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Thread: A bowl of oatmeal

  1. #1
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default A bowl of oatmeal

    I haven't had oatmeal in as long as I can remember, just
    about. I mean, I've had oatmeal cookies, I've had granola.
    Whatever. But not a bowl of oatmeal.

    That's what I'm having for breakfast today. I need something
    to stick to my ribs while I move 21 plus inches of snow off my
    sidewalk and driveway. If this keeps up, I'm getting a snow
    blower. This winter and last winter have made up for all the
    no-snow winters of the last decade.

    nancy

  2. #2
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: A bowl of oatmeal

    On Mon, 27 Dec 2010 08:13:26 -0500, "Nancy Young"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I haven't had oatmeal in as long as I can remember, just
    >about. I mean, I've had oatmeal cookies, I've had granola.
    >Whatever. But not a bowl of oatmeal.
    >
    >That's what I'm having for breakfast today. I need something
    >to stick to my ribs while I move 21 plus inches of snow off my
    >sidewalk and driveway. If this keeps up, I'm getting a snow
    >blower. This winter and last winter have made up for all the
    >no-snow winters of the last decade.
    >
    >nancy


    We debated oatmeal awhile ago, but opted for home made bagels instead.

    We got over 2 feet of snow here in Northern NJ. I live between 2 lakes
    and a reservoir and have my own mini-climate with lake effect. We
    often get a few inches more snow than other parts of town. It's
    beautiful out there.

    I heartily recommend the snow blower. It isn't that it gets used often
    every year, but I do not know anyone in these parts who has regretted
    a purchase.

    Boron

  3. #3
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: A bowl of oatmeal

    On 27/12/2010 8:13 AM, Nancy Young wrote:
    > I haven't had oatmeal in as long as I can remember, just
    > about. I mean, I've had oatmeal cookies, I've had granola.
    > Whatever. But not a bowl of oatmeal.
    >
    > That's what I'm having for breakfast today. I need something
    > to stick to my ribs while I move 21 plus inches of snow off my
    > sidewalk and driveway. If this keeps up, I'm getting a snow
    > blower. This winter and last winter have made up for all the
    > no-snow winters of the last decade.
    > nancy


    I recommend both. I love oatmeal porridge, but it has to be made with
    large flake or steel cut and I buy mine at the Bulk Barn because they
    charge only 75 cents per pound for all types of oatmeal. For some
    reason, grocery stores charge about 4 times that for steel cut.

    Snow blowers are handy to have. If it is just a light snow fall it is
    usually easier and faster to use a wide pusher shovel than a blower, but
    if there is more than a few inches of snow and it is heavy it is handy
    to have a blower. If you are going to get a blower, it may had well be
    a big heavy duty model.


  4. #4
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: A bowl of oatmeal

    On 27/12/2010 8:50 AM, Dave Smith wrote:

    >
    > Snow blowers are handy to have. If it is just a light snow fall it is
    > usually easier and faster to use a wide pusher shovel than a blower, but
    > if there is more than a few inches of snow and it is heavy it is handy
    > to have a blower. If you are going to get a blower, it may had well be a
    > big heavy duty model.
    >


    .................on the other hand....... if you only get snow once in a
    while, it is probably cheaper and easier to high a kid or a snow removal
    service.

  5. #5
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: A bowl of oatmeal

    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:4d189159$0$29483$[email protected]..
    > I haven't had oatmeal in as long as I can remember, just
    > about. I mean, I've had oatmeal cookies, I've had granola.
    > Whatever. But not a bowl of oatmeal.
    >
    > That's what I'm having for breakfast today. I need something
    > to stick to my ribs while I move 21 plus inches of snow off my
    > sidewalk and driveway. If this keeps up, I'm getting a snow
    > blower. This winter and last winter have made up for all the
    > no-snow winters of the last decade.
    > nancy



    It snowed here briefly yesterday afternoon but it's long gone. Now there's
    just some ice on the patio. I guess I won't be sitting outside today! (I
    peeked outside last night and surprised a raccoon drinking out of the bird
    bath before it froze.) But hey, I have some oatmeal and I might just make
    some for breakfast.

