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Thread: Better at home? Better at restaurant?

  1. #1
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Better at home? Better at restaurant?

    I've contended in the past that some foods are better when prepared at
    home than when you get them in a restaurant. Risotto is an example
    I've cited in particular, because restaurants take shortcuts which
    detract from the quality of the risotto. Paella is a similar story,
    and it pains me to note that many restaurants don't even bother to use
    anything *close* to the right kind of rice for paella, assuming that
    their customers are too ignorant to recognize the difference.

    On the other hand, bouillabaise would be better in a restaurant,
    because in order to make a "proper" bouillabaise you need to make
    enough for more than a dozen people. (Well, maybe it would be
    practical for Ranee to make at *her* home, but not for most of us.)

    Grilled steak is a tossup: If you're in charge of cooking your own
    steak, you can make it *exactly* the way you want it, but that's
    balanced by the fact that restaurants often can get a better quality
    of meat than what is available to consumers, and in many cases
    restaurants have equipment which can create a heating surface much
    hotter than what you can get at home.

    What do you think are other foods which are better at home? What is
    better to order in a restaurant?

    Bob

  2. #2
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Better at home? Better at restaurant?


    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    news[email protected]..
    > I've contended in the past that some foods are better when prepared at
    > home than when you get them in a restaurant. Risotto is an example
    > I've cited in particular, because restaurants take shortcuts which
    > detract from the quality of the risotto. Paella is a similar story,
    > and it pains me to note that many restaurants don't even bother to use
    > anything *close* to the right kind of rice for paella, assuming that
    > their customers are too ignorant to recognize the difference.
    >
    > On the other hand, bouillabaise would be better in a restaurant,
    > because in order to make a "proper" bouillabaise you need to make
    > enough for more than a dozen people. (Well, maybe it would be
    > practical for Ranee to make at *her* home, but not for most of us.)
    >
    > Grilled steak is a tossup: If you're in charge of cooking your own
    > steak, you can make it *exactly* the way you want it, but that's
    > balanced by the fact that restaurants often can get a better quality
    > of meat than what is available to consumers, and in many cases
    > restaurants have equipment which can create a heating surface much
    > hotter than what you can get at home.
    >
    > What do you think are other foods which are better at home? What is
    > better to order in a restaurant?


    In most cases I have found that the food is not better in a restaurant at
    all. I've never been able to make a good grilled cheese or tuna melt at
    home. And really I hate making sandwiches at all. Someone once told me
    that a sandwich always tastes better when someone else makes it. I think
    this is true.



  3. #3
    Pico Rico Guest

    Default Re: Better at home? Better at restaurant?


    Someone once told me
    > that a sandwich always tastes better when someone else makes it. I think
    > this is true.



    you must have missed that Dr. Phil episode, where he was telling the husband
    that he should go out of his way to make his wife feel loved, and then sided
    with her when she told the husband to "make his own damn sandwich" since she
    couldn't be bothered to learn how to make a better sandwich.



  4. #4
    Helpful person Guest

    Default Re: Better at home? Better at restaurant?

    On Oct 10, 12:41*pm, Bob Terwilliger <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz>
    wrote:
    > I've contended in the past that some foods are better when prepared at
    > home than when you get them in a restaurant. Risotto is an example
    > I've cited in particular, because restaurants take shortcuts which
    > detract from the quality of the risotto. Paella is a similar story,
    > and it pains me to note that many restaurants don't even bother to use
    > anything *close* to the right kind of rice for paella, assuming that
    > their customers are too ignorant to recognize the difference.
    >
    > On the other hand, bouillabaise would be better in a restaurant,
    > because in order to make a "proper" bouillabaise you need to make
    > enough for more than a dozen people. (Well, maybe it would be
    > practical for Ranee to make at *her* home, but not for most of us.)
    >
    > Grilled steak is a tossup: If you're in charge of cooking your own
    > steak, you can make it *exactly* the way you want it, but that's
    > balanced by the fact that restaurants often can get a better quality
    > of meat than what is available to consumers, and in many cases
    > restaurants have equipment which can create a heating surface much
    > hotter than what you can get at home.
    >
    > What do you think are other foods which are better at home? What is
    > better to order in a restaurant?
    >
    > Bob


    For me both taste excellent. The reason is that I very rarely order
    at a restaurant what I make at home. I'm very fastidious and am
    nearly always disappointed if I order something that I can cook
    myself.

    I can't speak for risotto as it's not one of my favorites, however I
    take issue with Bouillabaisse. I make my own fish stock and have
    never had anything that comes close at a restaurant.

    http://www.richardfisher.com

  5. #5
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Better at home? Better at restaurant?

