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Thread: BBQ

  1. #1
    sf Guest

    Default BBQ


    Watching an old movie "on demand" called Petrified Forest (Betty
    Davis, Leslie Howard) and one of the lines was "What, exactly, is a
    Bar-B-Que?

    LOL, how times have changed!

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  2. #2
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: BBQ


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > Watching an old movie "on demand" called Petrified Forest (Betty
    > Davis, Leslie Howard) and one of the lines was "What, exactly, is a
    > Bar-B-Que?
    >
    > LOL, how times have changed!


    How have they changed? This question came up on another newsgroup and we
    could never agree on an answer. Some say it is the device used for cooking
    the food. Some say it is the type of food served.



  3. #3
    Brian Guest

    Default Re: BBQ

    On Mon, 08 Aug 2011 21:08:43 -0700, sf wrote:

    > Watching an old movie "on demand" called Petrified Forest (Betty Davis,
    > Leslie Howard) and one of the lines was "What, exactly, is a Bar-B-Que?
    >

    What was the answer in the movie?

    Brian Christiansen

  4. #4
    =?iso-8859-1?Q?TFM=AE?= Guest

    Default Re: BBQ

    On Mon, 8 Aug 2011 21:11:40 -0700, Julie Bove wrote:

    > "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >>
    >> Watching an old movie "on demand" called Petrified Forest (Betty
    >> Davis, Leslie Howard) and one of the lines was "What, exactly, is a
    >> Bar-B-Que?
    >>
    >> LOL, how times have changed!

    >
    > How have they changed? This question came up on another newsgroup and we
    > could never agree on an answer. Some say it is the device used for cooking
    > the food. Some say it is the type of food served.


    A barbecue is an event. Not a cooking utensil, nor the food.

    TFM®

  5. #5
    Dave Bugg Guest

    Default Re: BBQ

    TFM® wrote:
    > On Mon, 8 Aug 2011 21:11:40 -0700, Julie Bove wrote:
    >
    >> "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>>
    >>> Watching an old movie "on demand" called Petrified Forest (Betty
    >>> Davis, Leslie Howard) and one of the lines was "What, exactly, is a
    >>> Bar-B-Que?
    >>>
    >>> LOL, how times have changed!

    >>
    >> How have they changed? This question came up on another newsgroup
    >> and we could never agree on an answer. Some say it is the device
    >> used for cooking the food. Some say it is the type of food served.

    >
    > A barbecue is an event. Not a cooking utensil, nor the food.


    Yup. A barbecue is an event, whereas barbecue is the product of a specific
    cooking method.

    --
    Dave
    "A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
    butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
    accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
    give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
    problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
    efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects."-Robert Heinlein



  6. #6
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: BBQ

    TFM® <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message


    >>> Watching an old movie "on demand" called Petrified Forest (Betty
    >>> Davis, Leslie Howard) and one of the lines was "What, exactly, is a
    >>> Bar-B-Que?


    >A barbecue is an event. Not a cooking utensil, nor the food.


    I agree. Whereas "barbecue" (without the indefinite article)
    is a cooking method. "What is a barbecue" is one question;
    "what is barbecue" is a different question with a different
    answer.


    Steve

  7. #7
    Peter Lawrence Guest

    Default Re: BBQ

    On 8/8/11 9:11 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
    > "sf"<[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >>
    >> Watching an old movie "on demand" called Petrified Forest (Betty
    >> Davis, Leslie Howard) and one of the lines was "What, exactly, is a
    >> Bar-B-Que?
    >>
    >> LOL, how times have changed!

    >
    > How have they changed? This question came up on another newsgroup and we
    > could never agree on an answer. Some say it is the device used for cooking
    > the food. Some say it is the type of food served.


    Newsflash: In the English language, a word can have multiple meanings.

    Barbecue is one such word.


    - Peter


  8. #8
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: BBQ


    "TFM®" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Mon, 8 Aug 2011 21:11:40 -0700, Julie Bove wrote:
    >
    >> "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>>
    >>> Watching an old movie "on demand" called Petrified Forest (Betty
    >>> Davis, Leslie Howard) and one of the lines was "What, exactly, is a
    >>> Bar-B-Que?
    >>>
    >>> LOL, how times have changed!

    >>
    >> How have they changed? This question came up on another newsgroup and we
    >> could never agree on an answer. Some say it is the device used for
    >> cooking
    >> the food. Some say it is the type of food served.

    >
    > A barbecue is an event. Not a cooking utensil, nor the food.


    It can be. But people also go to buy a barbecue grill. But then there are
    grills that are not barbecues.

