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Thread: Baking question - cinnamon roll texture

  1. #1
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Baking question - cinnamon roll texture

    I'm trying to duplicate the texture of the cinnamon rolls I used to get from
    an old neighborhood bakery. They cooked these rolls up in large sheets where
    they connected together as they expanded, then they pulled them out in sets
    of six for sale, each individual roll maybe 3-4 inches square and almost as
    tall, with a simple white icing. They called them "old fashioned" cinnamons,
    and they also offered some denser rolls cooked six to a disposable aluminum
    pan, and individually cooked cinnamons, but neither one had the texture of
    the old fashioneds.

    They had this texture which was definitely not spongy or cakey at all. I'd
    describe it more as strandy, where if you pulled on pieces as if to unroll
    it the pieces came off in rather thick hunks of vertical strands. It was
    light but not too light, just perfect. In my mind this is the holy grail of
    cinnamon rolls.

    Does this make sense and how would you prepare a dough to get this texture?
    All my attempts yield something more like a sticky bun texture, way too
    dense and thick. Maybe the solution is obvious to some of you accomplished
    bakers, but I'm not in that league so please help!

    BTW, the venerable old bakery (McClain's, Waldo, Kansas City) is still in
    business under newer owners but many conditions, mostly beyond their
    control, have caused their business to drop off, so now they don't make
    nearly the variety or quantity of treats as they did "back in the day". The
    old fashioned cinnamons were one of the casualties of cutting back.

    MartyB



  2. #2
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Baking question - cinnamon roll texture

    On Mar 21, 12:29*pm, "Nunya Bidnits" <nunyabidn...@eternal-
    september.invalid> wrote:
    > I'm trying to duplicate the texture of the cinnamon rolls I used to get from
    > an old neighborhood bakery. They cooked these rolls up in large sheets where
    > they connected together as they expanded, then they pulled them out in sets
    > of six for sale, each individual roll maybe 3-4 inches square and almost as
    > tall, with a simple white icing. They called them "old fashioned" cinnamons,
    > and they also offered some denser rolls cooked six to a disposable aluminum
    > pan, and individually cooked cinnamons, but neither one had the texture of
    > the old fashioneds.
    >
    > They had this texture which was definitely not spongy or cakey at all. I'd
    > describe it more as strandy, where if you pulled on pieces as if to unroll
    > it the pieces came off in rather thick hunks of vertical strands. It was
    > light but not too light, just perfect. In my mind this is the holy grail of
    > cinnamon rolls.
    >
    > Does this make sense and how would you prepare a dough to get this texture?
    > All my attempts yield something more like a sticky bun texture, way too
    > dense and thick. Maybe the solution is obvious to some of you accomplished
    > bakers, but I'm not in that league so please help!
    >
    > BTW, the venerable old bakery (McClain's, Waldo, Kansas City) *is stillin
    > business under newer owners but many conditions, mostly beyond their
    > control, have caused their business to drop off, so now they don't make
    > nearly the variety or quantity of treats as they did "back in the day". The
    > old fashioned cinnamons were one of the casualties of cutting back.
    >
    > MartyB


    You are describing a more 'bready' yeast roll texture. I found
    the Gump bread recipe yeilds pretty much exactly what you are looking
    for. I discovered this bread in a backyard chickens group and it's
    perfect for your purposes. Scroll all the way down the page to see
    what you are looking for. This recipe is good for breads of all
    types.

    http://www.hizzoners.com/recipes/bre...5-minute-bread



  3. #3
    Stu. Guest

    Default Re: Baking question - cinnamon roll texture

    On Mon, 21 Mar 2011 14:29:35 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm trying to duplicate the texture of the cinnamon rolls I used to get from
    >an old neighborhood bakery. They cooked these rolls up in large sheets where
    >they connected together as they expanded, then they pulled them out in sets
    >of six for sale, each individual roll maybe 3-4 inches square and almost as
    >tall, with a simple white icing. They called them "old fashioned" cinnamons,
    >and they also offered some denser rolls cooked six to a disposable aluminum
    >pan, and individually cooked cinnamons, but neither one had the texture of
    >the old fashioneds.
    >
    >They had this texture which was definitely not spongy or cakey at all. I'd
    >describe it more as strandy, where if you pulled on pieces as if to unroll
    >it the pieces came off in rather thick hunks of vertical strands. It was
    >light but not too light, just perfect. In my mind this is the holy grail of
    >cinnamon rolls.
    >
    >Does this make sense and how would you prepare a dough to get this texture?
    >All my attempts yield something more like a sticky bun texture, way too
    >dense and thick. Maybe the solution is obvious to some of you accomplished
    >bakers, but I'm not in that league so please help!
    >
    >BTW, the venerable old bakery (McClain's, Waldo, Kansas City) is still in
    >business under newer owners but many conditions, mostly beyond their
    >control, have caused their business to drop off, so now they don't make
    >nearly the variety or quantity of treats as they did "back in the day". The
    >old fashioned cinnamons were one of the casualties of cutting back.
    >
    >MartyB
    >


    We had a bakery a few blocks from us that made something like you describe, the
    buns were huge and tasty. The only thing I can think of is that the texture was
    like they weren't quite cooked almost doughy ()actually more cooked than
    doughy), and you could pull them apart in large pieces. I can almost taste
    them, once you had them slathered in butter the taste was hard to forget.

