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Thread: boozealong recipes

  1. #1
    Kent Guest

    Default boozealong recipes

    Here's a good site for boozealongers. I like the bloody mary.
    http://www.videojug.com/tag/alcoholic-cocktails

    Kent
    --
    ,constantly struggling with my level of ignorance



  2. #2
    sf Guest

    Default Re: boozealong recipes

    On Sat, 6 Feb 2010 00:33:49 -0800, "Kent" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Here's a good site for boozealongers. I like the bloody mary.
    > http://www.videojug.com/tag/alcoholic-cocktails
    >

    Why thank you Kent, how nice of you. Of course, I watched the martini
    video. They claimed it was invented in San Francisco. I had no idea!
    We tend to brag about Irish Coffee.

    FYI: I had my first martini made with Plymouth gin last weekend and
    it was made the way the video shows. I'm not impressed with Plymouth
    though; it doesn't have any flavor. I'll stick with Bombay Sapphire.


    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  3. #3
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: boozealong recipes

    On 2010-02-06, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > it was made the way the video shows. I'm not impressed with Plymouth
    > though; it doesn't have any flavor.


    I call it the Greygoose Syndrome. Refine it to the point it has
    absolutely no flavor whatsoever, so then the X&Y gens will drink it
    and consider themselves cool.

    > I'll stick with Bombay Sapphire.


    Try Boodles. My fave martini gin.

    nb

  4. #4
    Felice Guest

    Default You want a whiskey sour? OK, here it is.

    Having OD'd last night on my late husband's whiskey sours, I'm going to take
    a pass on today's event, but not before passing his recipe on:

    HIMSELF'S WHISKEY SOURS

    In metal part of cocktail shaker set place:

    6 tablespoons superfine sugar
    13 1/2 ounces any ole whiskey
    6 ounces lemon juice (fresh or frozen Minute Maid)
    6-8 ice cubes

    Place glass part of shaker set into top of metal part, flip, and shake until
    sugar is dissolved. Pour through strainer into whiskey sour glasses, into
    each of which you have placed:

    1 maraschino cherry
    1 teaspoon of maraschino cherry juice (the secret ingredient)

    This is the Only Way to make whiskey sours. I will tolerate no variations.

    Have a splendid afternoon!

    Felice



  5. #5
    I am Tosk Guest

    Default Re: boozealong recipes

    In article <hkj9hg$f76$[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...
    >
    > Here's a good site for boozealongers. I like the bloody mary.
    > http://www.videojug.com/tag/alcoholic-cocktails
    >
    > Kent


    Apologies to the group as I may not be able to do the bloody mary
    boozealong. Yesterday I woke up to a blown up laptop and I am using my
    wifes portable with very little software available. I may be able to
    catch up with it this evening.

    Scotty

  6. #6
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: You want a whiskey sour? OK, here it is.


    "Felice" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:hkk9po$u2s$[email protected]..
    > Having OD'd last night on my late husband's whiskey sours, I'm going to
    > take a pass on today's event, but not before passing his recipe on:
    >
    > HIMSELF'S WHISKEY SOURS
    >
    > In metal part of cocktail shaker set place:
    >
    > 6 tablespoons superfine sugar
    > 13 1/2 ounces any ole whiskey
    > 6 ounces lemon juice (fresh or frozen Minute Maid)
    > 6-8 ice cubes
    >
    > Place glass part of shaker set into top of metal part, flip, and shake
    > until sugar is dissolved. Pour through strainer into whiskey sour glasses,
    > into each of which you have placed:
    >
    > 1 maraschino cherry
    > 1 teaspoon of maraschino cherry juice (the secret ingredient)
    >
    > This is the Only Way to make whiskey sours. I will tolerate no variations.
    >


    It's a perfect, classic bartender's recipe.



  7. #7
    Pennyaline Guest

    Default Re: You want a whiskey sour? OK, here it is.