    I remember when I was first married, my MIL and nephew came with me to help
    me move in. We had just gotten military housing. My husband was away at
    school and due to come home that night. My MIL asked what I was making? We
    had only bought enough food for a few days because we had to take them back
    home to PA and were planning to stay there for a few days. So I said I was
    making some sort of pie. I can't remember the name of the recipe. I don't
    think it was cottage pie but it was in an old cookbook. I believe this
    recipe had just ground beef, onions and maybe gravy with a mashed potato
    topping. I don't recall any veggies being in the dish aside from the
    onions. Anyway... She asked me if he liked this? I didn't know. I had
    never made it before. To which she replied... "You should just make a
    barbecue." Yes! *A* barbecue. As if that should have meant something to
    me. It didn't. When I asked her what that was, she just gave me a look
    like I was stupid.

    She knew we didn't own a BBQ grill. So it couldn't have been that. And I
    still don't know what she meant. Although at times I have seen her take
    meat, usually leftover, mix it with BBQ sauce and serve it on Bulky Rolls.
    Perhaps it is a PA food? I think the Bulky Rolls are. We have the same
    sort of looking rolls here but they are called Kaiser. They are like a
    hamburger bun but the top is twisted. And I believe the texture is not as
    soft. Or perhaps I just had stale ones.



  9. #9
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: BBQ


    "Peter Lawrence" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:j1qg4r$fbk$[email protected]..
    > On 8/8/11 9:11 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
    >> "sf"<[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>>
    >>> Watching an old movie "on demand" called Petrified Forest (Betty
    >>> Davis, Leslie Howard) and one of the lines was "What, exactly, is a
    >>> Bar-B-Que?
    >>>
    >>> LOL, how times have changed!

    >>
    >> How have they changed? This question came up on another newsgroup and we
    >> could never agree on an answer. Some say it is the device used for
    >> cooking
    >> the food. Some say it is the type of food served.

    >
    > Newsflash: In the English language, a word can have multiple meanings.
    >
    > Barbecue is one such word.


    Exactly! Which is why I asked her how times have changed.

    I just looked it up on Wikiepedia and it said it could refer to an event,
    the food or the cooking device.

    I am curious to know what was meant in the movie.



  10. #10
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: BBQ



    "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:j1qc1g$uv4$[email protected]..
    >
    > "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >>
    >> Watching an old movie "on demand" called Petrified Forest (Betty
    >> Davis, Leslie Howard) and one of the lines was "What, exactly, is a
    >> Bar-B-Que?
    >>
    >> LOL, how times have changed!

    >
    > How have they changed? This question came up on another newsgroup and we
    > could never agree on an answer. Some say it is the device used for cooking
    > the food. Some say it is the type of food served.


    Or the method of cooking the food?



  11. #11
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: BBQ


    "Ophelia" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    >
    > "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:j1qc1g$uv4$[email protected]..
    >>
    >> "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>>
    >>> Watching an old movie "on demand" called Petrified Forest (Betty
    >>> Davis, Leslie Howard) and one of the lines was "What, exactly, is a
    >>> Bar-B-Que?
    >>>
    >>> LOL, how times have changed!

    >>
    >> How have they changed? This question came up on another newsgroup and we
    >> could never agree on an answer. Some say it is the device used for
    >> cooking the food. Some say it is the type of food served.

    >
    > Or the method of cooking the food?


    That too.



  12. #12
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: BBQ

    On 09/08/2011 12:08 AM, sf wrote:
    >
    > Watching an old movie "on demand" called Petrified Forest (Betty
    > Davis, Leslie Howard) and one of the lines was "What, exactly, is a
    > Bar-B-Que?
    >
    > LOL, how times have changed!
    >


    Around here, A BBQ is an outdoor grill, charcoal or gas, and a BBQ
    dinner is one that has been cooked on the grill. My niece`s husband is
    from North Carolina and according to him, BBQ is not only a particular
    style of outdoor cooker, but a particular meal cooked on it.

  13. #13
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: BBQ

    Dave Smith wrote:

    > Around here, A BBQ is an outdoor grill, charcoal or gas, and a BBQ
    > dinner is one that has been cooked on the grill.


    Same as here.
    --
    ViLco
    Let the liquor do the thinking




  14. #14
    Pico Rico Guest

    Default Re: BBQ


    "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:j1qc1g$uv4$[email protected]..
    >
    > "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >>
    >> Watching an old movie "on demand" called Petrified Forest (Betty
    >> Davis, Leslie Howard) and one of the lines was "What, exactly, is a
    >> Bar-B-Que?
    >>
    >> LOL, how times have changed!

    >
    > How have they changed? This question came up on another newsgroup and we
    > could never agree on an answer. Some say it is the device used for cooking
    > the food. Some say it is the type of food served.


    Times have changed because back then some people didn't know what BBQ was.
    Now everybody knows what it means, but only what it means to themselves, as
    people think it means many different things.



  15. #15
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: BBQ

    Pico Rico wrote:
    > "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:j1qc1g$uv4$[email protected]..
    >>
    >> "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>>
    >>> Watching an old movie "on demand" called Petrified Forest (Betty
    >>> Davis, Leslie Howard) and one of the lines was "What, exactly, is a
    >>> Bar-B-Que?
    >>>
    >>> LOL, how times have changed!

