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Thread: Boiling a pot dry

  1. #1
    Zeppo Guest

    Default Boiling a pot dry

    Hi folks,
    I had just put on a covered pot of water to make myself a little oatmeal
    when I received a call from a very distraught family member bearing bad
    news. I walked to the living room to sit down to try to calm the caller and
    my Farberware 3 quart pot boiled dry. It was probably on high for 20 minutes
    or so before I smelled the smell of burning Bakelite and recalled the pot. I
    turned off the stove and let the pot cool down. The stainless pot was
    tinted brown and the inside had black stains on the bottom. The handle was
    loose, too. The lid had a brown tint to it and the handle on that was loose.

    I scrubbed the pot out, and used my dremel with a wire wheel to try to
    polish the bottom and remove stains. The pot appears to be permanently
    discolored. The handles tightened up OK.

    Not too worried about the color but use the 3 qt pot almost every day for
    almost every meal I make. Do you think it's safe to use?

    Jon


  2. #2
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Boiling a pot dry

    On Mar 7, 7:50*am, "Zeppo" <ze...@hotmail.org> wrote:
    > Hi folks,
    > I had just put on a covered pot of water to make myself a little oatmeal
    > when I received a call from a very distraught family member bearing bad
    > news. I walked to the living room to sit down to try to calm the caller and
    > my Farberware 3 quart pot boiled dry. It was probably on high for 20 minutes
    > or so before I smelled the smell of burning Bakelite and recalled the pot.. I
    > turned off the stove and let the pot cool down. The *stainless pot was
    > tinted brown and the inside had black stains on the bottom. The handle was
    > loose, too. The lid had a brown tint to it and the handle on that was loose.
    >
    > I scrubbed the pot out, and used my dremel with a wire wheel to try to
    > polish the bottom and remove stains. The pot appears to be permanently
    > discolored. The handles tightened up OK.
    >
    > Not too worried about the color but use the 3 qt pot almost every day for
    > almost every meal I make. Do you think it's safe to use?
    >


    From experience, yes.

  3. #3
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Boiling a pot dry

    On 2011-03-07, Zeppo <[email protected]> wrote:

    > polish the bottom and remove stains. The pot appears to be permanently
    > discolored. The handles tightened up OK.


    > almost every meal I make. Do you think it's safe to use?


    Yep. I've done that to a couple SS pans. The discoloration is
    permanent, but harmless.

    nb


  4. #4
    J. Clarke Guest

    Default Re: Boiling a pot dry

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > Hi folks,
    > I had just put on a covered pot of water to make myself a little oatmeal
    > when I received a call from a very distraught family member bearing bad
    > news. I walked to the living room to sit down to try to calm the caller and
    > my Farberware 3 quart pot boiled dry. It was probably on high for 20 minutes
    > or so before I smelled the smell of burning Bakelite and recalled the pot. I
    > turned off the stove and let the pot cool down. The stainless pot was
    > tinted brown and the inside had black stains on the bottom. The handle was
    > loose, too. The lid had a brown tint to it and the handle on that was loose.
    >
    > I scrubbed the pot out, and used my dremel with a wire wheel to try to
    > polish the bottom and remove stains. The pot appears to be permanently
    > discolored. The handles tightened up OK.
    >
    > Not too worried about the color but use the 3 qt pot almost every day for
    > almost every meal I make. Do you think it's safe to use?


    If the handle isn't so loose that it's likely to drop 3 quarts of
    boiling water on you, then yes. The brown is normal discoloration of
    steel that gets heated to a particular temperature (a little more it
    would be yellow, a little more than that blue, a little more than that
    gray).

    The discoloration can be sanded or ground off, or you could try a
    cleaning product specifically intended to remove this sort of
    discoloration. "Blue Job" (call around to the motorcycle shops in
    town--one should have it, or you can order it off of Amazon) works about
    as well as any--needs some elbow grease though.


  5. #5
    Sky Guest

    Default Re: Boiling a pot dry

    On 3/7/2011 9:50 AM, Zeppo wrote:
    > Hi folks,
    > I had just put on a covered pot of water to make myself a little oatmeal
    > when I received a call from a very distraught family member bearing bad
    > news. I walked to the living room to sit down to try to calm the caller
    > and my Farberware 3 quart pot boiled dry. It was probably on high for 20
    > minutes or so before I smelled the smell of burning Bakelite and
    > recalled the pot. I turned off the stove and let the pot cool down. The
    > stainless pot was tinted brown and the inside had black stains on the
    > bottom. The handle was loose, too. The lid had a brown tint to it and
    > the handle on that was loose.
    >
    > I scrubbed the pot out, and used my dremel with a wire wheel to try to
    > polish the bottom and remove stains. The pot appears to be permanently
    > discolored. The handles tightened up OK.
    >
    > Not too worried about the color but use the 3 qt pot almost every day
    > for almost every meal I make. Do you think it's safe to use?
    >
    > Jon


    Your experience (BTDT, BTW) is why it's always wise to use the "ULTRA
    Ultimate Kitchen Rule" <VBG> whenever something's cooking on the stove
    or in the oven. That way, the risk of burning something is greatly
    reduced, whether it's the food or the cookware.

    Sky

    --

    Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
    Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice!!

