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Thread: baking soda II

  1. #1
    nefletch Guest

    Default baking soda II

    Ok, I will admit I was a bit lazy in my last question. And
    not being a chemist by trade, I was wondering about ph
    levels. I was looking at a youtube clip showing a guy
    blowing a hard boiled egg out of its shell, not peeling it.
    In the clip he stated you should put baking soda in the
    water to lower the ph level in the membrane, and thus
    making it easier to blow it out. ( I was a bit skeptical ,
    but tried it anyway. My original question should have
    been a bit clearer, in asking if baking powder can be used
    here, versus baking soda. In reading the article, I am
    going to assume I could use baking powder, as I didn't
    have baking soda on hand. Thank you.



  2. #2
    RegForte Guest

    Default Re: baking soda II

    nefletch wrote:

    > Ok, I will admit I was a bit lazy in my last question. And
    > not being a chemist by trade, I was wondering about ph
    > levels. I was looking at a youtube clip showing a guy
    > blowing a hard boiled egg out of its shell, not peeling it.
    > In the clip he stated you should put baking soda in the
    > water to lower the ph level in the membrane, and thus
    > making it easier to blow it out. ( I was a bit skeptical ,
    > but tried it anyway. My original question should have
    > been a bit clearer, in asking if baking powder can be used
    > here, versus baking soda. In reading the article, I am
    > going to assume I could use baking powder, as I didn't
    > have baking soda on hand. Thank you.
    >
    >


    Given that baking soda is a base and not an
    acid, adding it will raise, not lower, the pH.
    You have it turned around.

    From what it sounds like you're trying to do, I
    doubt baking powder will produce identical
    results.

  3. #3
    Blinky the Shark Guest

    Default Re: baking soda II

    nefletch wrote:

    > In the clip he stated you should put baking soda in the water to lower
    > the ph level in the membrane, and thus making it easier to blow it out.
    > ( I was a bit skeptical , but tried it anyway.


    So did it work?

    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups -
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org


  4. #4
    nefletch Guest

    Default Re: baking soda II

    I couldn't get the egg to blow out, but it did "inflate" the
    sack, and it was very easy to remove the shell, and had
    no tears in the egg itself... very smooth


    "Blinky the Shark" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected] t...
    > nefletch wrote:
    >
    >> In the clip he stated you should put baking soda in the water to lower
    >> the ph level in the membrane, and thus making it easier to blow it out.
    >> ( I was a bit skeptical , but tried it anyway.

    >
    > So did it work?
    >
    > --
    > Blinky
    > Killing all posts from Google Groups -
    > The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org
    >




  5. #5
    Dave Bell Guest

    Default Re: baking soda II

    nefletch wrote:
    > I couldn't get the egg to blow out, but it did "inflate" the
    > sack, and it was very easy to remove the shell, and had
    > no tears in the egg itself... very smooth
    >
    >
    > "Blinky the Shark" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news[email protected] t...
    >> nefletch wrote:
    >>
    >>> In the clip he stated you should put baking soda in the water to lower
    >>> the ph level in the membrane, and thus making it easier to blow it out.
    >>> ( I was a bit skeptical , but tried it anyway.

    >> So did it work?


    I have to check this out... I *hate* peeling hard-boiled eggs!

    Baking powder should result in close to neutral pH effect, being a
    pretty well balanced mixture of base (baking soda, sodium bicarbonate)
    and tartaric acid. Baking soda was probably intended, so as to raise the
    pH and modify the membrane.

    By the way, imagine my confusion following your questions, when I read
    your first entry here:
    "Ok, I will admit I was a bit lazy in my last question. And
    not being a chemist by trade, I was wondering about ph
    levels."
    Confused, because I missed the "not" !

