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Thread: Bread Proof? a super addition

  1. #1
    Polly Esther Guest

    Default Bread Proof? a super addition

    Our new stove - okay, it's about 3 years old and I still keep the manual
    handy - has a bread proof cycle. If you ever just might maybe want to bake
    bread and are given the opportunity to buy a stove with the bread proof
    ability, oh my! it is wonderful.
    Today, as always, I was doing some laundry, cooking some potatoes,
    helping DH rake up pecan tree beards (don't know what they're good for) and
    needed my loaves of bread to get going.
    The bread proof cycle keeps the loaves at a gentle 100 degrees. I set
    the dinger/timer every 30 minutes to remind me to come check on progress.
    Heaps of the things on our stove are untried but this one is such a help.
    Polly


  2. #2
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: Bread Proof? a super addition

    On Apr 21, 8:59*pm, "Polly Esther" <Polly...@cableone.net> wrote:
    > Our new stove - okay, it's about 3 years old and I still keep the manual
    > handy - has a bread proof cycle. *If you ever just might maybe want to bake
    > bread and are given the opportunity to buy a stove with the bread proof
    > ability, oh my! it is wonderful.
    > * * Today, as always, I was doing some laundry, cooking some potatoes,
    > helping DH rake up pecan tree beards (don't know what they're good for) and
    > needed my loaves of bread to get going.
    > * * The bread proof cycle keeps the loaves at a gentle 100 degrees. *I set
    > the dinger/timer every 30 minutes to remind me to come check on progress.
    > Heaps of the things on our stove are untried but this one is such a help.
    > Polly


    100% agree with you as I have the same feature on my oven- love it! I
    also have a drying cycle...

  3. #3
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Bread Proof? a super addition

    On Sat, 21 Apr 2012 22:59:41 -0500, Polly Esther wrote:

    > Our new stove - okay, it's about 3 years old and I still keep the manual
    > handy - has a bread proof cycle. If you ever just might maybe want to bake
    > bread and are given the opportunity to buy a stove with the bread proof
    > ability, oh my! it is wonderful.
    > Today, as always, I was doing some laundry, cooking some potatoes,
    > helping DH rake up pecan tree beards (don't know what they're good for) and
    > needed my loaves of bread to get going.
    > The bread proof cycle keeps the loaves at a gentle 100 degrees. I set
    > the dinger/timer every 30 minutes to remind me to come check on progress.
    > Heaps of the things on our stove are untried but this one is such a help.
    > Polly


    How does it do it, by cycling off/on or does it use just a portion of
    the main burner to do it?

    =sw

  4. #4
    Polly Esther Guest

    Default Re: Bread Proof? a super addition

    "Sqwertz" <
    > On Sat, 21 Apr 2012 22:59:41 -0500, Polly Esther wrote:
    >
    >> Our new stove - okay, it's about 3 years old and I still keep the manual
    >> handy - has a bread proof cycle. If you ever just might maybe want to
    >> bake
    >> bread and are given the opportunity to buy a stove with the bread proof
    >> ability, oh my! it is wonderful.
    >> Today, as always, I was doing some laundry, cooking some potatoes,
    >> helping DH rake up pecan tree beards (don't know what they're good for)
    >> and
    >> needed my loaves of bread to get going.
    >> The bread proof cycle keeps the loaves at a gentle 100 degrees. I
    >> set
    >> the dinger/timer every 30 minutes to remind me to come check on progress.
    >> Heaps of the things on our stove are untried but this one is such a help.
    >> Polly

    >
    > How does it do it, by cycling off/on or does it use just a portion of
    > the main burner to do it?
    >
    > =sw

    Good question but I have no idea. Our home is quiet and I can usually hear
    when my sewing machine bobbin is running low on thread and if the Yorkie
    snoring ... but I never hear the proof cycle going on/off. Polly


  5. #5
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Bread Proof? a super addition

    On Apr 21, 10:59*pm, "Polly Esther" <Polly...@cableone.net> wrote:
    > Our new stove - okay, it's about 3 years old and I still keep the manual
    > handy - has a bread proof cycle. *If you ever just might maybe want to bake
    > bread and are given the opportunity to buy a stove with the bread proof
    > ability, oh my! it is wonderful.
    > * * Today, as always, I was doing some laundry, cooking some potatoes,
    > helping DH rake up pecan tree beards (don't know what they're good for) and
    > needed my loaves of bread to get going.
    > * * The bread proof cycle keeps the loaves at a gentle 100 degrees. *I set
    > the dinger/timer every 30 minutes to remind me to come check on progress.
    > Heaps of the things on our stove are untried but this one is such a help.


    IMO, ovens should be continuously variable from the bread proofing
    temp of 100F to their upper limit, which should be pretty high. 100F
    is too low for yogurt making. My gas oven has a lower limit of 170F,
    which sucks. I'd like the options of 120F for yogurt, 140F for eggs,
    and 150 F for beef that has been pre-browned at a higher temp. I
    don't need the oven maker to babysit my food safety.

    > Polly


    --Bryan

  6. #6
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Bread Proof? a super addition

    On Saturday, April 21, 2012 5:59:41 PM UTC-10, Polly Esther wrote:
    > Our new stove - okay, it's about 3 years old and I still keep the manual
    > handy - has a bread proof cycle. If you ever just might maybe want to bake
    > bread and are given the opportunity to buy a stove with the bread proof
    > ability, oh my! it is wonderful.
    > Today, as always, I was doing some laundry, cooking some potatoes,
    > helping DH rake up pecan tree beards (don't know what they're good for) and
    > needed my loaves of bread to get going.
    > The bread proof cycle keeps the loaves at a gentle 100 degrees. I set
    > the dinger/timer every 30 minutes to remind me to come check on progress.
    > Heaps of the things on our stove are untried but this one is such a help.
    > Polly


    I think I've lost my manual for my oven. I've got a button labeled "Proof" too but I don't believe I've ever pressed it. When I used to bake bread a lot, I'd sometimes turn the oven element on for a minute or so. A lot of times, I'd just proof at room temperature since it's usually relatively warm here. I'll have to check that button out just for the heck of it. Thanks forthe idea.