    There's a place downtown that I know makes them, may have to go visit now. ;-)

  4. #4
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Baking question - cinnamon roll texture

    On Mon, 21 Mar 2011 14:29:35 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm trying to duplicate the texture of the cinnamon rolls I used to get from
    >an old neighborhood bakery. They cooked these rolls up in large sheets where
    >they connected together as they expanded, then they pulled them out in sets
    >of six for sale, each individual roll maybe 3-4 inches square and almost as
    >tall, with a simple white icing. They called them "old fashioned" cinnamons,
    >and they also offered some denser rolls cooked six to a disposable aluminum
    >pan, and individually cooked cinnamons, but neither one had the texture of
    >the old fashioneds.
    >
    >They had this texture which was definitely not spongy or cakey at all. I'd
    >describe it more as strandy, where if you pulled on pieces as if to unroll
    >it the pieces came off in rather thick hunks of vertical strands. It was
    >light but not too light, just perfect. In my mind this is the holy grail of
    >cinnamon rolls.
    >
    >Does this make sense and how would you prepare a dough to get this texture?
    >All my attempts yield something more like a sticky bun texture, way too
    >dense and thick. Maybe the solution is obvious to some of you accomplished
    >bakers, but I'm not in that league so please help!
    >
    >BTW, the venerable old bakery (McClain's, Waldo, Kansas City) is still in
    >business under newer owners but many conditions, mostly beyond their
    >control, have caused their business to drop off, so now they don't make
    >nearly the variety or quantity of treats as they did "back in the day". The
    >old fashioned cinnamons were one of the casualties of cutting back.


    Sweet dough:
    http://www.quartermaster.army.mil/jc...n_d/D03600.pdf

    Or:
    http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/fo...ky-Buns-106413

  5. #5
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Baking question - cinnamon roll texture


    "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:im88v3$mct$[email protected]..
    > I'm trying to duplicate the texture of the cinnamon rolls I used to get
    > from an old neighborhood bakery. They cooked these rolls up in large
    > sheets where they connected together as they expanded, then they pulled
    > them out in sets of six for sale, each individual roll maybe 3-4 inches
    > square and almost as tall, with a simple white icing. They called them
    > "old fashioned" cinnamons, and they also offered some denser rolls cooked
    > six to a disposable aluminum pan, and individually cooked cinnamons, but
    > neither one had the texture of the old fashioneds.
    >
    > They had this texture which was definitely not spongy or cakey at all. I'd
    > describe it more as strandy, where if you pulled on pieces as if to unroll
    > it the pieces came off in rather thick hunks of vertical strands. It was
    > light but not too light, just perfect. In my mind this is the holy grail
    > of cinnamon rolls.
    >
    > Does this make sense and how would you prepare a dough to get this
    > texture? All my attempts yield something more like a sticky bun texture,
    > way too dense and thick. Maybe the solution is obvious to some of you
    > accomplished bakers, but I'm not in that league so please help!
    >
    > BTW, the venerable old bakery (McClain's, Waldo, Kansas City) is still in
    > business under newer owners but many conditions, mostly beyond their
    > control, have caused their business to drop off, so now they don't make
    > nearly the variety or quantity of treats as they did "back in the day".
    > The old fashioned cinnamons were one of the casualties of cutting back.
    >


    I am not sure what you describe but IMO the very best dough for cinnamon
    buns is a potato refrigerator dinner roll. A typical recipe will use a cup
    of mashed potatoes, shortening, egg and sugar. I would say the result is
    "stringy" in that the bread peels apart in layers almost as if it had
    multiple laminations.

    Paul
    >
    >




  6. #6
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Baking question - cinnamon roll texture

    On Mon, 21 Mar 2011 14:29:35 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm trying to duplicate the texture of the cinnamon rolls I used to get from
    >an old neighborhood bakery. They cooked these rolls up in large sheets where
    >they connected together as they expanded, then they pulled them out in sets
    >of six for sale, each individual roll maybe 3-4 inches square and almost as
    >tall, with a simple white icing. They called them "old fashioned" cinnamons,
    >and they also offered some denser rolls cooked six to a disposable aluminum
    >pan, and individually cooked cinnamons, but neither one had the texture of
    >the old fashioneds.
    >

    snip
    >MartyB
    >


    Make a dough that is not dry or stiff. The dough should almost drool
    through your hands. Do not roll the dough out with a rolling pin or
    smash it flat. I'd pat it to the correct dimension. You can use a
    rolling pin if you are quick and light. Cut the rolled dough into
    maybe 2x2 inch pieces and place them in the pan where they will touch
    snugly when they grow. Touching rolls will grow taller and less dry.
    Come on over to alt.bread.recipes for some better ideas and
    discussion.
    Janet

