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Thread: Black eyed peas - the food, not the music group

  1. #1
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Black eyed peas - the food, not the music group

    In my youth, my grandmother prepared black eyed peas fairly often; but,
    always in the same manner. She would dice smoked jowl bacon and saute it
    with small-diced onion; then add the black eyed peas and water and cook
    until tender.

    I would like to prepare black eyed peas sometime this week; however, I'd
    like to try them a different way. What is your favorite recipe for black
    eyed peas?
    --
    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  2. #2
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Black eyed peas - the food, not the music group

    l, not -l <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In my youth, my grandmother prepared black eyed peas fairly often; but,
    >always in the same manner. She would dice smoked jowl bacon and saute it
    >with small-diced onion; then add the black eyed peas and water and cook
    >until tender.


    >I would like to prepare black eyed peas sometime this week; however, I'd
    >like to try them a different way. What is your favorite recipe for black
    >eyed peas?


    Black eyed peas are among the legumes that are available both
    dried and fresh. Which are you starting from? (Even some canned
    black-eyed peas are "fresh" as opposed to previously dried.
    The same is true of canned fava beans... you can get them both
    ways.)

    Steve

  3. #3
    JL Guest

    Default Re: Black eyed peas - the food, not the music group



    l, not -l wrote:
    > In my youth, my grandmother prepared black eyed peas fairly often; but,
    > always in the same manner. She would dice smoked jowl bacon and saute it
    > with small-diced onion; then add the black eyed peas and water and cook
    > until tender.
    >
    > I would like to prepare black eyed peas sometime this week; however, I'd
    > like to try them a different way. What is your favorite recipe for black
    > eyed peas?



    My favorite way of preparing and eating Black Eyed Peas is just plain
    boiled.

    Every time i make a pot of BEP's to use in a more complex dish i have a
    cup full of plain boiled BEP's.

    THen i usually turn the remainder into Hopping John or sometimes a BEP pate.

    I do like them plain as a side with just a bit of cayenne. Serve with
    rice & ham, chicken, fish etc.
    --

    Mr. Joseph Paul Littleshoes Esq.

    Domine, dirige nos.

    Let the games begin!
    http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3


  4. #4
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Black eyed peas - the food, not the music group

    l, not -l <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 9-Oct-2010, [email protected] (Steve Pope) wrote:


    >> Black eyed peas are among the legumes that are available both
    >> dried and fresh. Which are you starting from?


    >Fresh, frozen; not dried.


    Good.

    I like them heated up, then stirred with good EV olive oil and good
    oregano and a little cider vinegar. I think this gives an excellent
    complement to the flavor of the BEP's.

    Whether you add salt depends on how salty the base ingredient already is.

    Steve

  5. #5
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Re: Black eyed peas - the food, not the music group


    On 9-Oct-2010, [email protected] (Steve Pope) wrote:

    > Black eyed peas are among the legumes that are available both
    > dried and fresh. Which are you starting from? (Even some canned
    > black-eyed peas are "fresh" as opposed to previously dried.
    > The same is true of canned fava beans... you can get them both
    > ways.)
    >
    > Steve


    Fresh, frozen; not dried.
    --
    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  6. #6
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Black eyed peas - the food, not the music group

    l wrote:

    >> Black eyed peas are among the legumes that are available both
    >> dried and fresh. Which are you starting from? (Even some canned
    >> black-eyed peas are "fresh" as opposed to previously dried.
    >> The same is true of canned fava beans... you can get them both
    >> ways.)
    >>

    > Fresh, frozen; not dried.


    I like to cook black-eyed peas simply with plenty of water which has been
    seasoned with salt and turmeric. Fresh black-eyed peas will need less
    cooking time than dried, of course, and will have an incomparably better
    texture.

    I also liked the Texas caviar I made for New Year's Day.
    (Message-ID: <00fa14f5$0$6605$[email protected]>)

    Bob



  7. #7
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Black eyed peas - the food, not the music group

    "l, not -l" wrote

    > In my youth, my grandmother prepared black eyed peas fairly often; but,
    > always in the same manner. She would dice smoked jowl bacon and saute it
    > with small-diced onion; then add the black eyed peas and water and cook
    > until tender.