    Jill


  6. #6
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: A bowl of oatmeal

    Boron Elgar wrote:
    > On Mon, 27 Dec 2010 08:13:26 -0500, "Nancy Young"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:


    >> That's what I'm having for breakfast today. I need something
    >> to stick to my ribs while I move 21 plus inches of snow off my
    >> sidewalk and driveway. If this keeps up, I'm getting a snow
    >> blower. This winter and last winter have made up for all the
    >> no-snow winters of the last decade.


    > We debated oatmeal awhile ago, but opted for home made bagels instead.


    Now you're talkin'!

    > We got over 2 feet of snow here in Northern NJ. I live between 2 lakes
    > and a reservoir and have my own mini-climate with lake effect. We
    > often get a few inches more snow than other parts of town. It's
    > beautiful out there.


    I bet it's just gorgeous up there. The white stuff is pretty anyway,
    but I like to think I can get out to my car if I have to. If this freezes
    before I shovel, I'm in deep doo doo. so far it's fluffy.

    > I heartily recommend the snow blower. It isn't that it gets used often
    > every year, but I do not know anyone in these parts who has regretted
    > a purchase.


    I live closer to the ocean and we don't usually get the snow amounts
    other people do, but the guy across the street got busy a few times
    last year with his blower and cleared out our car. I can't expect him to
    keep that up. I think getting one is a foregone conclusion at this point.

    nancy

  7. #7
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: A bowl of oatmeal

    On 27/12/2010 8:58 AM, Nancy Young wrote:

    >
    > I live closer to the ocean and we don't usually get the snow amounts
    > other people do, but the guy across the street got busy a few times
    > last year with his blower and cleared out our car. I can't expect him to
    > keep that up. I think getting one is a foregone conclusion at this point.


    How often would you actually need to use one?
    I have a good snow blower, and I use it a lot. There have been times
    when I have had to go out and clear the driveway daily for weeks, and
    times when I have had to do it more than once per day.

    If you need.... really need.... a snow blower, it has to be a good one,
    and they usually cost $1000-1500. They need to be maintained or else
    they won't work when you need them.

    There are smaller models of snow blowers and those useless semi snow
    blowers, with gas engines too small to do anything much, or
    electric..... totally useless.

    If you live in a climate where it rarely snows, it is likely to be wet,
    heavy snow. Most snow blowers won't work on that type of snow. It just
    gets clogged up in the chute.



    I have a snow blower because I can use it a lot.



  8. #8
    George Guest

    Default Re: A bowl of oatmeal

    On 12/27/2010 8:13 AM, Nancy Young wrote:
    > I haven't had oatmeal in as long as I can remember, just
    > about. I mean, I've had oatmeal cookies, I've had granola.
    > Whatever. But not a bowl of oatmeal.
    >


    I eat it at least 3 times/week. I usually make steel cut oats with some
    dried fruit. Sometimes I prepare the "old fashioned style" rolled oats
    but I like the steel cut texture better.


    > That's what I'm having for breakfast today. I need something
    > to stick to my ribs while I move 21 plus inches of snow off my
    > sidewalk and driveway. If this keeps up, I'm getting a snow
    > blower. This winter and last winter have made up for all the
    > no-snow winters of the last decade.
    > nancy


    They are great for light snow like todays but not so good for wet snow.

  9. #9
    Dora Guest

    Default Re: A bowl of oatmeal

    Nancy Young wrote:
    > That's what I'm having for breakfast today. I need something
    > to stick to my ribs while I move 21 plus inches of snow off my
    > sidewalk and driveway. If this keeps up, I'm getting a snow
    > blower. This winter and last winter have made up for all the
    > no-snow winters of the last decade.
    >
    > nancy


    Nancy, DH would challenge himself by taking on anything. He
    considered a snow blower but they often clog. He finally said to H
    with it and got the local guys to come in - they snow plowed the
    driveway, shoveled off the walks, etc., for $50, while DH sat inside
    in the warm and watched. Think about it.

    Dora


  10. #10
    sf Guest

    Default Re: A bowl of oatmeal

    On Mon, 27 Dec 2010 09:31:28 -0500, "Dora" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Nancy, DH would challenge himself by taking on anything. He
    > considered a snow blower but they often clog. He finally said to H
    > with it and got the local guys to come in - they snow plowed the
    > driveway, shoveled off the walks, etc., for $50, while DH sat inside
    > in the warm and watched. Think about it.


    I agree with your husband. Snow is nice when you're sitting inside
    looking out and not so nice when you have to shovel it every day.

