to a school dinner

    [email protected] wrote:
    >My son will be starting high school next year, my daughter finished high
    >school a semester early and has been attending a local college and I
    >still pack their lunches most days.


    Being Dominican, Puerto Rican and Italian by ancestry, I could never get used
    to the crappy food that always passed for lunch in every school I attended. My
    mother tried to get me to eat that swill for a few months during one year, but
    I resisted so vehemently that she gave up and packed my lunches until I
    graduated high school. When I got tired of sandwiches as a teenager, her
    deletable lunches became even simpler to make; all she had to do was put the
    previous night's leftovers in a container. I was the envy of everyone in that
    cafeteria.

    Orlando

  16. #16
    Orlando Enrique Fiol Guest

    Default Re: Bringing spaghetti to a school dinner

    [email protected] wrote:
    >Lucky for you he wasn't planning to take a chicken peanut satay dish...
    >if might have had a seizure or something.


    Really, can't schools get themselves sufficiently organized to provide
    appropriate foods for various intolerances without ruining every meal by
    covering their butts? I'm sure that if we spent just a little less in Iraq,
    we'd have enough money to make sure that every American child eats according to
    what his/her body can handle. I know we could do it.

    Orlando

  17. #17
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Bringing spaghetti to a school dinner


    "Mr. Bill" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >>> I have to bring spaghetti and meatballs (pasta separate from sauce +
    >>> meatballs) to a dinner at my son's school tomorrow night.

    >
    > That is a risky dish....I am positive that some child will have a
    > gluten reaction.....a tomato reaction....a dairy reaction.....an
    > oregano reaction....a mushroom reaction.....an oil in the water
    > reaction......a salt reaction.....a green pepper reaction......a parm
    > cheese reaction......a garlic reaction.
    >
    > I would take boiled water and label the contents with the water
    > chemistry warnings: Consume at your own risk....boiled water was used
    > in the preparation of this dish.
    >


    And there was a jar of peanut butter in the pantry where the pasta as
    stored.

    Paul
    >
    >




  18. #18
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Bringing spaghetti to a school dinner

    Andy wrote:
    >
    >> What? A school without a full cafeteria?

    >


    Let's not be stupid... what makes you think some PTA soccer mom who has yet
    to figure out microwave popcorn is going to be granted permission to use the
    school cafeteria facilities... a sports bra mom will probably burn the
    school down



  19. #19
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Bringing spaghetti to a school dinner


    "Orlando Enrique Fiol" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] ..
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >>My son will be starting high school next year, my daughter finished high
    >>school a semester early and has been attending a local college and I
    >>still pack their lunches most days.

    >
    > Being Dominican, Puerto Rican and Italian by ancestry, I could never get
    > used
    > to the crappy food that always passed for lunch in every school I
    > attended. My
    > mother tried to get me to eat that swill for a few months during one year,
    > but
    > I resisted so vehemently that she gave up and packed my lunches until I
    > graduated high school. When I got tired of sandwiches as a teenager, her
    > deletable lunches became even simpler to make; all she had to do was put
    > the
    > previous night's leftovers in a container. I was the envy of everyone in
    > that
    > cafeteria.
    >
    >

    Amazin' how so many Ricans made sure their kids were too obese to get laid.



  20. #20
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Bringing spaghetti to a school dinner

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Chris <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I have to bring spaghetti and meatballs (pasta separate from sauce +
    > meatballs) to a dinner at my son's school tomorrow night.
    >
    > They can keep food warm, but cannot cook on a stovetop. I'm not sure
    > whether they have regular ovens, convection, or just warming ovens.
    >
    > Dinner is at 6:00; they want the food there by 5:30; it will take me
    > half an hour to get there and lug my stuff in to the school. So
    > basically, I have to cook my pasta over an hour before it will be
    > eaten
    >
    > So...what's the best way for me (and the other pasta volunteers) to
    > keep the food hot, deliver it without hurting ourselves, and have the
    > pasta not turn out mushy and totally stuck together? They want the
    > sauce separate from the pasta.
    >
    > Any ideas or experiences? I know it's kind of late to ask, but
    > figured whatever wisdom I can glean tonight will help, and anything
    > that comes later will be great to know for the future.
    >
    > Thanks!
    > Chris


    Oil the pasta lightly to keep it from getting sticky. You can use an
    ice chest to keep stuff hot for quite awhile. You can pack some towels
    around it for additional insulation and padding to keep it from sliding
    around.

    I use small ice chests all the time (12" x 12" ones) to keep breakfast
    tacos hot when I take them out to the range with me.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
    It's about learning to dance in the rain.
    -- Anon.

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

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