  7. #7
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Baking question - cinnamon roll texture

    On Mon, 21 Mar 2011 13:44:34 -0700, "Paul M. Cook" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    > I am not sure what you describe but IMO the very best dough for cinnamon
    > buns is a potato refrigerator dinner roll. A typical recipe will use a cup
    > of mashed potatoes, shortening, egg and sugar. I would say the result is
    > "stringy" in that the bread peels apart in layers almost as if it had
    > multiple laminations.
    >
    > Paul


    You made me look, so I might as well add a recipe I found for that. I
    might use it to make cinnamon rolls.

    Potato Refrigerator Rolls
    http://thepioneerwoman.com/tasty-kit...gerator-rolls/
    Added by sleepycathollow on July 20 2009 in Breads Dinner Rolls

    Servings 24

    Prep Time 10 Minutes Cook Time 20 Minutes Difficulty Easy


    Ingredients

    1 package Dry Yeast
    1-˝ cup Warm Water
    1 cup Smashed Potatoes
    2/3 cup Shortening
    ˝ cup Sugar
    1-˝ teaspoon Salt
    1 cup Milk, Scalded OR Potato Water
    2 whole Eggs Beaten
    6 cups Flour

    Preparation Instructions

    Put yeast in warm water.

    In your mixing bowl combine smashed potatoes, shortening, sugar, and
    salt. Pour the scalding milk/or potato water over this mixture.

    Add softened yeast mixture, 2 eggs and 3 cups of the flour. Beat
    until smooth. Add about 3 more cups of flour and knead.

    Store in refrigerator several hours or until double in bulk (or for a
    few days).

    This is where you can either make them all into dinner rolls and bake
    in a 350F-375F oven for 20 minutes.


    OR……make sweet sticky rolls.

    Take 1/2 of the recipe from the refrigerator and roll dough to 9?x18?.
    Spread with at least 2 TBSP butter and sprinkle with 1/2 cup of white
    sugar and 2 tsp of cinnamon.

    Roll up and cut into 1inch slices and put in a 13x9 inch pan that has
    the following in the bottom:
    1/2 cup melted butter, 1/2 cup brown sugar, and 1/2 cup chopped pecans
    (optional…but not in my house!)

    Let rise till double in size then bake in a 375F oven for 25 minutes.

    Immediately invert onto a large tray.


    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  8. #8
    Goro Guest

    Default Re: Baking question - cinnamon roll texture

    On Mon, 21 Mar 2011 14:29:35 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm trying to duplicate the texture of the cinnamon rolls I used to get from
    >an old neighborhood bakery. They cooked these rolls up in large sheets where
    >they connected together as they expanded, then they pulled them out in sets
    >of six for sale, each individual roll maybe 3-4 inches square and almost as
    >tall, with a simple white icing. They called them "old fashioned" cinnamons,
    >and they also offered some denser rolls cooked six to a disposable aluminum
    >pan, and individually cooked cinnamons, but neither one had the texture of
    >the old fashioneds.
    >
    >They had this texture which was definitely not spongy or cakey at all. I'd
    >describe it more as strandy, where if you pulled on pieces as if to unroll
    >it the pieces came off in rather thick hunks of vertical strands. It was
    >light but not too light, just perfect. In my mind this is the holy grail of
    >cinnamon rolls.
    >
    >Does this make sense and how would you prepare a dough to get this texture?
    >All my attempts yield something more like a sticky bun texture, way too
    >dense and thick. Maybe the solution is obvious to some of you accomplished
    >bakers, but I'm not in that league so please help!
    >
    >BTW, the venerable old bakery (McClain's, Waldo, Kansas City) is still in
    >business under newer owners but many conditions, mostly beyond their
    >control, have caused their business to drop off, so now they don't make
    >nearly the variety or quantity of treats as they did "back in the day". The
    >old fashioned cinnamons were one of the casualties of cutting back.
    >
    >MartyB
    >


    Baking with Julia has a recipe for a Pecan Sticky buns that starts
    with brioche dough as a base and then uses softened butter on top of
    that, then folded like Puff Pastry. It's pretty amazing.

