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Thread: Bread

  1. #21
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: Bread

    On Mon, 4 May 2009 15:44:17 -0700, "Dimitri" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Boron Elgar" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]. .
    >> On Mon, 4 May 2009 14:38:27 -0600, "Janet Bostwick"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>"Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>news:lbGLl.9609$[email protected]. .
    >>>>
    >>>> "graham" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>> news:l9GLl.10335$[email protected]..
    >>>>
    >>>> <snip>
    >>>>
    >>>>> Exellent results. You should post those pix on rec.food.sourdough!
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks I had no ides there was a sourdough NG.
    >>>>
    >>>> Dimitri
    >>>Rec.food.sourdough is not for the faint of heart. Come on over to
    >>>alt.bread.recipes, we'd love to have a new breadie.
    >>>Janet
    >>>

    >>
    >> Janet is right, Dimitri. We'd love to have you over at alt.bread.
    >> recipes.
    >>
    >> Boron

    >
    >Subscribed - should I re-post?
    >
    >Dimitri
    >


    I saw your post over at rec.food.sourdough, but no posting at abr.

    Boron

  2. #22
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: Bread

    On Mon, 4 May 2009 15:41:53 -0700, "Dimitri" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Boron Elgar" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]. .


    >>
    >> Use the measure of your flour as 100% and calculate the ratio of water
    >> to flour.
    >>
    >> 4 ounces flour, 4 ounces water is 100% hydration.
    >>
    >> 4 ounces flour, 6 ounces water is 150% hydration.
    >>
    >> 4 ounces flour, 2 ounces water is 50% hydration.
    >>
    >> This allows you to be able to convert almost any yeast recipe to
    >> sourdough base, as you can substitute the amount of flour and water
    >> (or other liquids with a little bit of effort) in the recipe for what
    >> you have in your starter.
    >>
    >> Boron

    >
    >Does this make sence?
    >
    > Starter
    > Water Flour
    > 0.75 0.75
    > 1.00 1.00
    >
    > sponge
    >
    > 0.75 0.75 3/4 cup starter
    > 1.00 1.50 1 cup water to 1.5 cups flour
    >
    >dough
    > 2 6.50 2 cups water to 6.5 cups flour
    >
    >Total
    > 3.75 8.75 Total
    >
    >3.75/8.75 = .43
    >
    >43% hydration ????
    >
    >Keep in mind I live by the ocean and the humidity has been probably 95% very
    >foggy
    >
    >Dimitri
    >


    I think you have the starter in there twice, or maybe three times. I
    admit to being confused, but that if likely me, not you. A 43%
    hydration dough would be almost unkneadable. Really dry.

    Although I pay attention to hydration in my starter, I rarely do so
    in my doughs, relying on touch and sight. I am notorious for it, I'm
    afraid, and not a good example. Janet would be a better person to make
    it clear to you.

    Boron


  3. #23
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Bread

    "Boron Elgar" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Mon, 4 May 2009 15:41:53 -0700, "Dimitri" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Boron Elgar" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected] ..

    >
    >>>
    >>> Use the measure of your flour as 100% and calculate the ratio of water
    >>> to flour.
    >>>
    >>> 4 ounces flour, 4 ounces water is 100% hydration.
    >>>
    >>> 4 ounces flour, 6 ounces water is 150% hydration.
    >>>
    >>> 4 ounces flour, 2 ounces water is 50% hydration.
    >>>
    >>> This allows you to be able to convert almost any yeast recipe to
    >>> sourdough base, as you can substitute the amount of flour and water
    >>> (or other liquids with a little bit of effort) in the recipe for what
    >>> you have in your starter.
    >>>
    >>> Boron

    >>
    >>Does this make sence?
    >>
    >> Starter
    >> Water Flour
    >> 0.75 0.75
    >> 1.00 1.00




    >> sponge
    >>
    >> 0.75 0.75 3/4 cup starter

    This is probably an error in the calculation as ir SB 1/3 cup water 1/3 cup
    flour


    >> 1.00 1.50 1 cup water to 1.5 cups flour

    OK as is

    >>dough
    >> 2 6.50


    2 cups water to 6.5 cups flour note started at 5.5 and kept increasing as
    the very first bread I shaped fell in the final rise.