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  11. #11
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: A bowl of oatmeal

    On 27/12/2010 9:31 AM, Dora wrote:

    > Nancy, DH would challenge himself by taking on anything. He considered a
    > snow blower but they often clog. He finally said to H with it and got
    > the local guys to come in - they snow plowed the driveway, shoveled off
    > the walks, etc., for $50, while DH sat inside in the warm and watched.
    > Think about it.
    >


    They do clog with wet, slushy snow. Sometimes you can make one pass
    through the slushy snow, but on the next pass it is pretty well
    guaranteed to clog the chute. The work great on regular snow and with
    the light fluff stuff. You need one with multiple chute controls so that
    you can adjust the height and angle of the discharge. Mine machine can
    easily handle a foot and a half of regular snow. Just set the chute so
    that it is blowing downwind and it will go up and over the driveway as
    you work your way to the leeward side. There are few chores worse than
    snow blowing into the wind and having it blow back on you.

    If you only need to clear snow once every year or two and can get
    someone to do it for $50, that is a bargain..... much cheaper than
    buying and maintaining a blower.

  12. #12
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: A bowl of oatmeal

    Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 27/12/2010 8:58 AM, Nancy Young wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> I live closer to the ocean and we don't usually get the snow amounts
    >> other people do, but the guy across the street got busy a few times
    >> last year with his blower and cleared out our car. I can't expect him to
    >> keep that up. I think getting one is a foregone conclusion at this point.

    >
    >How often would you actually need to use one?
    >I have a good snow blower, and I use it a lot. There have been times
    >when I have had to go out and clear the driveway daily for weeks, and
    >times when I have had to do it more than once per day.
    >
    >If you need.... really need.... a snow blower, it has to be a good one,
    >and they usually cost $1000-1500.


    I'll disagree a little here. For $600-700 you can get a decent
    Ariens 2 stage.

    > They need to be maintained or else
    >they won't work when you need them.


    Say that again. If you don't do it yourself [and it is easy to do
    for $20 or so], plan on spending $100 every September.

    >
    >There are smaller models of snow blowers and those useless semi snow
    >blowers, with gas engines too small to do anything much, or
    >electric..... totally useless.


    I've used single stage gas- and an electric- to keep my 70-80 inches
    of snow a year off my sidewalks and driveway. The driveway is 2 cars
    wide, on a steep hill, and is 100' long or so. The 2 stage is
    definitely easier. [mine is a 1970's model 7 HP Bolens] Especially
    in crusty, or packed snow-- or if the snow is more than a foot deep
    when I get to it.

    But for several years I cleared it all with an electric Toro. I
    still grab the Toro to knock the tops off snowbanks, throw 6" of
    slush, or if my old beast is in need of attention.
    Mine is an older version of this one-
    http://www.amazon.com/Toro-38381-18-...b_title_garden
    $300 for a 18", 15 amp electric- free shipping.

    My 12Amp one cost $300 used- It has been worth every cent of it. In
    very wet snow a single stage throws it further with less clogging than
    any 2 stage I've seen. I can actually empty puddles with my little
    electric.

    >
    >If you live in a climate where it rarely snows, it is likely to be wet,
    >heavy snow. Most snow blowers won't work on that type of snow. It just
    >gets clogged up in the chute.


    2 stage blowers don't--- Single stage eat slush for breakfast. [and
    spit it 40 feet<g>]


    Oh-- and my oatmeal was Irish- boiled it for a few minutes then put it
    in the double boiler to simmer while I blew my snow-- It was ready
    when I was.

    Jim

  13. #13
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: A bowl of oatmeal

    On 27/12/2010 9:40 AM, sf wrote:
    > On Mon, 27 Dec 2010 09:31:28 -0500, "Dora"<[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Nancy, DH would challenge himself by taking on anything. He
    >> considered a snow blower but they often clog. He finally said to H
    >> with it and got the local guys to come in - they snow plowed the
    >> driveway, shoveled off the walks, etc., for $50, while DH sat inside
    >> in the warm and watched. Think about it.