    On Mon, 10 Oct 2011 14:37:46 -0700 (PDT), Helpful person
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > For me both taste excellent. The reason is that I very rarely order
    > at a restaurant what I make at home. I'm very fastidious and am
    > nearly always disappointed if I order something that I can cook
    > myself.
    >
    > I can't speak for risotto as it's not one of my favorites, however I
    > take issue with Bouillabaisse. I make my own fish stock and have
    > never had anything that comes close at a restaurant.


    I don't usually order what I make with any regularity at home either,
    but I would order bouillabaisse because I don't make it at home. Same
    with paella (although I haven't had a restaurant version that I like
    yet) and risotto... I love most of the restaurant versions I've had.
    --

    Never commit yourself to a cheese without having first examined it.
    T.S. Eliot

  6. #6
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Better at home? Better at restaurant?

    On 10/10/2011 5:48 PM, sf wrote:
    > On Mon, 10 Oct 2011 14:37:46 -0700 (PDT), Helpful person
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> For me both taste excellent. The reason is that I very rarely order
    >> at a restaurant what I make at home. I'm very fastidious and am
    >> nearly always disappointed if I order something that I can cook
    >> myself.
    >>
    >> I can't speak for risotto as it's not one of my favorites, however I
    >> take issue with Bouillabaisse. I make my own fish stock and have
    >> never had anything that comes close at a restaurant.

    >
    > I don't usually order what I make with any regularity at home either,
    > but I would order bouillabaisse because I don't make it at home. Same
    > with paella (although I haven't had a restaurant version that I like
    > yet) and risotto... I love most of the restaurant versions I've had.


    I've generally found that a lot of Middle Eastern and Indian broiled
    foods taste better at restaurants than when I make them; kebabs and
    tandoori food are examples. The rice they serve is usually better than
    mine too.

    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    I'm *not* [email protected]

  7. #7
    Tara Guest

    Default Re: Better at home? Better at restaurant?

    On Mon, 10 Oct 2011 12:41:46 -0700, Bob Terwilliger
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    >What do you think are other foods which are better at home? What is
    >better to order in a restaurant?


    Restaurants cook seafood much better than I do. I imagine they have
    a source of better seafood along with better equipment and skills. I
    usually order seafood at a restaurant for this reason.

    Tara

  8. #8
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Better at home? Better at restaurant?

    On Mon, 10 Oct 2011 17:56:30 -0400, James Silverton
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I've generally found that a lot of Middle Eastern and Indian broiled
    > foods taste better at restaurants than when I make them; kebabs and
    > tandoori food are examples. The rice they serve is usually better than
    > mine too.


    I've only recently started stuck my toe into the waters of middle
    eastern cooking and don't do Indian at all. They're mainly restaurant
    food for me, but not even once a year. I have a refrigerator *full*
    of western herb & spices, I don't want to procure any more.
    --

    Never commit yourself to a cheese without having first examined it.
    T.S. Eliot

  9. #9
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Better at home? Better at restaurant?

    In article <j6vo3c$qcv$[email protected]>,
    "Pico Rico" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Someone once told me
    > > that a sandwich always tastes better when someone else makes it. I think
    > > this is true.

    >
    >
    > you must have missed that Dr. Phil episode, where he was telling the husband
    > that he should go out of his way to make his wife feel loved, and then sided
    > with her when she told the husband to "make his own damn sandwich" since she
    > couldn't be bothered to learn how to make a better sandwich.


    Is this what people's marital problems really are? For crying out
    loud! Make a nice sandwich for your husband and say thank you for the
    sandwich made for you, is it really that difficult?

    --
    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  10. #10
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Better at home? Better at restaurant?

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Helpful person <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > On the other hand, bouillabaise would be better in a restaurant,
    > > because in order to make a "proper" bouillabaise you need to make
    > > enough for more than a dozen people. (Well, maybe it would be
    > > practical for Ranee to make at *her* home, but not for most of us.)


    LOL! I scoff at recipes that say they serve four and those that use
    8 X 8 pans. We don't even own pans that small.

    At first I couldn't think of dishes that were actually better in a
    restaurant, but now that I've thought a little, I think those things
    which require hard to acquire or store or install equipment. So,
    tandoori, since I don't have a tandoor oven. Although I make a
    delicious faux gyro, making it without the spit is a challenge.

    --
    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  11. #11
    M. JL Esq. Guest

    Default Re: Better at home? Better at restaurant?

