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Thread: Basil and keeping it

  1. #1
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Basil and keeping it

    Hello All!

    A number of recipes call for fresh basil but, unless you grow it
    yourself, basil has to be bought in large bunches that are much more
    than you need.For example, you can buy cilantro in bunches for 70-80
    cents but a bunch of basil will cost $2 or more. That much basil is more
    than needed for many recipes (especially Thai). What am I to do?

    --


    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations:
    not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  2. #2
    Tamzen Cannoy Guest

    Default Re: Basil and keeping it

    In article <puR1m.1534$[email protected]>,
    "James Silverton" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Hello All!
    >
    > A number of recipes call for fresh basil but, unless you grow it
    > yourself, basil has to be bought in large bunches that are much more
    > than you need.For example, you can buy cilantro in bunches for 70-80
    > cents but a bunch of basil will cost $2 or more. That much basil is more
    > than needed for many recipes (especially Thai). What am I to do?


    Throw it in the food processor with some good olive oil and freeze it in
    ice cube trays. Then you can pop one of those cubes into anything.

  3. #3
    Mr. Bill Guest

    Default Re: Basil and keeping it

    On Sun, 28 Jun 2009 15:16:13 -0700, Tamzen Cannoy <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >with some good olive oil


    Anyone here use "bad" olive oil?

  4. #4
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Basil and keeping it

    "James Silverton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    newsuR1m.1534$[email protected]..
    > Hello All!
    >
    > A number of recipes call for fresh basil but, unless you grow it yourself,
    > basil has to be bought in large bunches that are much more than you
    > need.For example, you can buy cilantro in bunches for 70-80 cents but a
    > bunch of basil will cost $2 or more. That much basil is more than needed
    > for many recipes (especially Thai). What am I to do?
    >
    > --
    >
    >
    > James Silverton
    > Potomac, Maryland
    >


    Freeze it. Fresh herbs freeze perfectly well.

    Jill


  5. #5
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Basil and keeping it

    James Silverton wrote:
    > Hello All!
    >
    > A number of recipes call for fresh basil but, unless you grow it
    > yourself, basil has to be bought in large bunches that are much more
    > than you need.For example, you can buy cilantro in bunches for 70-80
    > cents but a bunch of basil will cost $2 or more. That much basil is more
    > than needed for many recipes (especially Thai). What am I to do?



    Yep. It's annoying to have to buy a whole bunch of a herb when you only
    need a little. I frequently cook a dish that calls for cilantro and I
    just don't use cilantro in enough things to make it worth buying a whole
    bunch. A buck and a half seems like a lot of expense for a herb when you
    use only 20 cents worth of it. A few years ago I discovered Sabra
    frozen herbs. They come in packages of frozen cubes. It is not quite as
    good as frozen cilantro, but it is better than none at all, and it is a
    heck of a lot cheaper than throwing out 3/4 of a bundle of fresh gone bad.


  6. #6
    Mr. Bill Guest

    Default Re: Basil and keeping it

    On Sun, 28 Jun 2009 19:17:50 -0400, Dave Smith
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > A few years ago I discovered Sabra
    >frozen herbs.


    About thirty years ago, I discovered herbs are perennials. A well
    stocked herb bed will produce for many years. ....with a couple of
    scoops of cow manure.


  7. #7
    bulka Guest

    Default Re: Basil and keeping it

    On Jun 28, 8:21 pm, Mr. Bill <bb0...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Sun, 28 Jun 2009 19:17:50 -0400, Dave Smith
    >
    > <adavid.sm...@sympatico.ca> wrote:
    > > A few years ago I discovered Sabra
    > >frozen herbs.

    >
    > About thirty years ago, I discovered herbs are perennials. A well
    > stocked herb bed will produce for many years. ....with a couple of
    > scoops of cow manure.


    This is my first year trying to get the mints, basils, cilantro, dill,
    catnip, hysop going. So far, so good. But, even if I am a failure
    as a gardener, even if I just harvest the starter plants, I am ahead
    of the grocery store. And then, freezing and drying.

    B

  8. #8
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Basil and keeping it

    James Silverton wrote:
    > Hello All!
    >
    > A number of recipes call for fresh basil but, unless you grow it
    > yourself, basil has to be bought in large bunches that are much more
    > than you need.For example, you can buy cilantro in bunches for 70-80
    > cents but a bunch of basil will cost $2 or more. That much basil is more
    > than needed for many recipes (especially Thai). What am I to do?
    >



    It won't freeze well when dry. IME it turns black and nasty.

    Make pesto and freeze it in ice cube trays or flat in a zip lock bag so
    you can break off what you need.

    If it's just a matter of a few days, wrap it in damp paper towel
    then in a plastic bag in the fridge.

    gloria p

  9. #9
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Basil and keeping it

    Mr. Bill wrote:
    > On Sun, 28 Jun 2009 19:17:50 -0400, Dave Smith
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> A few years ago I discovered Sabra
    >> frozen herbs.

