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Thread: Boudin

  1. #1
    Steve B Guest

    Default Boudin

    Has anyone here ever made boudin?

    Who knows what it is?

    In Lewis and Clark's diary, they commented on the boudin blanc that the
    French husband of Sacagawea made, and how delicious it was.

    I lived in southern Louisiana for six years, and I love the stuff. I think
    I am going to see about having some shipped to me, but wanted to ask first
    and see if anyone had done this at home.

    Steve

    visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com watch for the book

    A fool shows his annoyance at once, but a prudent man overlooks an insult.



  2. #2
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Boudin

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Steve B" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Has anyone here ever made boudin?
    >
    > Who knows what it is?
    >
    > In Lewis and Clark's diary, they commented on the boudin blanc that the
    > French husband of Sacagawea made, and how delicious it was.
    >
    > I lived in southern Louisiana for six years, and I love the stuff. I think
    > I am going to see about having some shipped to me, but wanted to ask first
    > and see if anyone had done this at home.
    >
    > Steve
    >
    > visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com watch for the book
    >
    > A fool shows his annoyance at once, but a prudent man overlooks an insult.


    Yes, I have and it's delicious smoked. I've been considering a batch
    soon here as dad loves it. I'll use brown rather than white rice tho'.
    It's not hard to make and there are variations of it.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    *Only Irish *coffee provides in a single glass all four *essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar *and fat. --Alex Levine

  3. #3
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Boudin

    On 6/23/2010 12:46 AM, Steve B wrote:
    > Has anyone here ever made boudin?
    >
    > Who knows what it is?
    >
    > In Lewis and Clark's diary, they commented on the boudin blanc that the
    > French husband of Sacagawea made, and how delicious it was.
    >
    > I lived in southern Louisiana for six years, and I love the stuff. I think
    > I am going to see about having some shipped to me, but wanted to ask first
    > and see if anyone had done this at home.
    >
    > Steve
    >
    > visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com watch for the book
    >
    > A fool shows his annoyance at once, but a prudent man overlooks an insult.
    >
    >

    Try this site: http://www.realcajunrecipes.com/arti...kingBoudin.asp

    I like Richards boudin, particularly the hickory smoked type without the
    half-ton of cayenne in it. The make boudin in Lafayette, LA.

    I'm not overly fond of boudin blanc, white boudin doesn't have as much
    flavor as the others in my opinion.

  4. #4
    Steve B Guest

    Default Re: Boudin


    "George Shirley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] ...
    > On 6/23/2010 12:46 AM, Steve B wrote:
    >> Has anyone here ever made boudin?
    >>
    >> Who knows what it is?
    >>
    >> In Lewis and Clark's diary, they commented on the boudin blanc that the
    >> French husband of Sacagawea made, and how delicious it was.
    >>
    >> I lived in southern Louisiana for six years, and I love the stuff. I
    >> think
    >> I am going to see about having some shipped to me, but wanted to ask
    >> first
    >> and see if anyone had done this at home.
    >>
    >> Steve
    >>
    >> visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com watch for the book
    >>
    >> A fool shows his annoyance at once, but a prudent man overlooks an
    >> insult.
    >>
    >>

    > Try this site: http://www.realcajunrecipes.com/arti...kingBoudin.asp
    >
    > I like Richards boudin, particularly the hickory smoked type without the
    > half-ton of cayenne in it. The make boudin in Lafayette, LA.
    >
    > I'm not overly fond of boudin blanc, white boudin doesn't have as much
    > flavor as the others in my opinion.


    I lived in Lafayette for six years. Lots of good food all around there,
    lots of it in Mom and Pops little groceries all over the place. Fresh
    boudin and gratons every day. And don't forget the $3 plate lunches.

    Steve

    visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com

    A fool shows his annoyance at once, but a prudent man overlooks an insult.




  5. #5
    Darren Guest

    Default Re: Boudin

    I love boudin, but wouldn't want to bother making it myself.
    As a transplanted E. Texan now in NY, I found myself missing boudin,
    which is all but impossible to find outside of Louisiana and SE Texas.
    I recently mail-orrdered from a place in Lafayette, LA, called the
    Cajun Grocer.
    The sell all kinds of cajun/creole items including a variety of
    boudin.
    Their service was great, and the boudin arrived frozen in a styrofoam
    container with dry ice.
    I have ordered from them several times so far, and it was a lot easier
    than making boudin myself.


    Darren

  6. #6
    David Westendorf Guest

    Default Re: Boudin

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Steve B" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Has anyone here ever made boudin?
    >
    > Who knows what it is?
    >
    > In Lewis and Clark's diary, they commented on the boudin blanc that the
    > French husband of Sacagawea made, and how delicious it was.
    >
    > I lived in southern Louisiana for six years, and I love the stuff. I think
    > I am going to see about having some shipped to me, but wanted to ask first
    > and see if anyone had done this at home.
    >
    > Steve
    >
    > visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com watch for the book
    >
    > A fool shows his annoyance at once, but a prudent man overlooks an insult.