    Dave

  6. #6
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: baking soda II


    "nefletch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] scommunications...
    > Ok, I will admit I was a bit lazy in my last question. And
    > not being a chemist by trade, I was wondering about ph
    > levels. I was looking at a youtube clip showing a guy
    > blowing a hard boiled egg out of its shell, not peeling it.
    > In the clip he stated you should put baking soda in the
    > water to lower the ph level in the membrane, and thus
    > making it easier to blow it out. ( I was a bit skeptical ,
    > but tried it anyway. My original question should have
    > been a bit clearer, in asking if baking powder can be used
    > here, versus baking soda.


    NO! Baking powder contains acid, usually in the form of cream of tartar
    which causes a chemical reaction rendering the alkaline in the baking soda
    less powerful.

    Dimitri


  7. #7
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: baking soda II

    Dimitri wrote:
    >
    > "nefletch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected] scommunications...
    >> Ok, I will admit I was a bit lazy in my last question. And
    >> not being a chemist by trade, I was wondering about ph
    >> levels. I was looking at a youtube clip showing a guy
    >> blowing a hard boiled egg out of its shell, not peeling it.
    >> In the clip he stated you should put baking soda in the
    >> water to lower the ph level in the membrane, and thus
    >> making it easier to blow it out. ( I was a bit skeptical ,
    >> but tried it anyway. My original question should have
    >> been a bit clearer, in asking if baking powder can be used
    >> here, versus baking soda.

    >
    > NO! Baking powder contains acid, usually in the form of cream of tartar
    > which causes a chemical reaction rendering the alkaline in the baking
    > soda less powerful.
    >
    > Dimitri


    Back in my Home-Ec days we were taught about the actions of these
    ingredients which are- Baking powder recipes act on heat, Baking soda
    recipes act on acid.

  8. #8
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: baking soda II


    "Goomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Dimitri wrote:
    >>
    >> "nefletch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected] scommunications...
    >>> Ok, I will admit I was a bit lazy in my last question. And
    >>> not being a chemist by trade, I was wondering about ph
    >>> levels. I was looking at a youtube clip showing a guy
    >>> blowing a hard boiled egg out of its shell, not peeling it.
    >>> In the clip he stated you should put baking soda in the
    >>> water to lower the ph level in the membrane, and thus
    >>> making it easier to blow it out. ( I was a bit skeptical ,
    >>> but tried it anyway. My original question should have
    >>> been a bit clearer, in asking if baking powder can be used
    >>> here, versus baking soda.

    >>
    >> NO! Baking powder contains acid, usually in the form of cream of tartar
    >> which causes a chemical reaction rendering the alkaline in the baking
    >> soda less powerful.
    >>
    >> Dimitri

    >
    > Back in my Home-Ec days we were taught about the actions of these
    > ingredients which are- Baking powder recipes act on heat, Baking soda
    > recipes act on acid.


    I think that was an oversimplification although I am sure it's true.

    The acid in the powder starts an immediate reaction when mixed with the soda
    & liquid. It's the # 1 reason to pre-heat your oven.

    baking powder

    A LEAVENER containing a combination of baking soda, an acid (such as CREAM
    OF TARTAR) and a moisture-absorber (such as cornstarch). When mixed with
    liquid, baking powder releases carbon dioxide gas bubbles that cause a bread
    or cake to rise. There are three basic kinds of baking powder. The most
    common is double-acting, which releases some gas when it becomes wet and the
    rest when exposed to oven heat. Single-acting tartrate and phosphate baking
    powders (hard to find in most American markets because of the popularity of
    double-acting baking powder) release their gases as soon as they're
    moistened. Because it's perishable, baking powder should be kept in a cool,
    dry place. Always check the date on the bottom of a baking-powder can before
    purchasing it. To test if a baking powder still packs a punch, combine 1
    teaspoon of it with 1/3 cup hot water. If it bubbles enthusiastically, it's
    fine.
    Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD
    LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.


  9. #9
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: baking soda II

    Dimitri wrote:

    >> Back in my Home-Ec days we were taught about the actions of these
    >> ingredients which are- Baking powder recipes act on heat, Baking soda
    >> recipes act on acid.

    >
    > I think that was an oversimplification although I am sure it's true.
    >
    > The acid in the powder starts an immediate reaction when mixed with the
    > soda & liquid. It's the # 1 reason to pre-heat your oven.