    >
    > About thirty years ago, I discovered herbs are perennials. A well
    > stocked herb bed will produce for many years. ....with a couple of
    > scoops of cow manure.
    >



    Some are true perennials and the plant survives winter. Others seed
    themselves and seem to grow wild. Others need to be planted every year.
    My oregano plant has been around for years and keeps getting bigger and
    bigger, sending out runners. I have to keep trimming the new roots and
    growth. Mint is a gawd damned weed and is very invasive. It should be
    contained with something that the shoots can't go under and high enough
    to stop seeds from falling on the ground around it.

    I don't have to plant cilantro or dill. It just keeps popping up all
    over my herb garden. Basil has to be planted every year. Sometimes the
    curly parsley survives the winter and comes back to life in the spring.
    Some years it doesn't.

  10. #10
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Basil and keeping it

    Mr. Bill wrote:
    > On Sun, 28 Jun 2009 19:17:50 -0400, Dave Smith
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> A few years ago I discovered Sabra
    >> frozen herbs.

    >
    > About thirty years ago, I discovered herbs are perennials. A well
    > stocked herb bed will produce for many years. ....with a couple of
    > scoops of cow manure.
    >



    That depends entirely on your climate. In the Denver area, mint,
    tarragon, thyme, catnip and lovage come up every year but more tender
    herbs like basil, parsley, oregano, and rosemary are annuals here.
    They don't like that one week every winter when it gets to ~20 below
    zero F.

    gloria p

  11. #11
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Basil and keeping it

    James Silverton wrote:
    > Hello All!
    >
    > A number of recipes call for fresh basil but, unless you grow it
    > yourself, basil has to be bought in large bunches that are much more
    > than you need.For example, you can buy cilantro in bunches for 70-80
    > cents but a bunch of basil will cost $2 or more. That much basil is more
    > than needed for many recipes (especially Thai). What am I to do?
    >


    Here's what I do with cilantro and parsley:

    Rinse the herbs and shake them hard to get off most of the excess water.

    Put the entire bundle in a zip lock freezer bag and seal it.

    Freeze it.

    When you need some "fresh" parsley or cilantro, take it out of the bag
    and snip off what you need with kitchen shears onto a sheet of paper
    towels. Let it defrost for a minute or two. The water will be absorbed
    by the paper towels and you will have some nice chopped herbs.

    This works for most uses. I'm sure some folks will find fault with this
    method, but I've been doing it for years and it works for me. YMMV

    Living here in the semi-tropics, there is always basil growing in the
    garden.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  12. #12
    Dale P Guest

    Default Re: Basil and keeping it

    "gloria.p" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:h29ees$f5t$[email protected]..
    > Mr. Bill wrote:
    >> On Sun, 28 Jun 2009 19:17:50 -0400, Dave Smith
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> A few years ago I discovered Sabra frozen herbs.

    >>
    >> About thirty years ago, I discovered herbs are perennials. A well
    >> stocked herb bed will produce for many years. ....with a couple of
    >> scoops of cow manure.

    >
    >
    > That depends entirely on your climate. In the Denver area, mint, tarragon,
    > thyme, catnip and lovage come up every year but more tender herbs like
    > basil, parsley, oregano, and rosemary are annuals here.
    > They don't like that one week every winter when it gets to ~20 below zero
    > F.
    >
    > gloria p


    Gloria,

    I agree with you completely, but both my flat leaf and my curly parsley came
    back this spring like crazy. We have been doing a little traveling, and I
    have to just chop it back and throw it away, so I get the new tender shoots.
    I have my basil going well for this year. I love chives, and it grows very
    well, and I can usually harvest some almost year round.

    Have you been to the new Houston's Denver for dinner. We went Saturday, and
    it was very good. A few rough edges still, they really should be doing
    better. We have enjoyed Houston's in other cities. Overall, it was an
    excellent meal.

    DP



  13. #13
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Basil and keeping it

    On Sun, 28 Jun 2009 18:41:04 -0400, Mr. Bill <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sun, 28 Jun 2009 15:16:13 -0700, Tamzen Cannoy <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>with some good olive oil

    >
    >Anyone here use "bad" olive oil?


    There's good and then there's better, but it's never bad unless it's
    rancid.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  14. #14
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Basil and keeping it

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Mr. Bill <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sun, 28 Jun 2009 19:17:50 -0400, Dave Smith
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > A few years ago I discovered Sabra
    > >frozen herbs.

    >
    > About thirty years ago, I discovered herbs are perennials. A well
    > stocked herb bed will produce for many years. ....with a couple of
    > scoops of cow manure.


    Good concept (I have an herb bed too) but Basil is an annual.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
    It's about learning to dance in the rain.
    -- Anon.