    -goro-

  9. #9
    Stu. Guest

    Default Re: Baking question - cinnamon roll texture

    On Mon, 21 Mar 2011 14:52:06 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Mon, 21 Mar 2011 13:44:34 -0700, "Paul M. Cook" <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> I am not sure what you describe but IMO the very best dough for cinnamon
    >> buns is a potato refrigerator dinner roll. A typical recipe will use a cup
    >> of mashed potatoes, shortening, egg and sugar. I would say the result is
    >> "stringy" in that the bread peels apart in layers almost as if it had
    >> multiple laminations.
    >>
    >> Paul

    >
    >You made me look, so I might as well add a recipe I found for that. I
    >might use it to make cinnamon rolls.
    >
    >Potato Refrigerator Rolls
    >http://thepioneerwoman.com/tasty-kit...gerator-rolls/


    I follow the pioneer woman on twitter, she's a great number of yummy recipes

  10. #10
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Baking question - cinnamon roll texture


    "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:im88v3$mct$[email protected]..
    > I'm trying to duplicate the texture of the cinnamon rolls I used to get
    > from an old neighborhood bakery. They cooked these rolls up in large
    > sheets where they connected together as they expanded, then they pulled
    > them out in sets of six for sale, each individual roll maybe 3-4 inches
    > square and almost as tall, with a simple white icing. They called them
    > "old fashioned" cinnamons, and they also offered some denser rolls cooked
    > six to a disposable aluminum pan, and individually cooked cinnamons, but
    > neither one had the texture of the old fashioneds.
    >
    > They had this texture which was definitely not spongy or cakey at all. I'd
    > describe it more as strandy, where if you pulled on pieces as if to unroll
    > it the pieces came off in rather thick hunks of vertical strands. It was
    > light but not too light, just perfect. In my mind this is the holy grail
    > of cinnamon rolls.
    >
    > Does this make sense and how would you prepare a dough to get this
    > texture? All my attempts yield something more like a sticky bun texture,
    > way too dense and thick. Maybe the solution is obvious to some of you
    > accomplished bakers, but I'm not in that league so please help!
    >
    > BTW, the venerable old bakery (McClain's, Waldo, Kansas City) is still in
    > business under newer owners but many conditions, mostly beyond their
    > control, have caused their business to drop off, so now they don't make
    > nearly the variety or quantity of treats as they did "back in the day".
    > The old fashioned cinnamons were one of the casualties of cutting back.
    >
    > MartyB
    >


    This is what you want
    Buns, Philadelphia Cinnamon (D, TNT)
    Source: Edwin Pawlowski at rec.food.cooking
    Yield: 14 rolls
    2 9" round cake pans
    3-1/2 cups flour
    1 tablespoon active yeast
    1/4 cup tepid water
    1/2 cup sugar
    1/2 tsp. salt
    1 cup tepid milk
    2 egg yolks
    6 tablespoons butter, melted
    1-1/2 cups light brown sugar
    1/2 cup light corn syrup
    1/2 cup seedless raisins (I used about 1 cup)
    1 tsp. cinnamon

    Proof the yeast by putting into a bowl with 1 teaspoon of sugar and 1/4 cup
    warm (tepid) water and placing the bowl in a warm place. (I turn on the oven
    and put it on top of the stove) until the mixture bubbles.

    Combine 3 cups of flour, sugar, and salt into a bowl. Stir the dry mix well.
    Add the yeast mixture, egg yolks, and tepid milk.

    With a large spoon, slowly mix the ingredients and continue to stir until
    the dough is smooth and can be gathered in a ball. Place the ball on a
    lightly floured surface and knead it until it becomes smooth, shiny, and
    elastic. As you knead, add up to the 1/2 cup of flour on the ball to make it
    firm.

    Place the dough in a greased bowl, turning once. Drape the bowl with a
    kitchen towel and put it in a warm place for about an hour or until double
    in volume.

    In a small bowl, mix 3/4 cup of the brown sugar, 2 tablespoons of the melted
    butter and the corn syrup to make a thick shiny paste. Pour half of the
    paste into each 9" cake pan, spreading it to the edge. Set this bowl aside.

    In another bowl mix the balance of the brown sugar, raisins and cinnamon
    until well blended. Set this bowl aside.

    When the dough has doubled in size, punch it down, and on a lightly floured
    surface, roll it out into an approximate rectangle 18"x10" wide, and about
    1/4" thick. Brush this dough with 2 tablespoons of the melted butter and
    sprinkle the entire surface with the brown sugar-raisin mix.

    Starting at one long side, roll the dough tightly into a cylinder about
    18x2-1/2" in diameter. With a sharp knife, slice the cylinder crosswise into
    14 rounds about 1-1/4" thick. Place one slice, cut side up, in the center of
    the cake pan. (I used the end cuts for the middle piece, because it was a
    little smaller and fit better).

    Arrange 6 slices in each pan around the middle bun. Set the buns in a draft
    free place to rise for about 45 minutes or until double in volume.

    Preheat the oven to 350°F. Brush the tops of the buns with the remaining 2
    tablespoons melted butter and bake in the center of the oven for about 25
    minutes or until golden brown.

    Place a plate over each cake pan, and invert. Let the cinnamon rolls cool to
    lukewarm before serving.






