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Thread: Belgian Waffle recipe help please

  1. #1
    meatnub Guest

    Default Belgian Waffle recipe help please

    My Waring Pro Belgian waffle maker comes with some recipes, but I'm
    hesitant to try them per the following: warm milk to 95 - 105 degrees
    (IIRC).

    So.... do I just put the milk in the microwave or warm it on the
    stove? And Does the temperature have to be exactly in this range? I've
    never warmed milk before! :-O

    Right now I'm using a BHG recipe where you basically mix pretty much
    the same ingredients as the Waring Pro recipe: eggs, milk, flour,
    yeast, and there's nothing about letting it sit an hour. You just put
    it right in the fridge.

    I have to make my mixes at night since there's no time in the morning
    before work (and baby). Some of the Waring Pro recipes call for
    letting the yeast/warm milk mixture sit an hour or so, presumably to
    let it rise a little I guess or something. Then add the eggs after. Is
    it OK to make these recipes the night before even though they are not
    "night" recipes? The reason I ask is because they have a specific
    overnight waffle mix, which I think you add the eggs in to the batter
    right before cooking.

    I just want to know if it's OK to make these batters the night before?

    Thanks
    Paul

  2. #2
    Zeppo Guest

    Default Re: Belgian Waffle recipe help please


    "meatnub" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > My Waring Pro Belgian waffle maker comes with some recipes, but I'm
    > hesitant to try them per the following: warm milk to 95 - 105 degrees
    > (IIRC).
    >
    > So.... do I just put the milk in the microwave or warm it on the
    > stove? And Does the temperature have to be exactly in this range? I've
    > never warmed milk before! :-O
    >
    > Right now I'm using a BHG recipe where you basically mix pretty much
    > the same ingredients as the Waring Pro recipe: eggs, milk, flour,
    > yeast, and there's nothing about letting it sit an hour. You just put
    > it right in the fridge.
    >
    > I have to make my mixes at night since there's no time in the morning
    > before work (and baby). Some of the Waring Pro recipes call for
    > letting the yeast/warm milk mixture sit an hour or so, presumably to
    > let it rise a little I guess or something. Then add the eggs after. Is
    > it OK to make these recipes the night before even though they are not
    > "night" recipes? The reason I ask is because they have a specific
    > overnight waffle mix, which I think you add the eggs in to the batter
    > right before cooking.
    >
    > I just want to know if it's OK to make these batters the night before?
    >

    Paul,
    I tried the overnight recipe and wasn't real happy with the results. I've
    never let the regular recipe sit overnight so I can't answer that. Maybe
    give it a try and let us know how it goes. Would you need to refrigerate it
    overnight and then let it warm in the morning? Not sure.

    The milk just needs to be about skin temp, doesn't have to be exact. I
    usually just give it 15 seconds in the microwave.

    I usually restrict making waffles to weekends because of the requirements
    for it to rise for an hour and cleanup afterwards, etc. But go for it, man!

    Good luck,
    Jon



  3. #3
    Zeppo Guest

    Default Re: Belgian Waffle recipe help please


    "meatnub" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > My Waring Pro Belgian waffle maker comes with some recipes, but I'm
    > hesitant to try them per the following: warm milk to 95 - 105 degrees
    > (IIRC).
    >
    > So.... do I just put the milk in the microwave or warm it on the
    > stove? And Does the temperature have to be exactly in this range? I've
    > never warmed milk before! :-O
    >
    > Right now I'm using a BHG recipe where you basically mix pretty much
    > the same ingredients as the Waring Pro recipe: eggs, milk, flour,
    > yeast, and there's nothing about letting it sit an hour. You just put
    > it right in the fridge.
    >
    > I have to make my mixes at night since there's no time in the morning
    > before work (and baby). Some of the Waring Pro recipes call for
    > letting the yeast/warm milk mixture sit an hour or so, presumably to
    > let it rise a little I guess or something. Then add the eggs after. Is
    > it OK to make these recipes the night before even though they are not
    > "night" recipes? The reason I ask is because they have a specific
    > overnight waffle mix, which I think you add the eggs in to the batter
    > right before cooking.
    >
    > I just want to know if it's OK to make these batters the night before?
    >

    Paul,
    I tried the overnight recipe and wasn't real happy with the results. I've
    never let the regular recipe sit overnight so I can't answer that. Maybe
    give it a try and let us know how it goes. Would you need to refrigerate it
    overnight and then let it warm in the morning? Not sure.

    The milk just needs to be about skin temp, doesn't have to be exact. I
    usually just give it 15 seconds in the microwave.

    I usually restrict making waffles to weekends because of the requirements
    for it to rise for an hour and cleanup afterwards, etc. But go for it, man!