    It was about as much as most 7th grade girls had patience to learn, I
    suppose?
    I recall the lecture expanded on it some in warning to not mix up
    batters with these agents and let the batter sit around or you'd lose
    effectiveness.
    Goomba

  10. #10
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: baking soda II


    "Goomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Dimitri wrote:
    >
    >>> Back in my Home-Ec days we were taught about the actions of these
    >>> ingredients which are- Baking powder recipes act on heat, Baking soda
    >>> recipes act on acid.

    >>
    >> I think that was an oversimplification although I am sure it's true.
    >>
    >> The acid in the powder starts an immediate reaction when mixed with the
    >> soda & liquid. It's the # 1 reason to pre-heat your oven.

    >
    > It was about as much as most 7th grade girls had patience to learn, I
    > suppose?
    > I recall the lecture expanded on it some in warning to not mix up batters
    > with these agents and let the batter sit around or you'd lose
    > effectiveness.
    > Goomba


    Seventh Grade I think we were studying transubstantiation or getting the tar
    beat out of us. I forget which

    :-)

    Dimitri


  11. #11
    RegForte Guest

    Default Re: baking soda II

    Goomba wrote:

    > It was about as much as most 7th grade girls had patience to learn, I
    > suppose?
    > I recall the lecture expanded on it some in warning to not mix up
    > batters with these agents and let the batter sit around or you'd lose
    > effectiveness.
    > Goomba


    Yes, you hear that about double acting baking powder. It fits with
    the theory behind it.

    After baking many different products over the years, some right after
    mixing and some much later, I've never had a baking powder leavened
    product rise any less because of a delay sitting around before cooking.
    I conclude from this that most of the leavening action in double
    acting baking powder comes from applying heat.

  12. #12
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: baking soda II


    "RegForte" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:1lrfl.18892$[email protected]..
    > Goomba wrote:
    >
    >> It was about as much as most 7th grade girls had patience to learn, I
    >> suppose?
    >> I recall the lecture expanded on it some in warning to not mix up batters
    >> with these agents and let the batter sit around or you'd lose
    >> effectiveness.
    >> Goomba

    >
    > Yes, you hear that about double acting baking powder. It fits with
    > the theory behind it.
    >
    > After baking many different products over the years, some right after
    > mixing and some much later, I've never had a baking powder leavened
    > product rise any less because of a delay sitting around before cooking.
    > I conclude from this that most of the leavening action in double
    > acting baking powder comes from applying heat.


    double-acting, which releases some gas when it becomes wet and the rest when
    exposed to oven heat. Single-acting tartrate and phosphate baking powders
    (hard to find in most American markets because of the popularity of
    double-acting baking powder) release their gases as soon as they're
    moistened.

    Dimitri


  13. #13
    RegForte Guest

    Default Re: baking soda II

    Dimitri wrote:
    >
    > "RegForte" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:1lrfl.18892$[email protected]..
    >
    >> After baking many different products over the years, some right after
    >> mixing and some much later, I've never had a baking powder leavened
    >> product rise any less because of a delay sitting around before cooking.
    >> I conclude from this that most of the leavening action in double
    >> acting baking powder comes from applying heat.

    >
    >
    > double-acting, which releases some gas when it becomes wet and the rest
    > when exposed to oven heat. Single-acting tartrate and phosphate baking
    > powders (hard to find in most American markets because of the popularity
    > of double-acting baking powder) release their gases as soon as they're
    > moistened.



    Yes. I'm familiar with the theoretical part.

    What I'm saying is that I've found through experimentation
    that most of the leavening action comes from heat side of
    the equation.

  14. #14
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: baking soda II


    "RegForte" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:Bwrfl.9499$[email protected]..
    > Dimitri wrote:
    >>
    >> "RegForte" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:1lrfl.18892$[email protected]..
    >>
    >>> After baking many different products over the years, some right after
    >>> mixing and some much later, I've never had a baking powder leavened
    >>> product rise any less because of a delay sitting around before cooking.
    >>> I conclude from this that most of the leavening action in double
    >>> acting baking powder comes from applying heat.