  11. #11
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Baking question - cinnamon roll texture


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Mon, 21 Mar 2011 13:44:34 -0700, "Paul M. Cook" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> I am not sure what you describe but IMO the very best dough for cinnamon
    >> buns is a potato refrigerator dinner roll. A typical recipe will use a
    >> cup
    >> of mashed potatoes, shortening, egg and sugar. I would say the result is
    >> "stringy" in that the bread peels apart in layers almost as if it had
    >> multiple laminations.
    >>
    >> Paul

    >
    > You made me look, so I might as well add a recipe I found for that. I
    > might use it to make cinnamon rolls.
    >
    > Potato Refrigerator Rolls
    > http://thepioneerwoman.com/tasty-kit...gerator-rolls/
    > Added by sleepycathollow on July 20 2009 in Breads Dinner Rolls
    >
    > Servings 24
    >
    > Prep Time 10 Minutes Cook Time 20 Minutes Difficulty Easy
    >
    >
    > Ingredients
    >
    > 1 package Dry Yeast
    > 1-˝ cup Warm Water
    > 1 cup Smashed Potatoes
    > 2/3 cup Shortening
    > ˝ cup Sugar
    > 1-˝ teaspoon Salt
    > 1 cup Milk, Scalded OR Potato Water
    > 2 whole Eggs Beaten
    > 6 cups Flour


    That's a pretty typical recipe. Flour amounts vary considerably though. I
    also use both milk and potato water. A very slow rise is they key, at least
    12 hours in the coldest part of your fridge. Better yet is 24 hours. The
    finished bread is extremely fragrant, tender and slightly sweet with a
    velvety texture. It makes perfect cinnamon rolls.

    Paul



  12. #12
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Baking question - cinnamon roll texture

    Re: 2aacd531-ed39-4734-aba5-e885d8d56658...oglegroups.com

    ImStillMags <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Mar 21, 12:29 pm, "Nunya Bidnits" <nunyabidn...@eternal-
    > september.invalid> wrote:
    >> I'm trying to duplicate the texture of the cinnamon rolls I used to
    >> get from an old neighborhood bakery. They cooked these rolls up in
    >> large sheets where they connected together as they expanded, then
    >> they pulled them out in sets of six for sale, each individual roll
    >> maybe 3-4 inches square and almost as tall, with a simple white
    >> icing. They called them "old fashioned" cinnamons, and they also
    >> offered some denser rolls cooked six to a disposable aluminum pan,
    >> and individually cooked cinnamons, but neither one had the texture
    >> of the old fashioneds.
    >>
    >> They had this texture which was definitely not spongy or cakey at
    >> all. I'd describe it more as strandy, where if you pulled on pieces
    >> as if to unroll it the pieces came off in rather thick hunks of
    >> vertical strands. It was light but not too light, just perfect. In
    >> my mind this is the holy grail of cinnamon rolls.
    >>
    >> Does this make sense and how would you prepare a dough to get this
    >> texture? All my attempts yield something more like a sticky bun
    >> texture, way too dense and thick. Maybe the solution is obvious to
    >> some of you accomplished bakers, but I'm not in that league so
    >> please help!
    >>
    >> BTW, the venerable old bakery (McClain's, Waldo, Kansas City) is
    >> still in business under newer owners but many conditions, mostly
    >> beyond their control, have caused their business to drop off, so now
    >> they don't make nearly the variety or quantity of treats as they did
    >> "back in the day". The old fashioned cinnamons were one of the
    >> casualties of cutting back.
    >>
    >> MartyB

    >
    > You are describing a more 'bready' yeast roll texture. I found
    > the Gump bread recipe yeilds pretty much exactly what you are looking
    > for. I discovered this bread in a backyard chickens group and it's
    > perfect for your purposes. Scroll all the way down the page to see
    > what you are looking for. This recipe is good for breads of all
    > types.
    >
    > http://www.hizzoners.com/recipes/bre...5-minute-bread


    That looks really good! I'm going to try out your recipe and Ed's this week,
    with some good Ceylon cinnamon.

    I trust your recipe. Anybody who would put bacon in a cinnamon roll can't be
    all bad. ;-)



  13. #13
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Baking question - cinnamon roll texture

    Re: [email protected]

    Ed Pawlowski <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > message news:im88v3$mct$[email protected]..
    >> I'm trying to duplicate the texture of the cinnamon rolls I used to
    >> get from an old neighborhood bakery. They cooked these rolls up in
    >> large sheets where they connected together as they expanded, then
    >> they pulled them out in sets of six for sale, each individual roll
    >> maybe 3-4 inches square and almost as tall, with a simple white
    >> icing. They called them "old fashioned" cinnamons, and they also
    >> offered some denser rolls cooked six to a disposable aluminum pan,
    >> and individually cooked cinnamons, but neither one had the texture
    >> of the old fashioneds. They had this texture which was definitely not
    >> spongy or cakey at
    >> all. I'd describe it more as strandy, where if you pulled on pieces
    >> as if to unroll it the pieces came off in rather thick hunks of
    >> vertical strands. It was light but not too light, just perfect. In
    >> my mind this is the holy grail of cinnamon rolls.
    >>
    >> Does this make sense and how would you prepare a dough to get this
    >> texture? All my attempts yield something more like a sticky bun
    >> texture, way too dense and thick. Maybe the solution is obvious to
    >> some of you accomplished bakers, but I'm not in that league so
    >> please help! BTW, the venerable old bakery (McClain's, Waldo, Kansas
    >> City) is
    >> still in business under newer owners but many conditions, mostly
    >> beyond their control, have caused their business to drop off, so now
    >> they don't make nearly the variety or quantity of treats as they did
    >> "back in the day". The old fashioned cinnamons were one of the
    >> casualties of cutting back. MartyB
    >>