    Good luck,
    Jon



  4. #4
    Nexis Guest

    Default Re: Belgian Waffle recipe help please


    "meatnub" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > My Waring Pro Belgian waffle maker comes with some recipes, but I'm
    > hesitant to try them per the following: warm milk to 95 - 105 degrees
    > (IIRC).
    >
    > So.... do I just put the milk in the microwave or warm it on the
    > stove? And Does the temperature have to be exactly in this range? I've
    > never warmed milk before! :-O
    >
    > Right now I'm using a BHG recipe where you basically mix pretty much
    > the same ingredients as the Waring Pro recipe: eggs, milk, flour,
    > yeast, and there's nothing about letting it sit an hour. You just put
    > it right in the fridge.
    >
    > I have to make my mixes at night since there's no time in the morning
    > before work (and baby). Some of the Waring Pro recipes call for
    > letting the yeast/warm milk mixture sit an hour or so, presumably to
    > let it rise a little I guess or something. Then add the eggs after. Is
    > it OK to make these recipes the night before even though they are not
    > "night" recipes? The reason I ask is because they have a specific
    > overnight waffle mix, which I think you add the eggs in to the batter
    > right before cooking.
    >
    > I just want to know if it's OK to make these batters the night before?
    >
    > Thanks
    > Paul


    Listen, do yourself a flavor and get some Carbone's malted flour, then follow the
    recipe on the container. It's very simple, and makes perfect
    tender-on-the-inside-crispy-on-the-outside waffles without fail every time.

    For a special treat...Try Liege Waffles:
    Sugar Waffles from Liege (Luikse Wafels) (Gaufres Liegeoises)

    Batter 1:

    1 1/4 ounces fresh cake yeast or 2 1/2 packages active dry yeast
    1/4 cup warm water (about 100 degrees F)
    1 cup all-purpose flour
    1 tablespoon granulated sugar
    1 large egg, beaten
    1/3 cup milk, warmed to 100 degrees F

    Batter 2:

    9 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature
    6 tablespoons all-purpose flour
    1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    1/4 teaspoon baking powder
    1 teaspoon ground cinnamon (optional)
    pinch of salt
    1 tablespoon granulated sugar
    1/2 cup pearl sugar or 3/4 cup crushed sugar cubes

    Prepare Batter 1: In a small bowl, dissolve the yeast in the warm
    water with 1 tbsp. flour and the sugar. Let stand for 5 minutes
    until foamy. Sift the remaining flour into a large mixing bowl.
    Make a well in the center and add the yeast mixture, egg and milk.
    Mix well with a wooden spoon to make a smooth batter. Cover with
    a kitchen towel and let rise in a warm place until the batter has
    doubled or tripled in volume. Meanwhile, prepare Batter 2: In a
    medium-sized bowl, mix the butter, flour, salt, vanilla, baking
    powder, cinnamon (if using), granulated sugar, and pearl sugar into
    a paste.

    With your hands, work Batter 2 into Batter 1 until well mixed.
    Shape the dough into 10 balls, approximately 2 1/2 to 3 ounces
    each. Flatten each ball into a disk and dust lightly with flour.
    Bake in a medium-hot waffle iron. Don't let the iron become too
    hot or the sugar will burn. Bake until the waffles are golden
    brown but still slightly soft, 3-4 minutes. Serve the sugar waffles
    lukewarm or cooled to room temperature on a rack. Sugar waffles
    will keep well for several days in an airtight container, if you
    manage to have any left over.

    They sound like alot of work, but trust me, they are simple if you follow the recipe
    and *so* worth the effort!
    If you're feeling really and truly decadent, top them with sliced strawberries
    (unsweetened), and a drizzle of bittersweet chocolate. Life's short, eat dessert
    first ;-)

    kimberly


  5. #5
    Nexis Guest

    Default Re: Belgian Waffle recipe help please


    "meatnub" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > My Waring Pro Belgian waffle maker comes with some recipes, but I'm
    > hesitant to try them per the following: warm milk to 95 - 105 degrees
    > (IIRC).
    >
    > So.... do I just put the milk in the microwave or warm it on the
    > stove? And Does the temperature have to be exactly in this range? I've
    > never warmed milk before! :-O
    >
    > Right now I'm using a BHG recipe where you basically mix pretty much
    > the same ingredients as the Waring Pro recipe: eggs, milk, flour,
    > yeast, and there's nothing about letting it sit an hour. You just put
    > it right in the fridge.
    >
    > I have to make my mixes at night since there's no time in the morning
    > before work (and baby). Some of the Waring Pro recipes call for
    > letting the yeast/warm milk mixture sit an hour or so, presumably to
    > let it rise a little I guess or something. Then add the eggs after. Is
    > it OK to make these recipes the night before even though they are not
    > "night" recipes? The reason I ask is because they have a specific
    > overnight waffle mix, which I think you add the eggs in to the batter
    > right before cooking.
    >
    > I just want to know if it's OK to make these batters the night before?
    >
    > Thanks
    > Paul


    Listen, do yourself a flavor and get some Carbone's malted flour, then follow the
    recipe on the container. It's very simple, and makes perfect
    tender-on-the-inside-crispy-on-the-outside waffles without fail every time.

