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Thread: Botticelli First Cold Pressed Extra Virgin Olive Oil?

  1. #1
    bumpylight Guest

    Default Botticelli First Cold Pressed Extra Virgin Olive Oil?

    I'm new to olive oil. It's very expensive compared to, say, generic
    canola oil from the supermarket. I just purchased two one-liter
    bottles of Bariani Extra Virgin Olive Oil. I did this after
    considerable research into the many problems associated with buying
    genuine olive oil with to begin, uncontaminated with hazelnut oil or
    cheaper and distinctly inferior olive oils. It has a peppery
    aftertaste, which I understand is good. I don't mind the peppery
    aftertaste at all. I want to like this olive oil. It's all a bit odd.
    Even though the first taste is almost nasty, quite aside from the
    clean peppery aftertaste, I don't dislike it either. I'm tasting it
    one tablespoon at a time, as a health supplement with meals and
    vitamins. Perhaps strong olive oil is an acquired taste. I'm trying a
    tablespoon of it now with a can of Campbell's Condensed Chicken Soup
    and the added water. This should be interesting.

    In any case, I saw today at a Price-Rite a bottle of "Botticelli
    First Cold Pressed Extra Virgin Olive Oil". It says on the label that
    it is "Product of Italy". It's cold pressed, it's apparently from
    Italy and not a hodgepodge of cheap oils from this country and that.
    It's also cheap. One liter for about seven dollars. At least, I think
    it was one liter. This is much less than I paid for the Bariani EVOO.
    Is this a gyp? Is this some kind of fraud for the unwary? What about
    the antioxidant content? Is it likely to suck donkey balls? In short,
    what's the catch?

  2. #2
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Botticelli First Cold Pressed Extra Virgin Olive Oil?

    bumpylight wrote:
    >
    > the antioxidant content? Is it likely to suck donkey balls? In short,
    > what's the catch?


    Do a Google search on "Italy exports more olive oil than".

  3. #3
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Botticelli First Cold Pressed Extra Virgin Olive Oil?

    On Tue, 07 Oct 2008 22:59:52 -0700, Mark Thorson <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >bumpylight wrote:
    >>
    >> the antioxidant content? Is it likely to suck donkey balls? In short,
    >> what's the catch?

    >
    >Do a Google search on "Italy exports more olive oil than".


    Good grief, where did you dredge this post from?


    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

  4. #4
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: Botticelli First Cold Pressed Extra Virgin Olive Oil?

    bumpylight wrote:

    > It has a peppery
    > aftertaste, which I understand is good. I don't mind the peppery
    > aftertaste at all. I want to like this olive oil. It's all a bit odd.
    > Even though the first taste is almost nasty, quite aside from the
    > clean peppery aftertaste, I don't dislike it either. I'm tasting it
    > one tablespoon at a time, as a health supplement with meals and
    > vitamins. Perhaps strong olive oil is an acquired taste. I'm trying a
    > tablespoon of it now with a can of Campbell's Condensed Chicken Soup
    > and the added water. This should be interesting.


    Use it the ways it's meant for: on a slice of toasted bread, maybe after
    rubbing some garlic. On lettuce, or your favorite green-leaf salad, along
    with wine vinegar and salt. As a starter for brasato or stufato: put some
    oil in a pan with finely minced carrot, celery and onion, put a piece of
    meat into it and brown it all and tghen add wine until 2/3 the height of the
    meat chunk (brasato) or some broth to keep it moist, cover and let go on
    very low for 1:30 to 3 or 4 hours, depending on the size and origin of the
    meat. Use it as a base for a pasta sauce: EVO oil, garlic or onion, brown
    them all and add tomato, a bit of salt and you're done, maybe add some
    minced parsley or some basil leaves when you turn off the gas. And lots more
    uses...

    > It's also cheap. One liter for about seven dollars. At least, I think
    > it was one liter. This is much less than I paid for the Bariani EVOO.
    > Is this a gyp? Is this some kind of fraud for the unwary? What about
    > the antioxidant content? Is it likely to suck donkey balls? In short,
    > what's the catch?


    Yes, is it likely to suck donkey balls. Here in Italy a 1 liter bottle of
    EVOO costs about 6 euros, ca. 9 US$, and that's the average EVO oil. The
    good ones, with the "DOP" or "IGT" EU labeling, costs about 10 euros for a 1
    liter bottle and can reach much more if it's from a renowned area as Liguria
    or Garda, which in turn almost never produce 1 liter bottle so you find a
    0,75 liter bottle for 15 - 20 euros.
    But a nice EVO oil from archioni, labeled "DOP" Umbria, costa about 9 euros
    for a 1 liter bottle and it is much much better than the average 6
    euros/liter EVO oils.
    HTH
    --
    Vilco
    Mai guardare Trailer park Boys senza
    qualcosa da bere a portata di mano



  5. #5
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Botticelli First Cold Pressed Extra Virgin Olive Oil?