    >
    > This is what you want
    > Buns, Philadelphia Cinnamon (D, TNT)
    > Source: Edwin Pawlowski at rec.food.cooking
    > Yield: 14 rolls
    > 2 9" round cake pans
    > 3-1/2 cups flour
    > 1 tablespoon active yeast
    > 1/4 cup tepid water
    > 1/2 cup sugar
    > 1/2 tsp. salt
    > 1 cup tepid milk
    > 2 egg yolks
    > 6 tablespoons butter, melted
    > 1-1/2 cups light brown sugar
    > 1/2 cup light corn syrup
    > 1/2 cup seedless raisins (I used about 1 cup)
    > 1 tsp. cinnamon
    >
    > Proof the yeast by putting into a bowl with 1 teaspoon of sugar and
    > 1/4 cup warm (tepid) water and placing the bowl in a warm place. (I
    > turn on the oven and put it on top of the stove) until the mixture
    > bubbles.
    > Combine 3 cups of flour, sugar, and salt into a bowl. Stir the dry
    > mix well. Add the yeast mixture, egg yolks, and tepid milk.
    >
    > With a large spoon, slowly mix the ingredients and continue to stir
    > until the dough is smooth and can be gathered in a ball. Place the
    > ball on a lightly floured surface and knead it until it becomes
    > smooth, shiny, and elastic. As you knead, add up to the 1/2 cup of
    > flour on the ball to make it firm.
    >
    > Place the dough in a greased bowl, turning once. Drape the bowl with a
    > kitchen towel and put it in a warm place for about an hour or until
    > double in volume.
    >
    > In a small bowl, mix 3/4 cup of the brown sugar, 2 tablespoons of the
    > melted butter and the corn syrup to make a thick shiny paste. Pour
    > half of the paste into each 9" cake pan, spreading it to the edge.
    > Set this bowl aside.
    > In another bowl mix the balance of the brown sugar, raisins and
    > cinnamon until well blended. Set this bowl aside.
    >
    > When the dough has doubled in size, punch it down, and on a lightly
    > floured surface, roll it out into an approximate rectangle 18"x10"
    > wide, and about 1/4" thick. Brush this dough with 2 tablespoons of
    > the melted butter and sprinkle the entire surface with the brown
    > sugar-raisin mix.
    > Starting at one long side, roll the dough tightly into a cylinder
    > about 18x2-1/2" in diameter. With a sharp knife, slice the cylinder
    > crosswise into 14 rounds about 1-1/4" thick. Place one slice, cut
    > side up, in the center of the cake pan. (I used the end cuts for the
    > middle piece, because it was a little smaller and fit better).
    >
    > Arrange 6 slices in each pan around the middle bun. Set the buns in a
    > draft free place to rise for about 45 minutes or until double in
    > volume.
    > Preheat the oven to 350°F. Brush the tops of the buns with the
    > remaining 2 tablespoons melted butter and bake in the center of the
    > oven for about 25 minutes or until golden brown.
    >
    > Place a plate over each cake pan, and invert. Let the cinnamon rolls
    > cool to lukewarm before serving.


    That's a likely looking recipe. I'll be trying it this week, thanks! Mags
    recipe too. Looks like I'll be swimming in cinnamon for a few days!

    Picked up some Ceylon cinnamon at my local spice shop which smells
    fantastic. This should be a good week.



  14. #14
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Baking question - cinnamon roll texture

    Re: [email protected]

    Stu. <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Mon, 21 Mar 2011 14:29:35 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I'm trying to duplicate the texture of the cinnamon rolls I used to
    >> get from an old neighborhood bakery. They cooked these rolls up in
    >> large sheets where they connected together as they expanded, then
    >> they pulled them out in sets of six for sale, each individual roll
    >> maybe 3-4 inches square and almost as tall, with a simple white
    >> icing. They called them "old fashioned" cinnamons, and they also
    >> offered some denser rolls cooked six to a disposable aluminum pan,
    >> and individually cooked cinnamons, but neither one had the texture
    >> of the old fashioneds.