    James Silverton wrote:
    > On 10/10/2011 5:48 PM, sf wrote:
    >
    >> Helpful person wrote:


    >>
    >>> For me both taste excellent. The reason is that I very rarely order
    >>> at a restaurant what I make at home. I'm very fastidious and am
    >>> nearly always disappointed if I order something that I can cook
    >>> myself.


    I don't eat at exotic restaurants, and i choose restaurants with menus i
    can understand. Where i have some idea what i order is. Often times
    ordering a "chicken fried steak" if its on the menu, but since moving to
    California i have been so consistently disappointed i had to learn to
    make it myself.

    >>>
    >>> I can't speak for risotto as it's not one of my favorites, however I
    >>> take issue with Bouillabaisse. I make my own fish stock and have
    >>> never had anything that comes close at a restaurant.


    I have never made enough bouillabaisse to get good at it. Plus im on a
    phone tree that alerts me when a certain Lady in Berkeley pulls out her
    big cauldron and starts boiling down her seafood over an open wood fire,
    on her terrace, creating a hugh amount of her locally famous bouillabaisse

    >>
    >>
    >> I don't usually order what I make with any regularity at home either,


    I am often curious about meat loaf on a menu, but i don't patronize
    "chains" or franchises, really don't consider them, along with macdonlds
    & burger king & their ilk "restaurants".

    >> but I would order bouillabaisse because I don't make it at home. Same
    >> with paella (although I haven't had a restaurant version that I like
    >> yet) and risotto... I love most of the restaurant versions I've had.


    There are a number of very complex dishes, recipes i have not even tried
    to make, a few i have like gumbo or an estouffade while .... successful
    and actually quite good, i never the less make so rarely as to be unable
    to claim any expertise in either making or eating them
    ..
    >
    >
    > I've generally found that a lot of Middle Eastern and Indian broiled
    > foods taste better at restaurants than when I make them; kebabs and
    > tandoori food are examples. The rice they serve is usually better than
    > mine too.
    >


    2 thing i consistently notice are French fries and falafel.

    I have never been able to make them at home as well as those produced in
    some restaurants (though better than in others)

    I have been told that many places re use the oil that both the french
    fries and falafel's are deep fried in, and done well, this creates a
    flavour in the foods cooked in the oil that cant be had with one use of
    the oil to cook one batch of food the way i sometimes do at home.
    --
    JL

  12. #12
    Chemo the Clown Guest

    Default Re: Better at home? Better at restaurant?

    On Oct 10, 12:41*pm, Bob Terwilliger <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz>
    wrote:
    > I've contended in the past that some foods are better when prepared at
    > home than when you get them in a restaurant. Risotto is an example
    > I've cited in particular, because restaurants take shortcuts which
    > detract from the quality of the risotto. Paella is a similar story,
    > and it pains me to note that many restaurants don't even bother to use
    > anything *close* to the right kind of rice for paella, assuming that
    > their customers are too ignorant to recognize the difference.
    >
    > On the other hand, bouillabaise would be better in a restaurant,
    > because in order to make a "proper" bouillabaise you need to make
    > enough for more than a dozen people. (Well, maybe it would be
    > practical for Ranee to make at *her* home, but not for most of us.)
    >
    > Grilled steak is a tossup: If you're in charge of cooking your own
    > steak, you can make it *exactly* the way you want it, but that's
    > balanced by the fact that restaurants often can get a better quality
    > of meat than what is available to consumers, and in many cases
    > restaurants have equipment which can create a heating surface much
    > hotter than what you can get at home.
    >
    > What do you think are other foods which are better at home? What is
    > better to order in a restaurant?
    >
    > Bob


    I can't make Thai food for squat so we go out. We make great pizza but
    a local place makes some awesome pizza so we go there once in a while.

  13. #13
    Isaac Gish Guest

    Default Re: Better at home? Better at restaurant?


    'Bob Terwilliger[_1_ Wrote:
    > ;1669960']I've contended in the past that some foods are better when
    > prepared at
    > home than when you get them in a restaurant. Risotto is an example
    > I've cited in particular, because restaurants take shortcuts which
    > detract from the quality of the risotto. Paella is a similar story,
    > and it pains me to note that many restaurants don't even bother to use
    > anything *close* to the right kind of rice for paella, assuming that
    > their customers are too ignorant to recognize the difference.
    >
    > On the other hand, bouillabaise would be better in a restaurant,
    > because in order to make a "proper" bouillabaise you need to make
    > enough for more than a dozen people. (Well, maybe it would be
    > practical for Ranee to make at *her* home, but not for most of us.)
    >
    > Grilled steak is a tossup: If you're in charge of cooking your own
    > steak, you can make it *exactly* the way you want it, but that's
    > balanced by the fact that restaurants often can get a better quality
    > of meat than what is available to consumers, and in many cases
    > restaurants have equipment which can create a heating surface much
    > hotter than what you can get at home.
    >
    > What do you think are other foods which are better at home? What is
    > better to order in a restaurant?
    >
    > Bob



    Ah, i totally agree. Food cooked at home is usually amazing if done
    right. Of course fast food isn't meant for quality, and even at many
    restaurants they have ways to get the more for their buck my giving us
    food that isn't the best quality. Plus, when you cook your own food, you
    decide the ingredients, and you get a sense of accomplishment when it's
    done.