    "bumpylight"
    I'm new to olive oil. It's very expensive compared to, say, generic
    > canola oil from the supermarket. I just purchased two one-liter
    > bottles of Bariani Extra Virgin Olive Oil. I did this after
    > considerable research into the many problems associated with buying>
    > genuine olive oil with to begin, uncontaminated with hazelnut oil or>
    > cheaper and distinctly inferior olive oils. It has a peppery
    > aftertaste, which I understand is good. I don't mind the peppery
    > aftertaste at all. I want to like this olive oil. It's all a bit odd.

    snippage

    > In any case, I saw today at a Price-Rite a bottle of "Botticelli
    > First Cold Pressed Extra Virgin Olive Oil". It says on the label that
    > it is "Product of Italy".


    Product of Italy doesn't mean that the olives are Italian, but that also
    doesn't mean it will be bad. I never heard of that brand but that doesn't
    mean anything.

    First identify an oil you like then don't care so much where it comes from.
    It isn't medicine, it's food. As long as it is real olive oil, it's
    relatively good for you.
    Second, use it to replace other dats in your diet.
    Third, use it to counteract dietetic problem fats. Olive oil has long been
    used in Italy to ameliorate the bad effects of animal fats, like drizzling
    oil over cooked meats. A few years ago medical studies showed that it is
    effective, which surprised me. I always thought it was a superstition.

    It isn't a magic bullet, but used as part of a healthy diet full of
    vegetables and fruits will keep your cells together in human shape. Enjoy
    it. It isn't a punishment for having eaten hamburgers.



  6. #6
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: Botticelli First Cold Pressed Extra Virgin Olive Oil?

    ViLco wrote:

    > But a nice EVO oil from archioni, labeled "DOP" Umbria, costa about 9


    "acrhioni" should have been "Farchioni"
    --
    Vilco
    Mai guardare Trailer park Boys senza
    qualcosa da bere a portata di mano



  7. #7
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Botticelli First Cold Pressed Extra Virgin Olive Oil?

    Giusi <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Product of Italy doesn't mean that the olives are Italian, but that also
    > doesn't mean it will be bad.


    This brand only uses Italian olives. Or at least that's their
    claim. I'd buy it, just making sure there's a date on it. I got
    burned last week buying a cheap bottle from Cost Plus that had a
    manufacture date of 3 years ago.

    -sw

  8. #8
    bumpylight Guest

    Default Re: Botticelli First Cold Pressed Extra Virgin Olive Oil?

    When I tried the Campbell's Condensed Chicken Soup with added water
    and a tablespoon of the Bariani EVOO, the olive oil did improve the
    flavor. I'll try it in more ways, such as those suggested here.

    What the hell, I'll buy some of the Botticelli EVOO, if it has a
    date on it. I vaguely recall there being a date. It should be okay for
    cooking if nothing else. I'm refraining from using the Bariani with
    anything but very low and quick heat, or fresh from the bottle on
    already cooked food, or in tablespoons, to preserve the antioxidant
    content.

    It's a slow job replacing bad fats with good fats and oils. It means
    giving up some foods and learning to cook different foods in general.

  9. #9
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: Botticelli First Cold Pressed Extra Virgin Olive Oil?

    ViLco wrote:

    > But a nice EVO oil from archioni, labeled "DOP" Umbria, costa about 9


    Is Shelly sick? I miss his remarks about my "guido" typos...
    --
    Vilco
    Mai guardare Trailer park Boys senza
    qualcosa da bere a portata di mano



  10. #10
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Botticelli First Cold Pressed Extra Virgin Olive Oil?

    "ViLco" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:gtkHk.78444$[email protected]..
    > ViLco wrote:
    >
    >> But a nice EVO oil from archioni, labeled "DOP" Umbria, costa about 9

    >
    > Is Shelly sick? I miss his remarks about my "guido" typos...
    > --
    > Vilco


    He has been aiming them at me, but other wrds which I son't recall.

    Coop here has a special on Farchioni for members. euro 3.97 per liter with
    a six bottle limit.



  11. #11
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Botticelli First Cold Pressed Extra Virgin Olive Oil?

    On Thu, 09 Oct 2008 09:50:04 GMT, ViLco wrote:

    > ViLco wrote:
    >
    >> But a nice EVO oil from archioni, labeled "DOP" Umbria, costa about 9

    >
    > Is Shelly sick? I miss his remarks about my "guido" typos...


    sheldon is *always* sick.

    your pal,
    blake

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