    >>
    >> They had this texture which was definitely not spongy or cakey at
    >> all. I'd describe it more as strandy, where if you pulled on pieces
    >> as if to unroll it the pieces came off in rather thick hunks of
    >> vertical strands. It was light but not too light, just perfect. In
    >> my mind this is the holy grail of cinnamon rolls.
    >>
    >> Does this make sense and how would you prepare a dough to get this
    >> texture? All my attempts yield something more like a sticky bun
    >> texture, way too dense and thick. Maybe the solution is obvious to
    >> some of you accomplished bakers, but I'm not in that league so
    >> please help!
    >>
    >> BTW, the venerable old bakery (McClain's, Waldo, Kansas City) is
    >> still in business under newer owners but many conditions, mostly
    >> beyond their control, have caused their business to drop off, so now
    >> they don't make nearly the variety or quantity of treats as they did
    >> "back in the day". The old fashioned cinnamons were one of the
    >> casualties of cutting back.
    >>
    >> MartyB
    >>

    >
    > We had a bakery a few blocks from us that made something like you
    > describe, the buns were huge and tasty. The only thing I can think of
    > is that the texture was like they weren't quite cooked almost doughy
    > ()actually more cooked than doughy), and you could pull them apart in
    > large pieces. I can almost taste them, once you had them slathered in
    > butter the taste was hard to forget.


    That very well describes what I am trying to recreate. There is a definite
    directional "strandy" grain but as you state, it's still almost doughy, but
    not really. It's just really moist.



  15. #15
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Baking question - cinnamon roll texture

    On Mar 21, 2:29*pm, "Nunya Bidnits" <nunyabidn...@eternal-
    september.invalid> wrote:
    > I'm trying to duplicate the texture of the cinnamon rolls I used to get from
    > an old neighborhood bakery. They cooked these rolls up in large sheets where
    > they connected together as they expanded, then they pulled them out in sets
    > of six for sale, each individual roll maybe 3-4 inches square and almost as
    > tall, with a simple white icing. They called them "old fashioned" cinnamons,
    > and they also offered some denser rolls cooked six to a disposable aluminum
    > pan, and individually cooked cinnamons, but neither one had the texture of
    > the old fashioneds.
    >
    > They had this texture which was definitely not spongy or cakey at all. I'd
    > describe it more as strandy, where if you pulled on pieces as if to unroll
    > it the pieces came off in rather thick hunks of vertical strands. It was
    > light but not too light, just perfect. In my mind this is the holy grail of
    > cinnamon rolls.



    > MartyB


    Find a recipe from a reliable source and perfect your technique.
    Easy. I use BH & G's old "Bread" (1962) recipe book - perfect every
    time. It's a "rich roll dough" recipe - also can be used for plain,
    rich dinner rolls or for caramel pecan rolls.
    Make sure your yeast is fresh. I always use powdered, not cake type.
    I've been using Hodgson's Mills or whatever the name is.

    N.

  16. #16
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Baking question - cinnamon roll texture

    On Mar 21, 3:44*pm, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:
    > "Nunya Bidnits" <nunyabidn...@eternal-september.invalid> wrote in message
    >
    > news:im88v3$mct$[email protected]..
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > I'm trying to duplicate the texture of the cinnamon rolls I used to get
    > > from an old neighborhood bakery. They cooked these rolls up in large
    > > sheets where they connected together as they expanded, then they pulled
    > > them out in sets of six for sale, each individual roll maybe 3-4 inches
    > > square and almost as tall, with a simple white icing. They called them
    > > "old fashioned" cinnamons, and they also offered some denser rolls cooked
    > > six to a disposable aluminum pan, and individually cooked cinnamons, but
    > > neither one had the texture of the old fashioneds.

    >
    > > They had this texture which was definitely not spongy or cakey at all. I'd
    > > describe it more as strandy, where if you pulled on pieces as if to unroll
    > > it the pieces came off in rather thick hunks of vertical strands. It was
    > > light but not too light, just perfect. In my mind this is the holy grail
    > > of cinnamon rolls.

    >
    > > Does this make sense and how would you prepare a dough to get this
    > > texture? All my attempts yield something more like a sticky bun texture,
    > > way too dense and thick. Maybe the solution is obvious to some of you
    > > accomplished bakers, but I'm not in that league so please help!

    >
    > > BTW, the venerable old bakery (McClain's, Waldo, Kansas City) *is still in
    > > business under newer owners but many conditions, mostly beyond their
    > > control, have caused their business to drop off, so now they don't make
    > > nearly the variety or quantity of treats as they did "back in the day".
    > > The old fashioned cinnamons were one of the casualties of cutting back.

    >
    > I am not sure what you describe but IMO the very best dough for cinnamon
    > buns is a potato refrigerator dinner roll. *A typical recipe will use acup
    > of mashed potatoes, shortening, egg and sugar. *I would say the result is
    > "stringy" in that the bread peels apart in layers almost as if it had
    > multiple laminations.
    >
    > Paul
    >
    >
    >
    > - Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    I use leftover mashed potatoes for Czech "Kolaches," but find it too
    heavy for the cinnamon roll texture the OP wants.

    N.

