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Thread: The best loaf of bread I've ever made, ever

  1. #1
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default The best loaf of bread I've ever made, ever

    Reposted from rec.food.sourdough. I've used this homemade starter
    before to sour and flavor a loaf of bread made with instant dried
    yeast because I didn't think it had enough wild yeast to raise the
    dough. But I tried it without yeast this time and worked great, it
    just took longer.

    The bread is soft and kind of chewy, and the crust is thin and
    crunchy. And if it behaves anything like the faux sourdough bread
    I've made before, it'll stay fresh (mostly) for over a week without
    petrifying or molding.

    -Bob

    -------- Original Message --------
    Subject: Finally made some *real* sourdough bread
    Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2011 13:31:27 -0600
    From: zxcvbob <[email protected]>
    Newsgroups: rec.food.sourdough

    The starter was just flour and water that I've been feeding for a
    while. Sometimes I use rye flour, but usually I use all purpose.

    I put a pound of bread flour, and scant tsp of salt dissolved in a
    cup of water in the bread machine. Added about a cup and a half of
    starter, and ran the "dough" cycle. Two hours later, had a nice
    very wet lump of dough that hadn't risen at all yet like it would've
    had I used bakers yeast.

    I turned it out into a greased Corningware casserole dish, then
    flipped it over in the dish (so the top would be greased a little)
    and put the lid on. Checked it an hour or two later and maybe it
    had risen a little if I used my imagination...

    So I let it sit out all night, and by this morning it has risen
    nicely. I didn't dare punch it down. I put the lid on the
    casserole dish and put it in a cold oven and turned the heat to 375.
    Checked at about 35 minutes and it kind of looked done but not
    browned at all and maybe a little moist in the center. I took the
    lid off and baked another 10 minutes. It was nicely browned and
    sounded right when I thumped it. I let it cool a little in the
    dish, then turned it out and put it on a rack to finish cooling. I
    squeezed it a little and the top crust was thin and had a nice crack
    to it. Hopefully there's still some left when I get home :-)

    [snip]

    -Bob

  2. #2
    graham Guest

    Default Re: The best loaf of bread I've ever made, ever


    "zxcvbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Reposted from rec.food.sourdough. I've used this homemade starter before
    > to sour and flavor a loaf of bread made with instant dried yeast because I
    > didn't think it had enough wild yeast to raise the dough. But I tried it
    > without yeast this time and worked great, it just took longer.
    >
    > The bread is soft and kind of chewy, and the crust is thin and crunchy.
    > And if it behaves anything like the faux sourdough bread I've made before,
    > it'll stay fresh (mostly) for over a week without petrifying or molding.
    >
    > -Bob
    >

    Also reposted from rfs:

    These days, for all my free-form loaves, I use the NYT baking method. I heat
    up a Lodge cast iron dutch oven, and lid, in the oven to 450-500F. I then
    tip the proofed dough into it, put on the lid and let it bake for
    ~30minutes. I then remove the lid and bake for another 15-20 minutes,
    depending on the size of the loaf.
    I've had too many failures baking from cold although I know it works for
    some.
    Graham



  3. #3
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: The best loaf of bread I've ever made, ever

    On Feb 1, 6:59*am, "graham" <g.ste...@shaw.ca> wrote:
    > "zxcvbob" <zxcv...@charter.net> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]..> Reposted from rec.food.sourdough.. *I've used this homemade starter before
    > > to sour and flavor a loaf of bread made with instant dried yeast because I
    > > didn't think it had enough wild yeast to raise the dough. *But I tried it
    > > without yeast this time and worked great, it just took longer.

    >
    > > The bread is soft and kind of chewy, and the crust is thin and crunchy.
    > > And if it behaves anything like the faux sourdough bread I've made before,
    > > it'll stay fresh (mostly) for over a week without petrifying or molding..

    >
    > > -Bob

    >
    > Also reposted from rfs:
    >
    > These days, for all my free-form loaves, I use the NYT baking method. I heat
    > up a Lodge cast iron dutch oven, and lid, in the oven to 450-500F. *I then
    > tip the proofed dough into it, put on the lid and let it bake for
    > ~30minutes. *I then remove the lid and bake for another 15-20 minutes,
    > depending on the size of the loaf.
    > I've had too many failures baking from cold although I know it works for
    > some.
    > Graham


    I use the same methodology and my bread comes out wonderfully. You do
    have to make sure you bake it long enough without the lid so that the
    bread doesn't come out 'wet'. I learned that over time.



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