    I made it once under the supervision of my neighbor,
    who was born and raised in Lafayette, La.

    It was pretty simple. We did it so I could try out the
    grinder attachment on my new mixer. This was boudin
    blanc and the only problem we had was finding pork
    liver so we ended up using calf liver. Still, it turned
    out pretty good. I'd do it again but it appears often
    enough in one of the local stores to quell my boudin
    cravings.

    Dave W.
    In the Ozarks

  7. #7
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Boudin

    On 6/23/2010 12:24 PM, Darren wrote:
    > I love boudin, but wouldn't want to bother making it myself.
    > As a transplanted E. Texan now in NY, I found myself missing boudin,
    > which is all but impossible to find outside of Louisiana and SE Texas.
    > I recently mail-orrdered from a place in Lafayette, LA, called the
    > Cajun Grocer.
    > The sell all kinds of cajun/creole items including a variety of
    > boudin.
    > Their service was great, and the boudin arrived frozen in a styrofoam
    > container with dry ice.
    > I have ordered from them several times so far, and it was a lot easier
    > than making boudin myself.
    >
    >
    > Darren


    I'm from SE Texas Darren, now living in SW Louisiana, and you're exactly
    right. There are many places around the country now selling boudin but
    not all of what they sell is traditional boudin, more's the pity.

  8. #8
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Boudin

    George wrote on Thu, 24 Jun 2010 11:16:40 -0500:

    > On 6/23/2010 12:24 PM, Darren wrote:
    >> I love boudin, but wouldn't want to bother making it myself.
    >> As a transplanted E. Texan now in NY, I found myself missing boudin,
    >> which is all but impossible to find outside of
    >> Louisiana and SE Texas. I recently mail-orrdered from a place
    >> in Lafayette, LA, called the Cajun Grocer. The sell all kinds
    >> of cajun/creole items including a variety of boudin. Their
    >> service was great, and the boudin arrived frozen in a
    >> styrofoam container with dry ice. I have ordered from them
    >> several times so far, and it was a lot easier than making
    >> boudin myself.


    >I'm from SE Texas Darren, now living in SW Louisiana, and you're
    >exactly right. There are many places around the country now selling
    >boudin but not all of what they sell is traditional boudin, more's the
    >pity.


    Perhaps, some of you aficionados can tell me how New Orleans Boudin
    differs from French Boudin Blanc or English White Pudding? There is not
    a New Orleans equivalent of English Black Pudding (blood sausage) is
    there?

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  9. #9
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: Boudin

    On 6/24/2010 11:27 AM, James Silverton wrote:
    > Perhaps, some of you aficionados can tell me how New Orleans Boudin
    > differs from French Boudin Blanc or English White Pudding? There is
    > not a New Orleans equivalent of English Black Pudding (blood sausage)
    > is there?
    >


    Boudin, where I am from, it is pork & rice stuffed into casings. The
    filling reminds me of dirty rice or rice dressing, it has chicken
    livers, celery, onions and peppers along with some garlic. It can be
    spicy or mild. It tastes pretty good, but it depends on who made it. I
    like boudin with lots of green onions. It is not typical for Boudin to
    have blood added to it, I think that is where the different names come from.

    When I was a kid, they served boudin and poboys in your better class of
    gas station.<wink> Now, you get corn dogs. :-(

    Becca

    Becca





  10. #10
    Don Martinich Guest

    Default Re: Boudin

    In article <[email protected]>, Becca <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > On 6/24/2010 11:27 AM, James Silverton wrote:
    > > Perhaps, some of you aficionados can tell me how New Orleans Boudin
    > > differs from French Boudin Blanc or English White Pudding? There is
    > > not a New Orleans equivalent of English Black Pudding (blood sausage)
    > > is there?
    > >

    >
    > Boudin, where I am from, it is pork & rice stuffed into casings. The
    > filling reminds me of dirty rice or rice dressing, it has chicken
    > livers, celery, onions and peppers along with some garlic. It can be
    > spicy or mild. It tastes pretty good, but it depends on who made it. I
    > like boudin with lots of green onions. It is not typical for Boudin to
    > have blood added to it, I think that is where the different names come from.
    >
    > When I was a kid, they served boudin and poboys in your better class of
    > gas station.<wink> Now, you get corn dogs. :-(
    >
    > Becca
    >
    > Becca


    Yes Becca, that is the Boudin that I know and love which I found in and
    around Lafayette, St. Landry, and St. Martin Parishes. I bought my first
    boudin in an old gas station in Henderson. It was served hot and ready
    to eat wrapped in paper. It was excellent, not too spicy, and sold for
    less than a dollar. I found a much spicier version at Johnson's Grocery
    in Eunice. Boudin Noir was available but I didn't try it. I've made it
    at home with excellent results, even with substituting chicken livers
    for pork livers. For a lot more info on Louisiana boudin go to:
    http://www.boudinlink.com/

    D.M.

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