    On 2/6/2010 10:44, Felice wrote:
    > Having OD'd last night on my late husband's whiskey sours, I'm going to take
    > a pass on today's event, but not before passing his recipe on:
    >
    > HIMSELF'S WHISKEY SOURS
    >
    > In metal part of cocktail shaker set place:
    >
    > 6 tablespoons superfine sugar
    > 13 1/2 ounces any ole whiskey
    > 6 ounces lemon juice (fresh or frozen Minute Maid)
    > 6-8 ice cubes
    >
    > Place glass part of shaker set into top of metal part, flip, and shake until
    > sugar is dissolved. Pour through strainer into whiskey sour glasses, into
    > each of which you have placed:
    >
    > 1 maraschino cherry
    > 1 teaspoon of maraschino cherry juice (the secret ingredient)
    >
    > This is the Only Way to make whiskey sours. I will tolerate no variations.
    >
    > Have a splendid afternoon!


    Ooo, I haven't had a good sour in ages!

  8. #8
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: boozealong recipes

    Kent wrote:
    > Here's a good site for boozealongers. I like the bloody mary.
    > http://www.videojug.com/tag/alcoholic-cocktails
    >
    > Kent


    You need a video to make a drink? How lame.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  9. #9
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Gin

    notbob replied to sf about gin:

    >> I'm not impressed with Plymouth though; it doesn't have any flavor.

    >
    > I call it the Greygoose Syndrome. Refine it to the point it has
    > absolutely no flavor whatsoever, so then the X&Y gens will drink it
    > and consider themselves cool.
    >
    >> I'll stick with Bombay Sapphire.

    >
    > Try Boodles. My fave martini gin.


    I think it's interesting that notbob specified "martini" gin, since it seems
    to me that gins vary so much that it might actually make sense to have
    different gins for different drinks. For example, based on what I've read
    recently I think the new Tanqueray Rangpur might be good for gin & tonic,
    but not as good for Ramos gin fizzes.

    In shopping for Delilah ingredients last week I found that there's a much
    greater range of flavors in gins than I'd realized; manufacturers are
    departing quite strongly from the traditional idea of what a gin is supposed
    to be. (I ended up buying a bottle of Citadelle and a bottle of some
    off-brand which I was hoping would taste of juniper and little else.)

    Until last week, I thought that gin could be broken down into two main
    types: English and Dutch. English gin is what most people think of as gin:
    It's a white spirit mainly flavored with juniper, with side notes from other
    flavoring agents. Dutch gin is markedly different from English gin. To start
    with, it's often brown in color, and deeper in flavor. Traditionally, Dutch
    gin is served neat in ceramic cups which are filled to the point where
    surface tension causes the gin to bow out above the rim of the cup. But
    today's gin producers are starting to emphasize the non-juniper flavors in
    gin to the point where it's debatable whether it's still appropriate to call
    the products "gin".

    I don't know the difference between the top-selling gins, e.g., Beefeater,
    Gilbey's, Gordon's, or Seagram's; maybe someone here can expound on the
    qualities of those gins. I am familiar with Tanqueray and Bombay Sapphire,
    but neither of them strike me as something I need to seek out and consume on
    a regular basis. I might just have to buy "airline" bottles of several
    brands to take notes on how they differ. I'm particularly interested in the
    Anchor gins (they make both a Dutch and English version), in the Rogue
    Spirits' gins (both the spruce and the pink spruce), and in the Hendrick's
    gins.

    Bob


  10. #10
    Ron Guest

    Default Re: You want a whiskey sour? OK, here it is.

    On Sat, 6 Feb 2010 12:44:18 -0500, "Felice" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Having OD'd last night on my late husband's whiskey sours, I'm going to take
    >a pass on today's event, but not before passing his recipe on:
    >
    >HIMSELF'S WHISKEY SOURS
    >
    >In metal part of cocktail shaker set place:
    >
    >6 tablespoons superfine sugar
    >13 1/2 ounces any ole whiskey
    >6 ounces lemon juice (fresh or frozen Minute Maid)
    >6-8 ice cubes
    >
    >Place glass part of shaker set into top of metal part, flip, and shake until
    >sugar is dissolved. Pour through strainer into whiskey sour glasses, into
    >each of which you have placed:
    >
    >1 maraschino cherry
    >1 teaspoon of maraschino cherry juice (the secret ingredient)
    >
    >This is the Only Way to make whiskey sours. I will tolerate no variations.
    >
    >Have a splendid afternoon!
    >
    >Felice
    >


    There is one variation I really like... a Tequila Sour. The same
    recipe only substitute Tequilla for the whiskey. Yummy :-)

    Ron Kelley

  11. #11
    Miche Guest

    Default Re: Gin

    In article <00df8494$0$8206$[email protected]>,
    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > I don't know the difference between the top-selling gins, e.g., Beefeater,
    > Gilbey's, Gordon's, or Seagram's; maybe someone here can expound on the
    > qualities of those gins. I am familiar with Tanqueray and Bombay Sapphire,
    > but neither of them strike me as something I need to seek out and consume on
    > a regular basis. I might just have to buy "airline" bottles of several
    > brands to take notes on how they differ. I'm particularly interested in the
    > Anchor gins (they make both a Dutch and English version), in the Rogue
    > Spirits' gins (both the spruce and the pink spruce), and in the Hendrick's
    > gins.