  6. #6
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Boiling a pot dry

    On Mon, 7 Mar 2011 10:50:04 -0500, "Zeppo" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hi folks,
    >I had just put on a covered pot of water to make myself a little oatmeal
    >when I received a call from a very distraught family member bearing bad
    >news. I walked to the living room to sit down to try to calm the caller and
    >my Farberware 3 quart pot boiled dry. It was probably on high for 20 minutes
    >or so before I smelled the smell of burning Bakelite and recalled the pot. I
    >turned off the stove and let the pot cool down. The stainless pot was
    >tinted brown and the inside had black stains on the bottom. The handle was
    >loose, too. The lid had a brown tint to it and the handle on that was loose.
    >
    >I scrubbed the pot out, and used my dremel with a wire wheel to try to
    >polish the bottom and remove stains. The pot appears to be permanently
    >discolored. The handles tightened up OK.
    >
    >Not too worried about the color but use the 3 qt pot almost every day for
    >almost every meal I make. Do you think it's safe to use?
    >
    >Jon


    Consider yourself lucky you hadn't yet added the oatmeal.

    Even if only one third filled it would take a lot longer than 20
    minutes to bring a quart of water to the boil and have it boil dry in
    a covered pot.

    It's very difficult to believe from your description that the aluminum
    cladding at the bottom of that Farberware pot wasn't destroyed... I've
    done that and the aluminum blistered, melted, and separated long
    before the bakelite handles loosened.

  7. #7
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Boiling a pot dry

    On 2011-03-07, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

    > It's very difficult to believe from your description that the aluminum
    > cladding at the bottom of that Farberware pot wasn't destroyed... I've
    > done that and the aluminum blistered, melted, and separated long
    > before the bakelite handles loosened.


    Often, it's sandwiched, in which case the two outside layers of SS
    should hold the alum intact.

    My SS ware has 1/8" copper plates on bottom of pans. I was amazed
    it didn't separate at dull red temp. Sometimes it pays to spend a
    bit extra.

    nb

  8. #8
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Boiling a pot dry

    On 3/7/2011 1:14 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    > On Mon, 7 Mar 2011 10:50:04 -0500, "Zeppo"<[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Hi folks,
    >> I had just put on a covered pot of water to make myself a little oatmeal
    >> when I received a call from a very distraught family member bearing bad
    >> news. I walked to the living room to sit down to try to calm the caller and
    >> my Farberware 3 quart pot boiled dry. It was probably on high for 20 minutes
    >> or so before I smelled the smell of burning Bakelite and recalled the pot. I
    >> turned off the stove and let the pot cool down. The stainless pot was
    >> tinted brown and the inside had black stains on the bottom. The handle was
    >> loose, too. The lid had a brown tint to it and the handle on that was loose.
    >>



    My late MIL did that once with a 1 qt. Farberware. The bottom (outside)
    of the pot melted into a thick round of aluminum (?) that looked like it
    had come from outer space. I don 't know if it did anything to the
    cooktop, but they replaced that soon after.

    gloria p

  9. #9
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Boiling a pot dry

    On Mon, 07 Mar 2011 12:09:48 -0600, Sky <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Your experience (BTDT, BTW) is why it's always wise to use the "ULTRA
    > Ultimate Kitchen Rule" <VBG> whenever something's cooking on the stove
    > or in the oven. That way, the risk of burning something is greatly
    > reduced, whether it's the food or the cookware.
    >
    > Sky
    >
    > --
    >
    > Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
    > Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice!!


    My husband and I swear by the timer. We set it for just a couple of
    minutes to remind us to return and check, because it's all too easy to
    go into another room, start doing something or or get distracted and
    forget all about what's happening in the kitchen.

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  10. #10
    Sky Guest

    Default Re: Boiling a pot dry

    On 3/7/2011 3:13 PM, sf wrote:
    > On Mon, 07 Mar 2011 12:09:48 -0600, Sky<[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Your experience (BTDT, BTW) is why it's always wise to use the "ULTRA
    >> Ultimate Kitchen Rule"<VBG> whenever something's cooking on the stove
    >> or in the oven. That way, the risk of burning something is greatly
    >> reduced, whether it's the food or the cookware.


    > My husband and I swear by the timer. We set it for just a couple of
    > minutes to remind us to return and check, because it's all too easy to
    > go into another room, start doing something or or get distracted and
    > forget all about what's happening in the kitchen.


    And how! That's exactly why I use the timer. If I set a pan of water
    on to boil, I'll set the timer for about 4-minutes or so, etc. That
    way, I can't forget accidentally!!! BTDT (ooops!)

    Sky

    --

    Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
    Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice!!

  11. #11
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: Boiling a pot dry

    On Mar 7, 4:13*pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > On Mon, 07 Mar 2011 12:09:48 -0600, Sky <skyho...@NOsbcglobal.SnPeAtM>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > Your experience (BTDT, BTW) is why it's always wise to use the "ULTRA
    > > Ultimate Kitchen Rule" <VBG> whenever something's cooking on the stove
    > > or in the oven. *That way, the risk of burning something is greatly
    > > reduced, whether it's the food or the cookware.

    >
    > > Sky

    >
    > > --

    >
    > > Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
    > > Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice!!

    >
    > My husband and I swear by the timer. *We set it for just a couple of
    > minutes to remind us to return and check, because it's all too easy to
    > go into another room, start doing something or or get distracted and
    > forget all about what's happening in the kitchen.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.


    I have a belt attachable timer too for this reason if I'm going
    outside for a minute or ten. Small piece of insurance. And I always
    set the stove's timer for anything in the oven. The beep is enough to
    get me off my rear if I've parked self in another room. Senior
    moments can lead to house fires for sure.

    Friend left pot of water on boil and left house for two hours !! Came
    home to cats in a frenzy and the pot reduced to a glob. She was in
    process of changing her kitchen, so at least it happened at a good
    time.

  12. #12
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Boiling a pot dry

    On Mon, 7 Mar 2011 13:31:40 -0800 (PST), Kalmia
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Friend left pot of water on boil and left house for two hours !! Came
    > home to cats in a frenzy and the pot reduced to a glob. She was in
    > process of changing her kitchen, so at least it happened at a good
    > time.


    Boy howdy!

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

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