    OK as is

    >>Total
    >> 3.75 8.75 Total


    need to correct.
    >>
    >>3.75/8.75 = .43
    >>
    >>43% hydration ????
    >>
    >>Keep in mind I live by the ocean and the humidity has been probably 95%
    >>very
    >>foggy
    >>
    >>Dimitri
    >>

    >
    > I think you have the starter in there twice, or maybe three times. I
    > admit to being confused, but that if likely me, not you. A 43%
    > hydration dough would be almost unkneadable. Really dry.
    >
    > Although I pay attention to hydration in my starter, I rarely do so
    > in my doughs, relying on touch and sight. I am notorious for it, I'm
    > afraid, and not a good example. Janet would be a better person to make
    > it clear to you.
    >
    > Boron



    Here is the recipe I followed:

    Dimitri

    San Francisco Sourdough BREAD, from Bread Alone by Daniel Leader & Judith
    Blahnik:

    First make up a sponge and let it sit at 74 - 80 degree draft free place for
    24 hours:



    Starter - 2/3 cup
    Water (dechlorinated) - 1 cup
    White flour - 1 1/2 cup

    Final dough:

    Water - 2 cups
    White flour - 5 1/2 - 6 1/2 cups
    Fine sea salt - 1 T



    Mix final dough and knead it for 15 to 20 minutes. Let it ferment at 74 -
    80 degrees in a draft free area for 2 1/2 hours in a large bowl, covered
    with a damp towel or plastic wrap. Deflate the dough by pushing down in the
    center and pulling up on the sides. Cover bowl with a clean damp towel or
    plastic wrap and let sit in a warm (74-80) draft free place for 30 minutes.
    Turn out on a floured area and knead briefly. Shape into a tight ball.
    Cover with a clean damp towel or plastic wrap and put in a warm (74-80)
    draft free place for 30 minutes. Shape. You may divide the dough into two
    pieces and shape into two round logs or into round loaves (free form) or one
    large freeform loaf. Proof the loaves in a warm (74-80) draft free place
    till they rise 1 1/2 times the size - about 1 hour - on a floured towel.
    Preheat oven for an hour before baking. Bake an a baking stone at 450 for
    15 minutes, reduce heat to 425 for 20 minutes longer. Turn out and thump the
    bottom to test for doneness (sounds hollow) and cool on a wire rack for 25
    minutes before cutting. Spritzing the oven at the beginning and each 3
    minutes for the first 10 minutes will make a hard crust. One can use two
    conventional baking pans if desired.


  4. #24
    Miche Guest

    Default Re: Bread

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Mr. Bill <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Mon, 4 May 2009 15:25:59 -0700, "Dimitri" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Please lose the HTML and post in plane text only no music or fancy stuff.

    >
    > Isn't it about time to push ourselves into the 21st century...?


    Usenet is a text-only medium.

    If you want flashy lights and spinning bunnies there's Web forums.

    Miche

    --
    Electricians do it in three phases

  5. #25
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Bread

    On Mon, 4 May 2009 08:43:51 -0700, Dimitri wrote:

    > I never had had the time or the patience to go through the learning curve
    > for bread baking. Now having said that I dearly love the taste of Sourdough
    > bread.
    >
    > Recently, for the second time I went here
    >
    > http://home.att.net/~carlsfriends/
    >
    > And picked up some of their sourdough starter N/C.
    >
    > Yesterday was my second attempt and I used a stiffer dough than the first
    > time.
    >

    <snip>

    looks damned successful for a second attempt, dimitri. congratulations.

    your pal,
    blake

  6. #26
    koko Guest

    Default Re: Bread

    On Mon, 4 May 2009 08:43:51 -0700, "Dimitri" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I never had had the time or the patience to go through the learning curve
    >for bread baking. Now having said that I dearly love the taste of Sourdough
    >bread.
    >


    snippage

    It looks like a beautiful loaf to me. Thanks for the photos they are
    great.

    koko
    --

    There is no love more sincere than the love of food
    George Bernard Shaw
    www.kokoscorner.typepad.com
    updated 04/26

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