    It's amusing but I have rediscovered this method. Often done with white
    navy beans as well.

    > I would like to prepare black eyed peas sometime this week; however, I'd
    > like to try them a different way. What is your favorite recipe for black
    > eyed peas?


    All mine use dried peas to start with. Thats just me. Canned are ok but
    I'm generally using a crockpot so the slow cook long last with the flavors
    of the spices and broths that grow into the dried ones work best for me.

    Black eyes take well to bioth minimal seasoning, and other stronger ones.
    Cooking liquid can be water but try pork or chicken broth instead for a
    lift. Try curry mixes, jamacian sorts do well. Or go all out garlic with
    slow crockpot cooked whole ones just peeled (15-20) and black pepper.



  8. #8
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Black eyed peas - the food, not the music group

    On 2010-10-09, l, not -l <[email protected]> wrote:

    > always in the same manner. She would dice smoked jowl bacon and saute it
    > with small-diced onion; then add the black eyed peas and water and cook
    > until tender.


    What's smoked jowl bacon?

    > like to try them a different way. What is your favorite recipe for black
    > eyed peas?


    I typically use a smoked hamhock or shank.

    nb

  9. #9
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Re: Black eyed peas - the food, not the music group


    On 10-Oct-2010, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 2010-10-09, l, not -l <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > always in the same manner. She would dice smoked jowl bacon and saute
    > > it
    > > with small-diced onion; then add the black eyed peas and water and cook
    > > until tender.

    >
    > What's smoked jowl bacon?
    >

    IFrom Epicurious:
    The cheek of a hog, which is usually cut into squares before being cured and
    smoked. Hog jowl is generally only available in the South. Tightly wrapped,
    it can be refrigerated for up to a week. It's fattier than bacon but can be
    cut into strips and fried in the same manner. It's also used to flavor
    stews, bean dishes and the like.
    Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995

    --
    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  10. #10
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Black eyed peas - the food, not the music group

    On 2010-10-10, l, not -l <[email protected]> wrote:

    > IFrom Epicurious:


    Actually, I was looking for a little bit of down home enlightenment,
    not a page outta some food dictionary. I tend to assume most folks
    who've discovered how to use such a basic social institution as usenet
    are more than capable of flogging google for info.

    nb

  11. #11
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Re: Black eyed peas - the food, not the music group


    On 10-Oct-2010, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 2010-10-10, l, not -l <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > IFrom Epicurious:

    >
    > Actually, I was looking for a little bit of down home enlightenment,
    > not a page outta some food dictionary. I tend to assume most folks
    > who've discovered how to use such a basic social institution as usenet
    > are more than capable of flogging google for info.
    >
    > nb


    The elementary nature of the question led me to believe you were one of
    those folks who aren't big on self-directed learning. But, here's the down
    home version; cured and smoked pig cheeks, aka hog jowls.
    --
    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  12. #12
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Black eyed peas - the food, not the music group

    On 2010-10-10, l, not -l <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The elementary nature of the question led me to believe you were one of
    > those folks who aren't big on self-directed learning.


    Elementary? What? Asking for some personal insights to a foodstuff
    not common to most of the US is elementary. If so, what's the
    problem? Too tuff fer ya'?

    > But, here's the down home version; cured and smoked pig cheeks, aka
    > hog jowls.


    Gee, that's so much more revealing than the dictionary version. I
    guess I was asking too much in expecting personal experiences like how
    to cook, how long, best method, what to look for in good jowl
    selection, possible seasoning, etc. I apologize for imposing.

    nb

  13. #13
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Re: Black eyed peas - the food, not the music group


    On 10-Oct-2010, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Gee, that's so much more revealing than the dictionary version. I
    > guess I was asking too much in expecting personal experiences like how
    > to cook, how long, best method, what to look for in good jowl
    > selection, possible seasoning, etc.


    If that is what you wanted to know, that is what you should have asked in
    your first post, rather than "what is jowl bacon". Next time, ask what you
    want to know instead of being a putz when someone can't intuit what was on
    your mind.
    --
    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  14. #14
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Black eyed peas - the food, not the music group

    On 2010-10-10, l, not -l <[email protected]> wrote:

    > If that is what you wanted to know, that is what you should have asked in
    > your first post, rather than "what is jowl bacon". Next time, ask what you
    > want to know instead of being a putz when someone can't intuit what was on
    > your mind.