    If you can get it, try South Gin, made in New Zealand. I rather like
    it. It's my preferred choice for gin and tonic.

    http://www.southgin.com

    Miche (no connection with the company other than as a happy consumer of
    the product!)

    --
    Electricians do it in three phases

  12. #12
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Gin

    On Sat, 6 Feb 2010 19:49:32 -0800, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:



    >I think it's interesting that notbob specified "martini" gin, since it seems
    >to me that gins vary so much that it might actually make sense to have
    >different gins for different drinks. For example, based on what I've read
    >recently I think the new Tanqueray Rangpur might be good for gin & tonic,
    >but not as good for Ramos gin fizzes.
    >
    >In shopping for Delilah ingredients last week I found that there's a much
    >greater range of flavors in gins than I'd realized; manufacturers are
    >departing quite strongly from the traditional idea of what a gin is supposed
    >to be. (I ended up buying a bottle of Citadelle and a bottle of some
    >off-brand which I was hoping would taste of juniper and little else.)
    >
    >Until last week, I thought that gin could be broken down into two main
    >types: English and Dutch. English gin is what most people think of as gin:
    >It's a white spirit mainly flavored with juniper, with side notes from other
    >flavoring agents. Dutch gin is markedly different from English gin. To start
    >with, it's often brown in color, and deeper in flavor. Traditionally, Dutch
    >gin is served neat in ceramic cups which are filled to the point where
    >surface tension causes the gin to bow out above the rim of the cup. But
    >today's gin producers are starting to emphasize the non-juniper flavors in
    >gin to the point where it's debatable whether it's still appropriate to call
    >the products "gin".
    >
    >I don't know the difference between the top-selling gins, e.g., Beefeater,
    >Gilbey's, Gordon's, or Seagram's; maybe someone here can expound on the
    >qualities of those gins. I am familiar with Tanqueray and Bombay Sapphire,
    >but neither of them strike me as something I need to seek out and consume on
    >a regular basis. I might just have to buy "airline" bottles of several
    >brands to take notes on how they differ. I'm particularly interested in the
    >Anchor gins (they make both a Dutch and English version), in the Rogue
    >Spirits' gins (both the spruce and the pink spruce), and in the Hendrick's
    >gins.
    >
    >Bob



    I'd use a lesser quality for mixing with anything aside from tonic
    water. That is where Gilbey's, Gordon's, and the like are acceptable.
    For drinking with tonic or as a martini, I like the premium gins. I'd
    never waste Hendricks (my favorite) in some fruity drink. It has a
    nice infusion of flavors that can be appreciated either on ice or with
    some tonic.

    IMO, the Tangueray Rangpur was too heavily lime flavored for my taste.
    Their Malacca, though, is excellent, as is Ten. I'd never turn down
    Bombay, Tangueray, Boodles, Beefeater, or a handful of others in that
    price range. Taste is such a personal thing you'd really have to try
    a few to decide. Like any spirit, the low end tends to have a bit
    more bite, the high end smoother.