    >>
    >> How have they changed? This question came up on another newsgroup
    >> and we could never agree on an answer. Some say it is the device
    >> used for cooking the food. Some say it is the type of food served.

    >
    > Times have changed because back then some people didn't know what BBQ
    > was. Now everybody knows what it means, but only what it means to
    > themselves, as people think it means many different things.


    Words lke BBQ and B-B-Que and Bar-Be-Que are visual, artifacts of the neon
    sign world. When you say the word barbecue to someone in any context, verb
    or noun, denoting an activity, event, or food, you aren't saying BBQ or
    Bar-B-Que. You are saying either barbecue or barbeque depending on how you
    spell it (the former being correct, of course... heh...). But nobody says
    "bee bee cue".So some of these visually oriented creations aren't really
    part of the discussion, they are just names or sign descriptions of
    businesses and events, a way of condensing a word to make it look better and
    attract attention when promoting something.

    As far as the words barbecue and barbeque, the meaning is flexible and is
    determined by context and syntax.

    And devices used for creating barbecued foods are known as smokers and
    grills. Period.

    ;-)

    Unless it's done in your indoor oven or crockpot, then it is not barbecue.

    <ducking>

    MartyB



  16. #16
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: BBQ

    On Mon, 8 Aug 2011 21:11:40 -0700, Julie Bove wrote:

    > "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >>
    >> Watching an old movie "on demand" called Petrified Forest (Betty
    >> Davis, Leslie Howard) and one of the lines was "What, exactly, is a
    >> Bar-B-Que?
    >>
    >> LOL, how times have changed!

    >
    > How have they changed? This question came up on another newsgroup and we
    > could never agree on an answer. Some say it is the device used for cooking
    > the food. Some say it is the type of food served.


    It's also a social gathering where people cook outdoors. All of them
    are correct.

    The real argument is the distinction between grilling and barbecuing.
    Whichi I don't argue. Call it what you want. I use the term
    "smoking" to describe the process of slow cooking barbecue. It
    doesn't leave room for arguing.

    -sw

    -sw

  17. #17
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: BBQ

    On Tue, 9 Aug 2011 00:58:56 -0400, TFM® wrote:

    > On Mon, 8 Aug 2011 21:11:40 -0700, Julie Bove wrote:
    >
    >> "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>>
    >>> Watching an old movie "on demand" called Petrified Forest (Betty
    >>> Davis, Leslie Howard) and one of the lines was "What, exactly, is a
    >>> Bar-B-Que?
    >>>
    >>> LOL, how times have changed!

    >>
    >> How have they changed? This question came up on another newsgroup and we
    >> could never agree on an answer. Some say it is the device used for cooking
    >> the food. Some say it is the type of food served.

    >
    > A barbecue is an event. Not a cooking utensil, nor the food.


    Not in Pittsburgh. It's cheap, thinly sliced chip chopped ham
    simmered in BBQ sauce and served on a hamburger bun.

    It's an event, a cooking apparatus, and a type of food - often cooked
    in a Crock pot.

    -sw

  18. #18
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: BBQ

    On Tue, 9 Aug 2011 05:11:04 +0000 (UTC), Steve Pope wrote:


    > I agree. Whereas "barbecue" (without the indefinite article)
    > is a cooking method. "What is a barbecue" is one question;
    > "what is barbecue" is a different question with a different
    > answer.


    And this is what makes English the hardest language to learn. There
    are so many unwritten rules and exceptions to the existing rules.

    -sw

  19. #19
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: BBQ

    On Mon, 8 Aug 2011 22:26:31 -0700, Julie Bove wrote:

    > I can't remember the name of the recipe. I don't
    > think it was cottage pie but it was in an old cookbook. I believe this
    > recipe had just ground beef, onions and maybe gravy with a mashed potato
    > topping.


    Shepard's Pie.

    > Yes! *A* barbecue. As if that should have meant something to
    > me. It didn't. When I asked her what that was, she just gave me a look
    > like I was stupid.
    >
    > She knew we didn't own a BBQ grill. So it couldn't have been that. And I
    > still don't know what she meant. Although at times I have seen her take
    > meat, usually leftover, mix it with BBQ sauce and serve it on Bulky Rolls.
    > Perhaps it is a PA food?


    See my previous post for the Eastern PA (at least) definition of
    "barbecue". I don't know if Isaly's had stores/restaurants in
    western PA or not. They are probably more nationally well-known for
    inventing Klondikes

    -sw

  20. #20
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: BBQ

    On Mon, 08 Aug 2011 22:21:30 -0700, Peter Lawrence wrote:


    > Newsflash: In the English language, a word can have multiple meanings.
    >
    > Barbecue is one such word.


    I totally agree. And this one has regional meanings, too. From all
    over the world. I'm kinda sick of hearing the argument.

    -sw

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