    For a special treat...Try Liege Waffles:
    Sugar Waffles from Liege (Luikse Wafels) (Gaufres Liegeoises)

    Batter 1:

    1 1/4 ounces fresh cake yeast or 2 1/2 packages active dry yeast
    1/4 cup warm water (about 100 degrees F)
    1 cup all-purpose flour
    1 tablespoon granulated sugar
    1 large egg, beaten
    1/3 cup milk, warmed to 100 degrees F

    Batter 2:

    9 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature
    6 tablespoons all-purpose flour
    1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    1/4 teaspoon baking powder
    1 teaspoon ground cinnamon (optional)
    pinch of salt
    1 tablespoon granulated sugar
    1/2 cup pearl sugar or 3/4 cup crushed sugar cubes

    Prepare Batter 1: In a small bowl, dissolve the yeast in the warm
    water with 1 tbsp. flour and the sugar. Let stand for 5 minutes
    until foamy. Sift the remaining flour into a large mixing bowl.
    Make a well in the center and add the yeast mixture, egg and milk.
    Mix well with a wooden spoon to make a smooth batter. Cover with
    a kitchen towel and let rise in a warm place until the batter has
    doubled or tripled in volume. Meanwhile, prepare Batter 2: In a
    medium-sized bowl, mix the butter, flour, salt, vanilla, baking
    powder, cinnamon (if using), granulated sugar, and pearl sugar into
    a paste.

    With your hands, work Batter 2 into Batter 1 until well mixed.
    Shape the dough into 10 balls, approximately 2 1/2 to 3 ounces
    each. Flatten each ball into a disk and dust lightly with flour.
    Bake in a medium-hot waffle iron. Don't let the iron become too
    hot or the sugar will burn. Bake until the waffles are golden
    brown but still slightly soft, 3-4 minutes. Serve the sugar waffles
    lukewarm or cooled to room temperature on a rack. Sugar waffles
    will keep well for several days in an airtight container, if you
    manage to have any left over.

    They sound like alot of work, but trust me, they are simple if you follow the recipe
    and *so* worth the effort!
    If you're feeling really and truly decadent, top them with sliced strawberries
    (unsweetened), and a drizzle of bittersweet chocolate. Life's short, eat dessert
    first ;-)

    kimberly


  6. #6
    JAT23 Guest

    Default Re: Belgian Waffle recipe help please


    > GUEST wrote:
    > My Waring Pro Belgian waffle maker comes with some recipes, but I'm
    > hesitant to try them per the following: warm milk to 95 - 105

    degrees
    > (IIRC).
    >
    > So.... do I just put the milk in the microwave or warm it on the
    > stove? And Does the temperature have to be exactly in this range?

    I've
    > never warmed milk before! :-O
    >
    > Right now I'm using a BHG recipe where you basically mix pretty

    much
    > the same ingredients as the Waring Pro recipe: eggs, milk, flour,
    > yeast, and there's nothing about letting it sit an hour. You just

    put
    > it right in the fridge.
    >
    > I have to make my mixes at night since there's no time in the

    morning
    > before work (and baby). Some of the Waring Pro recipes call for
    > letting the yeast/warm milk mixture sit an hour or so, presumably

    to
    > let it rise a little I guess or something. Then add the eggs after.

    Is
    > it OK to make these recipes the night before even though they are

    not
    > "night" recipes? The reason I ask is because they have a

    specific
    > overnight waffle mix, which I think you add the eggs in to the

    batter
    > right before cooking.
    >
    > I just want to know if it's OK to make these batters the night

    before?
    >
    > Thanks
    > Paul


    It's really tough to get them to come out just like
    they do in Belgium, which is slightly crispy and sweet. Getting the
    "Pearl Sugar" is the hardest part, and since most U.S.
    grocery stores don't stock it I had to order some online. Well worth
    the work though!


  7. #7
    JAT23 Guest

    Default Re: Belgian Waffle recipe help please


    > GUEST wrote:
    > My Waring Pro Belgian waffle maker comes with some recipes, but I'm
    > hesitant to try them per the following: warm milk to 95 - 105

    degrees
    > (IIRC).
    >
    > So.... do I just put the milk in the microwave or warm it on the
    > stove? And Does the temperature have to be exactly in this range?

    I've
    > never warmed milk before! :-O
    >
    > Right now I'm using a BHG recipe where you basically mix pretty

    much
    > the same ingredients as the Waring Pro recipe: eggs, milk, flour,
    > yeast, and there's nothing about letting it sit an hour. You just

    put
    > it right in the fridge.
    >
    > I have to make my mixes at night since there's no time in the

    morning
    > before work (and baby). Some of the Waring Pro recipes call for
    > letting the yeast/warm milk mixture sit an hour or so, presumably

    to
    > let it rise a little I guess or something. Then add the eggs after.

    Is
    > it OK to make these recipes the night before even though they are

    not
    > "night" recipes? The reason I ask is because they have a

    specific
    > overnight waffle mix, which I think you add the eggs in to the

    batter
    > right before cooking.
    >
    > I just want to know if it's OK to make these batters the night

    before?
    >
    > Thanks
    > Paul


    It's really tough to get them to come out just like
    they do in Belgium, which is slightly crispy and sweet. Getting the
    "Pearl Sugar" is the hardest part, and since most U.S.
    grocery stores don't stock it I had to order some online. Well worth
    the work though!


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