  13. #13
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Gin

    Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    > On Sat, 6 Feb 2010 19:49:32 -0800, "Bob Terwilliger"
    > <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >> I think it's interesting that notbob specified "martini" gin, since it seems
    >> to me that gins vary so much that it might actually make sense to have
    >> different gins for different drinks. For example, based on what I've read
    >> recently I think the new Tanqueray Rangpur might be good for gin & tonic,
    >> but not as good for Ramos gin fizzes.
    >>
    >> In shopping for Delilah ingredients last week I found that there's a much
    >> greater range of flavors in gins than I'd realized; manufacturers are
    >> departing quite strongly from the traditional idea of what a gin is supposed
    >> to be. (I ended up buying a bottle of Citadelle and a bottle of some
    >> off-brand which I was hoping would taste of juniper and little else.)
    >>
    >> Until last week, I thought that gin could be broken down into two main
    >> types: English and Dutch. English gin is what most people think of as gin:
    >> It's a white spirit mainly flavored with juniper, with side notes from other
    >> flavoring agents. Dutch gin is markedly different from English gin. To start
    >> with, it's often brown in color, and deeper in flavor. Traditionally, Dutch
    >> gin is served neat in ceramic cups which are filled to the point where
    >> surface tension causes the gin to bow out above the rim of the cup. But
    >> today's gin producers are starting to emphasize the non-juniper flavors in
    >> gin to the point where it's debatable whether it's still appropriate to call
    >> the products "gin".
    >>
    >> I don't know the difference between the top-selling gins, e.g., Beefeater,
    >> Gilbey's, Gordon's, or Seagram's; maybe someone here can expound on the
    >> qualities of those gins. I am familiar with Tanqueray and Bombay Sapphire,
    >> but neither of them strike me as something I need to seek out and consume on
    >> a regular basis. I might just have to buy "airline" bottles of several
    >> brands to take notes on how they differ. I'm particularly interested in the
    >> Anchor gins (they make both a Dutch and English version), in the Rogue
    >> Spirits' gins (both the spruce and the pink spruce), and in the Hendrick's
    >> gins.
    >>
    >> Bob

    >
    >
    > I'd use a lesser quality for mixing with anything aside from tonic
    > water. That is where Gilbey's, Gordon's, and the like are acceptable.
    > For drinking with tonic or as a martini, I like the premium gins. I'd
    > never waste Hendricks (my favorite) in some fruity drink. It has a
    > nice infusion of flavors that can be appreciated either on ice or with
    > some tonic.
    >
    > IMO, the Tangueray Rangpur was too heavily lime flavored for my taste.
    > Their Malacca, though, is excellent, as is Ten. I'd never turn down
    > Bombay, Tangueray, Boodles, Beefeater, or a handful of others in that
    > price range. Taste is such a personal thing you'd really have to try
    > a few to decide. Like any spirit, the low end tends to have a bit
    > more bite, the high end smoother.



    Seagram's or Gordon's is perfect with tonic, but the really cheap
    stuff is passable. Tangueray is better for martinis. I've never
    heard of Dutch gin before, I'll have to look that up.

    BTW, gin tastes nasty (maybe not the high dollar stuff, I dunno),
    and tonic water tastes nasty, but when you mix them together with a
    little lemon or lime it tastes great. I can't figure out how that
    works.

    Bob

  14. #14
    atec 77 Guest

    Default Re: Gin

    Miche wrote:
    > In article <00df8494$0$8206$[email protected]>,
    > "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:
    >
    >> I don't know the difference between the top-selling gins, e.g., Beefeater,
    >> Gilbey's, Gordon's, or Seagram's; maybe someone here can expound on the
    >> qualities of those gins. I am familiar with Tanqueray and Bombay Sapphire,
    >> but neither of them strike me as something I need to seek out and consume on
    >> a regular basis. I might just have to buy "airline" bottles of several
    >> brands to take notes on how they differ. I'm particularly interested in the
    >> Anchor gins (they make both a Dutch and English version), in the Rogue
    >> Spirits' gins (both the spruce and the pink spruce), and in the Hendrick's
    >> gins.

    >
    > If you can get it, try South Gin, made in New Zealand. I rather like
    > it. It's my preferred choice for gin and tonic.
    >
    > http://www.southgin.com
    >
    > Miche (no connection with the company other than as a happy consumer of
    > the product!)
    >

    I prefer my own however it is drinkable

  15. #15
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Gin

    On Sun, 07 Feb 2010 16:50:06 +1000, atec 77 <"atec 77"@hotmail.com>
    wrote:

    >Miche wrote:
    >> In article <00df8494$0$8206$[email protected]>,
    >> "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I don't know the difference between the top-selling gins, e.g., Beefeater,
    >>> Gilbey's, Gordon's, or Seagram's; maybe someone here can expound on the
    >>> qualities of those gins. I am familiar with Tanqueray and Bombay Sapphire,
    >>> but neither of them strike me as something I need to seek out and consume on
    >>> a regular basis. I might just have to buy "airline" bottles of several
    >>> brands to take notes on how they differ. I'm particularly interested in the
    >>> Anchor gins (they make both a Dutch and English version), in the Rogue
    >>> Spirits' gins (both the spruce and the pink spruce), and in the Hendrick's
    >>> gins.