    >
    > I agree with your husband. Snow is nice when you're sitting inside
    > looking out and not so nice when you have to shovel it every day.
    >

    Snow is part of winter here. We expect it. We cope with it. Most of us
    find it much nicer to look out and see white snow than to see dull lawns
    and bare trees. When the sun is shining it seems so much cheerier and it
    feels warmer when there is snow. We have learned to play in the
    snow.... skiing, cross country skiing, skating, toboggining etc. It
    makes winter a lot more fun. We are are used to having to clear snow.
    It is not a big deal.


  14. #14
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: A bowl of oatmeal

    On 2010-12-27, Nancy Young <[email protected]> wrote:

    > to stick to my ribs while I move 21 plus inches of snow off my
    > sidewalk and driveway. If this keeps up, I'm getting a snow
    > blower. This winter and last winter have made up for all the
    > no-snow winters of the last decade.


    YOu must be getting our snow. Eight thousand feet in the heart of the
    CO Rockies, and it's still dry as a bone!

    nb

  15. #15
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: A bowl of oatmeal

    On 27/12/2010 9:52 AM, notbob wrote:

    >
    > YOu must be getting our snow. Eight thousand feet in the heart of the
    > CO Rockies, and it's still dry as a bone!


    I am surprised there is much left after the dumping that southern
    Ontario got last week. I was talking to a friend in London who said that
    he had more than 5 feet of snow on his front lawn. My SiL in Bracebridge
    has close to 3 feet on here lawn. The snow storms missed us. We have
    only 2-3 inches of it. My wife has been shovelling it. If it gets to be
    too much for her to handle I will get the blower out. I am banned from
    shovelling for a while.


  16. #16
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: A bowl of oatmeal

    Nancy Young wrote:
    > I haven't had oatmeal in as long as I can remember, just
    > about. I mean, I've had oatmeal cookies, I've had granola.
    > Whatever. But not a bowl of oatmeal.
    >
    > That's what I'm having for breakfast today. I need something
    > to stick to my ribs while I move 21 plus inches of snow off my
    > sidewalk and driveway. If this keeps up, I'm getting a snow
    > blower. This winter and last winter have made up for all the
    > no-snow winters of the last decade.
    > nancy



    I have about 10" of ice on my roof I'm trying to figure out what to
    do with. It's supposed to warm up above freezing (barely) next
    weekend; maybe I can pull it off then. The roof has a very steep
    pitch and usually ice and snow don't accumulate except at the
    gutters. But we had a heavy sticky wet snow followed by light
    freezing rain, then low temps...

    The snow drifts are about 4 feet deep here, and it's 2 feet deep out
    in the opens. Crazy.

    Lately when I want to have oats in the morning, I put about 1/3 to
    1/2 cup of rolled oats in a bowl and cover them with milk and let
    them soak while I shower and get dressed. Then I stir in just a
    little bit of sweet granola-type cereal such as "Crispy Raisin
    Bran." Kind of like muesli, sort of. (maybe not)

    Bob



  17. #17
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: A bowl of oatmeal

    Dora wrote:
    > Nancy Young wrote:
    >> That's what I'm having for breakfast today. I need something
    >> to stick to my ribs while I move 21 plus inches of snow off my
    >> sidewalk and driveway. If this keeps up, I'm getting a snow
    >> blower. This winter and last winter have made up for all the
    >> no-snow winters of the last decade.


    > Nancy, DH would challenge himself by taking on anything. He
    > considered a snow blower but they often clog. He finally said to H
    > with it and got the local guys to come in - they snow plowed the
    > driveway, shoveled off the walks, etc., for $50, while DH sat inside
    > in the warm and watched. Think about it.


    I'm not adverse to hiring people, that's for sure. We really don't
    generally get a lot of snow, maybe one big storm a year. I know
    my lawn guy would plow, but it was a contract, you paid for him
    for the season, I never asked how much. I'd be happy to pay
    someone $50 at this point.

    I read all the comments on snowblowers, thanks everyone for the
    advice. It's actually why I hate buying stuff like gas chain saws,
    etc., when you need them the (bad word) won't start. Then they
    don't work as well as you'd hoped. But I see that guy across the
    street, I have to find out what he has because he's out there now,
    snow's aflying. We had some heavy snow last year and he didn't
    seem to have a problem with it.