    >>
    >>
    >> double-acting, which releases some gas when it becomes wet and the rest
    >> when exposed to oven heat. Single-acting tartrate and phosphate baking
    >> powders (hard to find in most American markets because of the popularity
    >> of double-acting baking powder) release their gases as soon as they're
    >> moistened.

    >
    >
    > Yes. I'm familiar with the theoretical part.
    >
    > What I'm saying is that I've found through experimentation
    > that most of the leavening action comes from heat side of
    > the equation.


    If one could discount the steam produced in the baking process there might
    be a way to verify what you are saying, However if you let a batter rest for
    several hours and then bake it I suspect you'll see how it ends up.

    I guess pancake batter made fresh and batter from the day before would give
    some comparison. I wonder just how stable wet cream of Tartar is.

    Dimitri


  15. #15
    RegForte Guest

    Default Re: baking soda II

    Dimitri wrote:

    >
    > "RegForte" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:Bwrfl.9499$[email protected]..
    >


    >> Yes. I'm familiar with the theoretical part.
    >>
    >> What I'm saying is that I've found through experimentation
    >> that most of the leavening action comes from heat side of
    >> the equation.

    >
    >
    > If one could discount the steam produced in the baking process there
    > might be a way to verify what you are saying, However if you let a
    > batter rest for several hours and then bake it I suspect you'll see how
    > it ends up.
    >
    > I guess pancake batter made fresh and batter from the day before would
    > give some comparison. I wonder just how stable wet cream of Tartar is.
    >
    > Dimitri


    As a datapoint, I've had quickbread batter sit for well over
    an hour while the first round of cakes baked. When the long
    sitting batch cooked they were identical in every way to the
    ones that were cooked immediately. No loss of leavening.


  16. #16
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: baking soda II


    "RegForte" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:ISrfl.18896$[email protected]..
    > Dimitri wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> "RegForte" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:Bwrfl.9499$[email protected]..
    >>

    >
    >>> Yes. I'm familiar with the theoretical part.
    >>>
    >>> What I'm saying is that I've found through experimentation
    >>> that most of the leavening action comes from heat side of
    >>> the equation.

    >>
    >>
    >> If one could discount the steam produced in the baking process there
    >> might be a way to verify what you are saying, However if you let a batter
    >> rest for several hours and then bake it I suspect you'll see how it ends
    >> up.
    >>
    >> I guess pancake batter made fresh and batter from the day before would
    >> give some comparison. I wonder just how stable wet cream of Tartar is.
    >>
    >> Dimitri

    >
    > As a datapoint, I've had quickbread batter sit for well over
    > an hour while the first round of cakes baked. When the long
    > sitting batch cooked they were identical in every way to the
    > ones that were cooked immediately. No loss of leavening.


    Interesting.

    Your batter or commercial (box)

    Dimitri


  17. #17
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: baking soda II

    On Mon, 26 Jan 2009 14:44:14 -0800, Dimitri wrote:

    > "Goomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> Dimitri wrote:
    >>
    >>>> Back in my Home-Ec days we were taught about the actions of these
    >>>> ingredients which are- Baking powder recipes act on heat, Baking soda
    >>>> recipes act on acid.
    >>>
    >>> I think that was an oversimplification although I am sure it's true.
    >>>
    >>> The acid in the powder starts an immediate reaction when mixed with the
    >>> soda & liquid. It's the # 1 reason to pre-heat your oven.