    >>
    >> If you can get it, try South Gin, made in New Zealand. I rather like
    >> it. It's my preferred choice for gin and tonic.
    >>
    >> http://www.southgin.com
    >>
    >> Miche (no connection with the company other than as a happy consumer of
    >> the product!)
    >>

    >I prefer my own however it is drinkable


    Try Blackwoods, made in Shetland



  16. #16
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Gin

    On Sat, 6 Feb 2010 19:49:32 -0800, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > I think it's interesting that notbob specified "martini" gin,


    He specified martini gins because I was talking about a martini.

    > since it seems
    > to me that gins vary so much that it might actually make sense to have
    > different gins for different drinks. For example, based on what I've read
    > recently I think the new Tanqueray Rangpur might be good for gin & tonic,


    Tanqueray is good, but my favorite is for G&T Beefeaters.

    > but not as good for Ramos gin fizzes.


    I haven't had one of those literally in decades. Man, they are good.


    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  17. #17
    atec 77 Guest

    Default Re: Gin

    [email protected] wrote:
    > On Sun, 07 Feb 2010 16:50:06 +1000, atec 77 <"atec 77"@hotmail.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Miche wrote:
    >>> In article <00df8494$0$8206$[email protected]>,
    >>> "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I don't know the difference between the top-selling gins, e.g., Beefeater,
    >>>> Gilbey's, Gordon's, or Seagram's; maybe someone here can expound on the
    >>>> qualities of those gins. I am familiar with Tanqueray and Bombay Sapphire,
    >>>> but neither of them strike me as something I need to seek out and consume on
    >>>> a regular basis. I might just have to buy "airline" bottles of several
    >>>> brands to take notes on how they differ. I'm particularly interested in the
    >>>> Anchor gins (they make both a Dutch and English version), in the Rogue
    >>>> Spirits' gins (both the spruce and the pink spruce), and in the Hendrick's
    >>>> gins.
    >>> If you can get it, try South Gin, made in New Zealand. I rather like
    >>> it. It's my preferred choice for gin and tonic.
    >>>
    >>> http://www.southgin.com
    >>>
    >>> Miche (no connection with the company other than as a happy consumer of
    >>> the product!)
    >>>

    >> I prefer my own however it is drinkable

    >
    > Try Blackwoods, made in Shetland
    >
    >

    I seem to have tried it somewhere , but it's weak at only 50% or so by
    volume and I prefer a stronger drop for economy of time

  18. #18
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Gin

    On Sun, 07 Feb 2010 19:15:32 +1000, atec 77 <"atec 77"@hotmail.com>
    wrote:

    >[email protected] wrote:
    >> On Sun, 07 Feb 2010 16:50:06 +1000, atec 77 <"atec 77"@hotmail.com>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Miche wrote:
    >>>> In article <00df8494$0$8206$[email protected]>,
    >>>> "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> I don't know the difference between the top-selling gins, e.g., Beefeater,
    >>>>> Gilbey's, Gordon's, or Seagram's; maybe someone here can expound on the
    >>>>> qualities of those gins. I am familiar with Tanqueray and Bombay Sapphire,
    >>>>> but neither of them strike me as something I need to seek out and consume on
    >>>>> a regular basis. I might just have to buy "airline" bottles of several
    >>>>> brands to take notes on how they differ. I'm particularly interested in the
    >>>>> Anchor gins (they make both a Dutch and English version), in the Rogue
    >>>>> Spirits' gins (both the spruce and the pink spruce), and in the Hendrick's
    >>>>> gins.
    >>>> If you can get it, try South Gin, made in New Zealand. I rather like
    >>>> it. It's my preferred choice for gin and tonic.
    >>>>
    >>>> http://www.southgin.com
    >>>>
    >>>> Miche (no connection with the company other than as a happy consumer of
    >>>> the product!)
    >>>>
    >>> I prefer my own however it is drinkable

    >>
    >> Try Blackwoods, made in Shetland
    >>
    >>

    >I seem to have tried it somewhere , but it's weak at only 50% or so by
    >volume and I prefer a stronger drop for economy of time



    Have you tried the Bulgarian Absinthe at 85% abv? Drinking that neat
    is only a quicker way to get trollied, it's a real tastebud wrecker.