  7. #7
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: Bread Proof? a super addition

    Bryan <[email protected]> wrote:

    -snip-
    >IMO, ovens should be continuously variable from the bread proofing
    >temp of 100F to their upper limit, which should be pretty high. 100F
    >is too low for yogurt making. My gas oven has a lower limit of 170F,
    >which sucks. I'd like the options of 120F for yogurt, 140F for eggs,
    >and 150 F for beef that has been pre-browned at a higher temp. I
    >don't need the oven maker to babysit my food safety.
    >


    One of these fine days I'll take 15 minutes in the shop and make a
    proofing box which will take care of my 70-170 degree needs. I've
    got a good thermostat & will probably use one of the many terrarium
    heaters I've got lying around.
    http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/894...able-materials
    [I'm leaning towards the first design-- but with heat]

    In the meantime, I go with a pan of warm water in the oven-- and often
    leave it there while baking.

    If I ran across a stove with the 70-700 degree option when I'm stove
    shopping I'd be tempted. [I make do now with 170-550]

    Jim

  8. #8
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Bread Proof? a super addition

    On Apr 21, 8:59*pm, "Polly Esther" <Polly...@cableone.net> wrote:
    > Our new stove - okay, it's about 3 years old and I still keep the manual
    > handy - has a bread proof cycle. *If you ever just might maybe want to bake
    > bread and are given the opportunity to buy a stove with the bread proof
    > ability, oh my! it is wonderful.
    > * * Today, as always, I was doing some laundry, cooking some potatoes,
    > helping DH rake up pecan tree beards (don't know what they're good for) and
    > needed my loaves of bread to get going.
    > * * The bread proof cycle keeps the loaves at a gentle 100 degrees. *I set
    > the dinger/timer every 30 minutes to remind me to come check on progress.
    > Heaps of the things on our stove are untried but this one is such a help.
    > Polly


    Finally replacement functionality for the old stoves with pilot
    lights!

    For letting bread rise, the best spot in my kitchen is the top of the
    fridge -- a steady 85-90F.

  9. #9
    Ema Nymton Guest

    Default Re: Bread Proof? a super addition

    On 4/22/2012 12:10 PM, spamtrap1888 wrote:

    > For letting bread rise, the best spot in my kitchen is the top of the
    > fridge -- a steady 85-90F.


    Several years ago, I had a bowl of dough, covered with plastic and a
    dish towel, and I put it on top of the car in the garage, which was
    fairly warm. When I went back to check on it, the dough was covered
    with ants. Using the top of the fridge is a better idea.

    Becca

  10. #10
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Bread Proof? a super addition

    On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 12:27:16 -0500, Ema Nymton wrote:

    > Several years ago, I had a bowl of dough, covered with plastic and a
    > dish towel, and I put it on top of the car in the garage, which was
    > fairly warm. When I went back to check on it, the dough was covered
    > with ants. Using the top of the fridge is a better idea.


    How long did you leave it there? It would be really hard for ants to
    find the top of a car with fully inflated tires. Pretend you're an
    ant and have to get to the roof of a car... ;-) It would be easier
    for them to parachute in!

    -sw

  11. #11
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Bread Proof? a super addition

    On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 15:06:27 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 12:27:16 -0500, Ema Nymton wrote:
    >
    >> Several years ago, I had a bowl of dough, covered with plastic and a
    >> dish towel, and I put it on top of the car in the garage, which was
    >> fairly warm. When I went back to check on it, the dough was covered
    >> with ants. Using the top of the fridge is a better idea.

    >
    >How long did you leave it there? It would be really hard for ants to
    >find the top of a car with fully inflated tires. Pretend you're an
    >ant and have to get to the roof of a car... ;-) It would be easier
    >for them to parachute in!
    >
    >-sw


    Ants would have no problem whatsoever dancing up car tires to the roof
    of a car to get to a bowl of bread dough, in fact they would also drop
    down from the garage rafters. There's hardly anywahre ants can't get
    to... ain'tcha ever seen The Nakid Jungle... Eleanor Parker was HOT...
    I would have liked to crawl all over her too!
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Naked_Jungle



  12. #12
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Bread Proof? a super addition

    On Apr 21, 8:59*pm, "Polly Esther" <Polly...@cableone.net> wrote:
    > Our new stove - okay, it's about 3 years old and I still keep the manual
    > handy - has a bread proof cycle. *If you ever just might maybe want to bake
    > bread and are given the opportunity to buy a stove with the bread proof
    > ability, oh my! it is wonderful.
    > * * Today, as always, I was doing some laundry, cooking some potatoes,
    > helping DH rake up pecan tree beards (don't know what they're good for) and
    > needed my loaves of bread to get going.
    > * * The bread proof cycle keeps the loaves at a gentle 100 degrees. *I set
    > the dinger/timer every 30 minutes to remind me to come check on progress.
    > Heaps of the things on our stove are untried but this one is such a help.
    > Polly


    Polly, that's wonderful. My stove has no goodies like that so I
    always raise my bread in the oven with the oven light on.
    The oven light seems to keep it at the perfect temperature.

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