    --
    Isaac Gish

  14. #14
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Better at home? Better at restaurant?

    On Mon, 10 Oct 2011 16:43:55 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Mon, 10 Oct 2011 12:41:46 -0700, Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    >
    >> Grilled steak is a tossup: If you're in charge of cooking your own
    >> steak, you can make it *exactly* the way you want it, but that's
    >> balanced by the fact that restaurants often can get a better quality
    >> of meat than what is available to consumers, and in many cases
    >> restaurants have equipment which can create a heating surface much
    >> hotter than what you can get at home.

    >
    >I have no trouble finding good meat. I can even buy dry aged all
    >natural Choice and Prime at the local mainstream grocer (HEB), along
    >with sub-Select "Budget" beef.
    >
    >Then of course there are the upscale grocers and "Butcher Shops" (like
    >"The Meat House" (not a real butcher).


    In the SFBA there are some really good places to get good meat. And
    there is a brand new butcher shop in the Gourmet Ghetto... If I want
    to, I can find superlative meat in those places...

    As far as cooking steak, there was a long discussion on eGullet
    several years ago about achieving a restaurant quality steak at home.
    I followed that discussion with interest, but never tried the methods
    espoused. However, I recently read a blog post about using such
    methods at home, and the author was really pleased with the results.
    Now, with the prospect of getting some really topnotch meat, and that
    method, I might try it.
    http://thepauperedchef.com/2009/04/t...k-a-steak.html

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  15. #15
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Better at home? Better at restaurant?

    On Mon, 10 Oct 2011 14:48:24 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Same
    >with paella (although I haven't had a restaurant version that I like
    >yet)


    We still have to make paella, when I get back up to the bay area. I
    will be back this coming weekend. I brought my paella book and pan...

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  16. #16
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Better at home? Better at restaurant?

    On Mon, 10 Oct 2011 15:16:07 -0700, Ranée at Arabian Knits
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Although I make a
    >delicious faux gyro, making it without the spit is a challenge.


    Okay, can you post instructions for this?

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  17. #17
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Better at home? Better at restaurant?

    On Mon, 10 Oct 2011 15:05:59 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I've only recently started stuck my toe into the waters of middle
    >eastern cooking


    I just ordered Paula Wolfert's new book, The Food of Morocco, which is
    a redo of her classic Couscous and Other Good Food of Morocco. I
    will be bringing it back with me, to the bay area this coming weekend.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  18. #18
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Better at home? Better at restaurant?

    On Mon, 10 Oct 2011 15:19:45 -0700, "M. JL Esq." <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    > I don't eat at exotic restaurants, and i choose restaurants with menus i
    > can understand. Where i have some idea what i order is. Often times
    > ordering a "chicken fried steak" if its on the menu, but since moving to
    > California i have been so consistently disappointed i had to learn to
    > make it myself.


    I ordered chicken fried steak for the first time to see what that's
    all about. It was good, but it's not good enough to want to make it
    at home... or to even order it again, but my curiosity was satisfied.
    --

    Never commit yourself to a cheese without having first examined it.
    T.S. Eliot

  19. #19
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Better at home? Better at restaurant?

    On Mon, 10 Oct 2011 16:41:46 -0600, Christine Dabney
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Mon, 10 Oct 2011 14:48:24 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Same
    > >with paella (although I haven't had a restaurant version that I like
    > >yet)

    >
    > We still have to make paella, when I get back up to the bay area. I
    > will be back this coming weekend. I brought my paella book and pan...
    >

    Okay, we'll make a date for that! Remember, no shellfish.

    --

    Never commit yourself to a cheese without having first examined it.
    T.S. Eliot

  20. #20
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Better at home? Better at restaurant?

    On Mon, 10 Oct 2011 15:16:07 -0700, Ranée at Arabian Knits
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Although I make a
    > delicious faux gyro, making it without the spit is a challenge.


    Do you make the one with sliced meat? I have never warmed up to the
    meatloaf version.
    --

    Never commit yourself to a cheese without having first examined it.
    T.S. Eliot

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