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  15. #15
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: Basil and keeping it

    Dave Smith wrote:

    > I don't have to plant cilantro or dill. It just keeps popping up all
    > over my herb garden. Basil has to be planted every year. Sometimes the
    > curly parsley survives the winter and comes back to life in the
    > spring. Some years it doesn't.


    You must be getting sweeter winters than me here in Italy, my parsley has
    never made it to spring. The best ones are rosemary and sage, both big and
    strong. Then, every year I plant new parsley and basil seedlings, this year
    the basil is "Pra", the one grown in Liguria for pesto.
    --
    Vilco
    Mai guardare Trailer park Boys senza
    qualcosa da bere a portata di mano




  16. #16
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Basil and keeping it


    "bulka" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Jun 28, 8:21 pm, Mr. Bill <bb0...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >> On Sun, 28 Jun 2009 19:17:50 -0400, Dave Smith
    >>
    >> <adavid.sm...@sympatico.ca> wrote:
    >> > A few years ago I discovered Sabra
    >> >frozen herbs.

    >>
    >> About thirty years ago, I discovered herbs are perennials. A well
    >> stocked herb bed will produce for many years. ....with a couple of
    >> scoops of cow manure.

    >
    > This is my first year trying to get the mints, basils, cilantro, dill,
    > catnip, hysop going. So far, so good. But, even if I am a failure
    > as a gardener, even if I just harvest the starter plants, I am ahead
    > of the grocery store. And then, freezing and drying.
    >
    >


    Many of the common herbs folks like to use fresh are annuals, like basil.
    And many are bienniels like parsley. Parsley will come up the second year
    but is really too bitter for culinary use... plant parsley fresh each year.
    I like the curly parsley better than flat leaf. I no longer plant basil,
    it's not an important herb in my cooking. Also be very diligent with
    planting many herbs, they are very invasive anything in the mint family.
    And dill is extremely invasive as its seeds spread far and wide, also
    fennel. With planting an herb garden know what you're doing or your
    neighbors will want to plant you.




  17. #17
    Silvar Beitel Guest

    Default Re: Basil and keeping it

    On Jun 28, 5:43 pm, "James Silverton" <not.jim.silver...@verizon.not>
    wrote:
    > Hello All!
    >
    > A number of recipes call for fresh basil but, unless you grow it
    > yourself, basil has to be bought in large bunches that are much more
    > than you need.For example, you can buy cilantro in bunches for 70-80
    > cents but a bunch of basil will cost $2 or more. That much basil is more
    > than needed for many recipes (especially Thai). What am I to do?


    Pull the leaves off, stick them flat in a baggie, squeeze all the air
    out, seal, and freeze. (Or, obviously, use one of those suck 'n' seal
    setups - I don't have one.)

    Nothing will replace fresh basil in, say, salads or fresh spring
    rolls, but frozen works just fine in cooked dishes. Flavor is as good
    as fresh.

    Works for any fresh herb.

    --
    Silvar Beitel
    (looking forward to vast quantities of fresh basil from the garden, if
    it would ever stop raining around here :-) )

  18. #18
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Basil and keeping it

    Dale P wrote:

    >
    > Have you been to the new Houston's Denver for dinner. We went Saturday,
    > and it was very good. A few rough edges still, they really should be
    > doing better. We have enjoyed Houston's in other cities. Overall, it
    > was an excellent meal.
    >
    > DP




    No I haven't. We were on vacation just after it opened and I hadn't
    heard much about it. It's in Cherry Creek north, right? We're in the
    S.E. burbs of Denver and don't get into the city very often.

    Thanks for the recommendation. I'll keep it in mind.

    gloria p

  19. #19
    Elder Guest

    Default Re: Basil and keeping it

    In article <puR1m.1534$[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > A number of recipes call for fresh basil but, unless you grow it
    > yourself, basil has to be bought in large bunches that are much more
    > than you need.
    >

    So grow it, take one of the stems, stand it in a glass of water for
    about 6 weeks until it roots.

    Plant it in good compost in a pot, you may find it tries to flower,
    pinch it out and it grows more leaf "branches" with less plant height.
    --
    Carl Robson
    Get cashback on your purchases
    Topcashback http://www.TopCashBack.co.uk/skraggy_uk/ref/index.htm
    Greasypalm http://www.greasypalm.co.uk/r/?l=1006553

  20. #20
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Basil and keeping it

    Elder wrote on Mon, 29 Jun 2009 20:27:04 +0100:

    > In article <puR1m.1534$[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] says...
    >> A number of recipes call for fresh basil but, unless you grow
    >> it yourself, basil has to be bought in large bunches that are
    >> much more than you need.
    >>

    > So grow it, take one of the stems, stand it in a glass of
    > water for about 6 weeks until it roots.


    With me, in a glass it will dry out or rot. Outside, the horn-rats will
    eat it!

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


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