    My point was, anyone can look it up on google. But thank you for
    properly chastising me about the head and shoulders for inquiring
    about a foodstuff 95% of rfc has absolutely no clue about. I hope I
    can someday return the favor, in kind.

    nb

  15. #15
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Black eyed peas - the food, not the music group

    On Sun, 10 Oct 2010 22:49:31 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Gee, that's so much more revealing than the dictionary version. I
    >guess I was asking too much in expecting personal experiences like how
    >to cook, how long, best method, what to look for in good jowl
    >selection, possible seasoning, etc. I apologize for imposing.


    Use it the same way you do ham hocks, nb. It's smoked pork...fatty at
    that...

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  16. #16
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Black eyed peas - the food, not the music group

    On Sun 10 Oct 2010 03:49:31p, notbob told us...

    > On 2010-10-10, l, not -l <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> The elementary nature of the question led me to believe you were
    >> one of those folks who aren't big on self-directed learning.

    >
    > Elementary? What? Asking for some personal insights to a
    > foodstuff not common to most of the US is elementary. If so,
    > what's the problem? Too tuff fer ya'?
    >
    >> But, here's the down home version; cured and smoked pig cheeks,
    >> aka hog jowls.

    >
    > Gee, that's so much more revealing than the dictionary version. I
    > guess I was asking too much in expecting personal experiences like
    > how to cook, how long, best method, what to look for in good jowl
    > selection, possible seasoning, etc. I apologize for imposing.
    >
    > nb


    Actualy, your question, "What's smoked jowl bacon?", didn't imply any
    such detail. If that's what you wanted to know, that's what you
    should have asked.

    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  17. #17
    Default User Guest

    Default Re: Black eyed peas - the food, not the music group

    "l, not -l" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:i8q6em$7li$[email protected]..
    > In my youth, my grandmother prepared black eyed peas fairly often; but,
    > always in the same manner. She would dice smoked jowl bacon and saute it
    > with small-diced onion; then add the black eyed peas and water and cook
    > until tender.
    >
    > I would like to prepare black eyed peas sometime this week; however, I'd
    > like to try them a different way. What is your favorite recipe for black
    > eyed peas?


    It's one of the few legumes that I won't eat. They used to serve them with
    school lunch in Oklahoma. I didn't like them at all. It's possible that if I
    were to try them now I would have a different opinion (tastes do change as
    one ages), but I'm not inclined to risk it.



    Brian
    --
    Day 614 of the "no grouchy usenet posts" project.



  18. #18
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Black eyed peas - the food, not the music group

    "notbob" wrote

    > Actually, I was looking for a little bit of down home enlightenment,
    > not a page outta some food dictionary. I tend to assume most folks
    > who've discovered how to use such a basic social institution as usenet
    > are more than capable of flogging google for info.


    It's the hog's jowls which are much like bacon in some ways as far as 'lots
    of flavor' but it's not quite the same. Often smoke cured with salt and
    black pepper, you find it unrefridgerated in vacum sealed bags. It's
    normally pre-sliced somewhat but can be got whole. It's hard to cut even if
    presliced as it's pretty dense. Unlike bacon, it's partly dehydrated a bit.
    It will hold it's shape for up to 2 days of crockpot cooking. It's favored
    for long cooking items.

    It's terriffic in a bean-pot.


  19. #19
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Black eyed peas - the food, not the music group

    "Christine Dabney" wrote
    > notbob wrote:


    >>Gee, that's so much more revealing than the dictionary version. I
    >>guess I was asking too much in expecting personal experiences like how
    >>to cook, how long, best method, what to look for in good jowl
    >>selection, possible seasoning, etc. I apologize for imposing.

    >
    > Use it the same way you do ham hocks, nb. It's smoked pork...fatty at
    > that...


    Um, not quite. Very different critter from a ham hock, even a smoked one.
    Cooking very different as well but i don't know how to describe the jowl
    well enough. Lets just same the hock becomes a little meat and a sort of
    gelatious fat. The jowl becomes a flavorful fatty slice much the same size
    as added and flavors the rest well, without the 'jello fat' part at all.



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