    >>
    >> It was about as much as most 7th grade girls had patience to learn, I
    >> suppose?
    >> I recall the lecture expanded on it some in warning to not mix up batters
    >> with these agents and let the batter sit around or you'd lose
    >> effectiveness.
    >> Goomba

    >
    > Seventh Grade I think we were studying transubstantiation or getting the tar
    > beat out of us. I forget which
    >
    > :-)
    >
    > Dimitri


    not both at once?

    your pal,
    blake

  18. #18
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: baking soda II


    "blake murphy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:19t2xivob9she$.[email protected]..
    > On Mon, 26 Jan 2009 14:44:14 -0800, Dimitri wrote:
    >
    >> "Goomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>> Dimitri wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>> Back in my Home-Ec days we were taught about the actions of these
    >>>>> ingredients which are- Baking powder recipes act on heat, Baking soda
    >>>>> recipes act on acid.
    >>>>
    >>>> I think that was an oversimplification although I am sure it's true.
    >>>>
    >>>> The acid in the powder starts an immediate reaction when mixed with the
    >>>> soda & liquid. It's the # 1 reason to pre-heat your oven.
    >>>
    >>> It was about as much as most 7th grade girls had patience to learn, I
    >>> suppose?
    >>> I recall the lecture expanded on it some in warning to not mix up
    >>> batters
    >>> with these agents and let the batter sit around or you'd lose
    >>> effectiveness.
    >>> Goomba

    >>
    >> Seventh Grade I think we were studying transubstantiation or getting the
    >> tar
    >> beat out of us. I forget which
    >>
    >> :-)
    >>
    >> Dimitri

    >
    > not both at once?
    >
    > your pal,
    > blake


    Sure I guess you never meet Sister Mary I'm-Gonna-Get-Cha

    She enjoyed lifting young men by the hair on their sideburns.

    :-)

    Dimitri


  19. #19
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: baking soda II

    In article <qHrfl.2215$[email protected]>,
    "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote:


    > some comparison. I wonder just how stable wet cream of Tartar is.


    I don't really know, but I would guess pretty stable. It is often
    produced from the lees at the bottom of wine tanks. Those, of course,
    are pretty darned wet. If a wine has too much tartaric acid, it
    sometimes throws it off while in the bottle. It likes to crystalize on
    the bottom of the cork. Of course, that is supposed to be kept pretty
    darned wet also. The crystals on the cork are considered a cosmetic
    defect, since the flavor is not affected, but people don't like them, so
    often that wine is discounted.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  20. #20
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: baking soda II

    On Tue, 27 Jan 2009 12:40:21 -0800, Dimitri wrote:

    > "blake murphy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:19t2xivob9she$.[email protected]..
    >> On Mon, 26 Jan 2009 14:44:14 -0800, Dimitri wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Goomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:[email protected]..
    >>>> Dimitri wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>> Back in my Home-Ec days we were taught about the actions of these
    >>>>>> ingredients which are- Baking powder recipes act on heat, Baking soda
    >>>>>> recipes act on acid.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I think that was an oversimplification although I am sure it's true.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> The acid in the powder starts an immediate reaction when mixed with the
    >>>>> soda & liquid. It's the # 1 reason to pre-heat your oven.
    >>>>
    >>>> It was about as much as most 7th grade girls had patience to learn, I
    >>>> suppose?
    >>>> I recall the lecture expanded on it some in warning to not mix up
    >>>> batters
    >>>> with these agents and let the batter sit around or you'd lose
    >>>> effectiveness.
    >>>> Goomba
    >>>
    >>> Seventh Grade I think we were studying transubstantiation or getting the
    >>> tar
    >>> beat out of us. I forget which
    >>>
    >>> :-)
    >>>
    >>> Dimitri

    >>
    >> not both at once?
    >>
    >> your pal,
    >> blake

    >
    > Sure I guess you never meet Sister Mary I'm-Gonna-Get-Cha
    >
    > She enjoyed lifting young men by the hair on their sideburns.
    >
    > :-)
    >
    > Dimitri


    my father used to say the nuns would rap the kids on the knuckles with a
    ruler - not a flat ruler, but one of the triangular ones, and they'd use
    the edge, not the flat part.

    <http://pro.corbis.com/images/BIC054.jpg?size=572&uid={CA730AEA-4AC7-449B-8769-C4DC650A30BA}>

    your public-school pal,
    blake

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