    I tell you, it was nice coming back from vacation last year to 18" of
    dense snow to find our driveway clear. I have to get this guy a
    thank you gift that doesn't say And I expect you to clear my
    driveway from now on.

    nancy, really tired now

  18. #18
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: A bowl of oatmeal

    On Mon, 27 Dec 2010 08:13:26 -0500, Nancy Young wrote:

    > I haven't had oatmeal in as long as I can remember, just
    > about. I mean, I've had oatmeal cookies, I've had granola.
    > Whatever. But not a bowl of oatmeal.
    >
    > That's what I'm having for breakfast today. I need something
    > to stick to my ribs while I move 21 plus inches of snow off my
    > sidewalk and driveway. If this keeps up, I'm getting a snow
    > blower. This winter and last winter have made up for all the
    > no-snow winters of the last decade.
    >
    > nancy


    dear god. that much snow would lead me not to leave the house until the
    liquor ran out.

    your pal,
    blake

  19. #19
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: A bowl of oatmeal

    On Mon, 27 Dec 2010 09:12:39 -0500, Dave Smith
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 27/12/2010 8:58 AM, Nancy Young wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> I live closer to the ocean and we don't usually get the snow amounts
    >> other people do, but the guy across the street got busy a few times
    >> last year with his blower and cleared out our car. I can't expect him to
    >> keep that up. I think getting one is a foregone conclusion at this point.

    >
    >How often would you actually need to use one?
    >I have a good snow blower, and I use it a lot. There have been times
    >when I have had to go out and clear the driveway daily for weeks, and
    >times when I have had to do it more than once per day.
    >
    >If you need.... really need.... a snow blower, it has to be a good one,
    >and they usually cost $1000-1500. They need to be maintained or else
    >they won't work when you need them.


    Well, I hate to sound sexist, but that is guy-talk.

    >There are smaller models of snow blowers and those useless semi snow
    >blowers, with gas engines too small to do anything much, or
    >electric..... totally useless.


    We do not have a large driveway. It fits 4 cars/trucks comfortably. We
    do not have sidewalks. Our snow blower is 2-stage, 24" 5.5 HP
    Craftsman. It has gotten us through a lot of deep and heavy snows. I
    assure you, it was under $600. Anything larger would be absurd over
    here. We've plowed out many a neighbor with it, too.

    It really depends on the size of the area that has to be plowed out
    regularly. If you have a large driveway and sidewalks, then a wider
    and more powerful machine is called for, but believe me, I used to
    regularly handle a driveway twice the size of my current one along 100
    feet of sidewalk and all I used was a Barbie-sized Toro power shovel
    years ago.

    The reason snow blowers come in all sizes is that it makes sense to
    buy one that is suited to the size of the area it will be used upon.
    Not everyone need a ride-on mower, either.
    >
    >If you live in a climate where it rarely snows, it is likely to be wet,
    >heavy snow. Most snow blowers won't work on that type of snow. It just
    >gets clogged up in the chute.


    Here in NJ we can get very wet, heavy snows or light fluffy ones like
    yesterday's. Yesterday's was more the exception. It could have been
    swept away, all 2+ feet of it. Breeze to take care of, the
    shovels-full were light as a feather.

    I am 61 with rheumatoid arthritis, so it isn't as if I am a 24 year
    old ex- college linebacker. Let me tell you, though, there is nothing
    hat causes more laughter than seeing some guy with a small driveway,
    such as I have, roll up the garage door and wheel out a snow blower
    big and powerful enough to clear the parking lot of a ski lodge in
    January.

    >I have a snow blower because I can use it a lot.


    I have one just because I use it. Period. Some years it may get used
    20 times, other years all it does is sit there, get tidied up, have
    the oil checked and the fuel additive dribbled in and maybe its cord
    pulled a couple of times.

    And now, if you'll excuse me, I have to go make more hot chocolate.

    Boron


  20. #20
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: A bowl of oatmeal

    On Mon, 27 Dec 2010 08:52:47 -0500, Dave Smith wrote:

    > On 27/12/2010 8:50 AM, Dave Smith wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Snow blowers are handy to have. If it is just a light snow fall it is
    >> usually easier and faster to use a wide pusher shovel than a blower, but
    >> if there is more than a few inches of snow and it is heavy it is handy
    >> to have a blower. If you are going to get a blower, it may had well be a
    >> big heavy duty model.
    >>

    >
    > ................on the other hand....... if you only get snow once in a
    > while, it is probably cheaper and easier to high a kid or a snow removal
    > service.


    i thought the kids were already high.

    your pal,
    blake

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