  19. #19
    atec 77 Guest

    Default Re: Gin

    [email protected] wrote:
    > On Sun, 07 Feb 2010 19:15:32 +1000, atec 77 <"atec 77"@hotmail.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> [email protected] wrote:
    >>> On Sun, 07 Feb 2010 16:50:06 +1000, atec 77 <"atec 77"@hotmail.com>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Miche wrote:
    >>>>> In article <00df8494$0$8206$[email protected]>,
    >>>>> "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> I don't know the difference between the top-selling gins, e.g., Beefeater,
    >>>>>> Gilbey's, Gordon's, or Seagram's; maybe someone here can expound on the
    >>>>>> qualities of those gins. I am familiar with Tanqueray and Bombay Sapphire,
    >>>>>> but neither of them strike me as something I need to seek out and consume on
    >>>>>> a regular basis. I might just have to buy "airline" bottles of several
    >>>>>> brands to take notes on how they differ. I'm particularly interested in the
    >>>>>> Anchor gins (they make both a Dutch and English version), in the Rogue
    >>>>>> Spirits' gins (both the spruce and the pink spruce), and in the Hendrick's
    >>>>>> gins.
    >>>>> If you can get it, try South Gin, made in New Zealand. I rather like
    >>>>> it. It's my preferred choice for gin and tonic.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> http://www.southgin.com
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Miche (no connection with the company other than as a happy consumer of
    >>>>> the product!)
    >>>>>
    >>>> I prefer my own however it is drinkable
    >>> Try Blackwoods, made in Shetland
    >>>
    >>>

    >> I seem to have tried it somewhere , but it's weak at only 50% or so by
    >> volume and I prefer a stronger drop for economy of time

    >
    >
    > Have you tried the Bulgarian Absinthe at 85% abv?

    No cant say I have but I made some Absinthe years back at 90% by volume
    ended to make one pray a little
    Drinking that neat
    > is only a quicker way to get trollied, it's a real tastebud wrecker.

    I stick to my Bourbon these days , over ice with a little something to
    thin it a very palatable drop after aging a couple of months

  20. #20
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Gin

    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    news:00df8494$0$8206$[email protected]
    > notbob replied to sf about gin:
    >
    >>> I'm not impressed with Plymouth though; it doesn't have any flavor.

    >>
    >> I call it the Greygoose Syndrome. Refine it to the point it has
    >> absolutely no flavor whatsoever, so then the X&Y gens will drink it
    >> and consider themselves cool.
    >>
    >>> I'll stick with Bombay Sapphire.

    >>
    >> Try Boodles. My fave martini gin.

    >
    > I think it's interesting that notbob specified "martini" gin, since
    > it seems to me that gins vary so much that it might actually make
    > sense to have different gins for different drinks. For example, based
    > on what I've read recently I think the new Tanqueray Rangpur might be
    > good for gin & tonic, but not as good for Ramos gin fizzes.
    >
    > In shopping for Delilah ingredients last week I found that there's a
    > much greater range of flavors in gins than I'd realized;
    > manufacturers are departing quite strongly from the traditional idea
    > of what a gin is supposed to be. (I ended up buying a bottle of
    > Citadelle and a bottle of some off-brand which I was hoping would
    > taste of juniper and little else.)
    > Until last week, I thought that gin could be broken down into two main
    > types: English and Dutch. English gin is what most people think of as
    > gin: It's a white spirit mainly flavored with juniper, with side
    > notes from other flavoring agents. Dutch gin is markedly different
    > from English gin. To start with, it's often brown in color, and
    > deeper in flavor. Traditionally, Dutch gin is served neat in ceramic
    > cups which are filled to the point where surface tension causes the
    > gin to bow out above the rim of the cup. But today's gin producers
    > are starting to emphasize the non-juniper flavors in gin to the point
    > where it's debatable whether it's still appropriate to call the
    > products "gin".
    > I don't know the difference between the top-selling gins, e.g.,
    > Beefeater, Gilbey's, Gordon's, or Seagram's; maybe someone here can
    > expound on the qualities of those gins.


    I am unable to detect any real difference among those three and they all
    make perfectly good gin and limes. I have tried very expensive gins when
    friends offer but I really see little difference.

    --
    Jim Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland


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