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Thread: Bread Machines

  1. #1
    KenK Guest

    Default Bread Machines

    Don't get me wrong, I love my old Regal bread machine. Love the smell of
    baking bread and love experimenting with new recipes. However.... Is there
    a bread machine that retracts its paddle(s) at the critical moment and so
    avoids the big hole left in the loaf when the paddle is be removed?

    I can't make the bread the old fashioned way - arthritis in my hands.

    Ken


    --
    "When you choose the lesser of two evils, always
    remember that it is still an evil." - Max Lerner







  2. #2
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Bread Machines

    On May 25, 11:00*am, KenK <inva...@invalid.com> wrote:
    > Don't get me wrong, I love my old Regal bread machine. Love the smell of
    > baking bread and love experimenting with new recipes. However.... Is there
    > a bread machine that retracts its paddle(s) at the critical moment and so
    > avoids the big hole left in the loaf when the paddle is be removed?
    >
    > I can't make the bread the old fashioned way - arthritis in my hands.
    >
    > Ken
    >
    > --
    > "When you choose the lesser of two evils, always
    > remember that it is still an evil." - Max Lerner


    when i was using the bread machine, i would take the loaf out of the
    machine at the end of the mixing cycle, remove the paddle & put it
    back into the machine to finish baking.

    harriet & critters in azusa, ca (15 miles east of pasadena, ca)

  3. #3
    MaryL Guest

    Default Re: Bread Machines


    "KenK" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Don't get me wrong, I love my old Regal bread machine. Love the smell of
    > baking bread and love experimenting with new recipes. However.... Is there
    > a bread machine that retracts its paddle(s) at the critical moment and so
    > avoids the big hole left in the loaf when the paddle is be removed?
    >
    > I can't make the bread the old fashioned way - arthritis in my hands.
    >
    > Ken
    >
    >
    > --
    > "When you choose the lesser of two evils, always
    > remember that it is still an evil." - Max Lerner
    >

    I had a Welbilt *dough maker* that was great. It was not a bread maker, so
    it was much lighter in weight (and easier to store) because it did not have
    the baking element. However, I thought it made bread that was much superior
    to the bread makers, but it did all the work. I could use it for bread,
    pasta, or pastry. It would do the kneading and raising until the final
    action. Then, I could take the dough out and put it in whatever size pan I
    wanted (no kneading--that was already done). I made some great whole wheat
    bread and even shredded wheat bread this way.

    That was years ago, and I don't know if they are even made any more. If so,
    that might be something to consider. It would avoid the problem you asked
    about, puts no stress on your wrists, and lets you use the dough in any
    shape of pan you want. The one I had was Welbilt Multi-Logic Dough Maker
    Model #DM2000. As I said, this was a number of years ago.

    MaryL


  4. #4
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Bread Machines

    KenK wrote:
    > Don't get me wrong, I love my old Regal bread machine. Love the smell of
    > baking bread and love experimenting with new recipes. However.... Is there
    > a bread machine that retracts its paddle(s) at the critical moment and so
    > avoids the big hole left in the loaf when the paddle is be removed?
    >
    > I can't make the bread the old fashioned way - arthritis in my hands.
    >
    > Ken
    >
    >


    Dump the dough in a bread pan and bake in the oven. It'll also look and
    cut like a regular loaf.

  5. #5
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Bread Machines

    KenK wrote:
    >
    > Is there a bread machine that retracts its paddle(s) at the critical
    > moment and so avoids the big hole left in the loaf when the paddle is be
    > removed?
    >
    >

    Not that I know of. However if right after the last knead you dump the
    dough, remove the paddle, and put the dough back to rise and then bake there
    won't be nearly so big a hole. Although I don't see the big deal about the
    hole, you're eventually going to chew the bread into mush



  6. #6
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Re: Bread Machines

    On 25 May 2009 18:00:59 GMT, KenK <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Don't get me wrong, I love my old Regal bread machine. Love the smell of
    >baking bread and love experimenting with new recipes. However.... Is there
    >a bread machine that retracts its paddle(s) at the critical moment and so
    >avoids the big hole left in the loaf when the paddle is be removed?
    >
    >I can't make the bread the old fashioned way - arthritis in my hands.


    FWIW: I also have arthritis in hands and wrists.

    I use the dough cycle, then give it one last rise (ibuprofen,
    capsaicin) before free-forming the loaf or packing it into a
    loaf pan.

    Alex

  7. #7
    Joseph Littleshoes Guest

    Default Re: Bread Machines



    brooklyn1 wrote:
    > KenK wrote:
    >
    >>Is there a bread machine that retracts its paddle(s) at the critical
    >>moment and so avoids the big hole left in the loaf when the paddle is be
    >>removed?
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Not that I know of. However if right after the last knead you dump the
    > dough, remove the paddle, and put the dough back to rise and then bake there
    > won't be nearly so big a hole. Although I don't see the big deal about the
    > hole, you're eventually going to chew the bread into mush
    >
    >


    Ordinarily i would indicate precisely how, with what and where Sheldon
    could fill any particular 'hole' he would be likely to mention.

    But in this case i would suggest a good sharp cheddar, mashed garlic and
    oregano.
    --
    JL





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