  17. #17
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Baking question - cinnamon roll texture


    "Nancy2" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    On Mar 21, 3:44 pm, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:
    > "Nunya Bidnits" <nunyabidn...@eternal-september.invalid> wrote in message
    >
    > news:im88v3$mct$[email protected]..
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > I'm trying to duplicate the texture of the cinnamon rolls I used to get
    > > from an old neighborhood bakery. They cooked these rolls up in large
    > > sheets where they connected together as they expanded, then they pulled
    > > them out in sets of six for sale, each individual roll maybe 3-4 inches
    > > square and almost as tall, with a simple white icing. They called them
    > > "old fashioned" cinnamons, and they also offered some denser rolls
    > > cooked
    > > six to a disposable aluminum pan, and individually cooked cinnamons, but
    > > neither one had the texture of the old fashioneds.

    >
    > > They had this texture which was definitely not spongy or cakey at all.
    > > I'd
    > > describe it more as strandy, where if you pulled on pieces as if to
    > > unroll
    > > it the pieces came off in rather thick hunks of vertical strands. It was
    > > light but not too light, just perfect. In my mind this is the holy grail
    > > of cinnamon rolls.

    >
    > > Does this make sense and how would you prepare a dough to get this
    > > texture? All my attempts yield something more like a sticky bun texture,
    > > way too dense and thick. Maybe the solution is obvious to some of you
    > > accomplished bakers, but I'm not in that league so please help!

    >
    > > BTW, the venerable old bakery (McClain's, Waldo, Kansas City) is still
    > > in
    > > business under newer owners but many conditions, mostly beyond their
    > > control, have caused their business to drop off, so now they don't make
    > > nearly the variety or quantity of treats as they did "back in the day".
    > > The old fashioned cinnamons were one of the casualties of cutting back.

    >
    > I am not sure what you describe but IMO the very best dough for cinnamon
    > buns is a potato refrigerator dinner roll. A typical recipe will use a cup
    > of mashed potatoes, shortening, egg and sugar. I would say the result is
    > "stringy" in that the bread peels apart in layers almost as if it had
    > multiple laminations.
    >
    > Paul
    >
    >
    >
    > - Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    I use leftover mashed potatoes for Czech "Kolaches," but find it too
    heavy for the cinnamon roll texture the OP wants.


    They should try it. The result is much lighter and delicate than you think.

    Paul
    N.



  18. #18
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Baking question - cinnamon roll texture

    Re: [email protected]

    Ed Pawlowski <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Buns, Philadelphia Cinnamon (D, TNT)


    Just curious, what does the (D, TNT) mean?



  19. #19
    .Stu Guest

    Default Re: Baking question - cinnamon roll texture

    On Tue, 22 Mar 2011 12:34:55 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Re: [email protected]
    >
    >Ed Pawlowski <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Buns, Philadelphia Cinnamon (D, TNT)

    >
    >Just curious, what does the (D, TNT) mean?
    >


    Not sure about the D, but it's possible the recipe is from the tnt cookbook by
    bmcnichol in Dover, PA
    Perhaps the D is Dover?

  20. #20
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Baking question - cinnamon roll texture

    On Mar 22, 12:25*pm, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:
    > "Nancy2" <nancy-doo...@uiowa.edu> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]..
    > On Mar 21, 3:44 pm, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > "Nunya Bidnits" <nunyabidn...@eternal-september.invalid> wrote in message

    >
    > >news:im88v3$mct$[email protected]..

    >
    > > > I'm trying to duplicate the texture of the cinnamon rolls I used to get
    > > > from an old neighborhood bakery. They cooked these rolls up in large
    > > > sheets where they connected together as they expanded, then they pulled
    > > > them out in sets of six for sale, each individual roll maybe 3-4 inches
    > > > square and almost as tall, with a simple white icing. They called them
    > > > "old fashioned" cinnamons, and they also offered some denser rolls
    > > > cooked
    > > > six to a disposable aluminum pan, and individually cooked cinnamons, but
    > > > neither one had the texture of the old fashioneds.

    >
    > > > They had this texture which was definitely not spongy or cakey at all..
    > > > I'd
    > > > describe it more as strandy, where if you pulled on pieces as if to
    > > > unroll
    > > > it the pieces came off in rather thick hunks of vertical strands. It was
    > > > light but not too light, just perfect. In my mind this is the holy grail
    > > > of cinnamon rolls.

    >
    > > > Does this make sense and how would you prepare a dough to get this
    > > > texture? All my attempts yield something more like a sticky bun texture,
    > > > way too dense and thick. Maybe the solution is obvious to some of you
    > > > accomplished bakers, but I'm not in that league so please help!

    >
    > > > BTW, the venerable old bakery (McClain's, Waldo, Kansas City) is still
    > > > in
    > > > business under newer owners but many conditions, mostly beyond their
    > > > control, have caused their business to drop off, so now they don't make
    > > > nearly the variety or quantity of treats as they did "back in the day".
    > > > The old fashioned cinnamons were one of the casualties of cutting back.

    >
    > > I am not sure what you describe but IMO the very best dough for cinnamon
    > > buns is a potato refrigerator dinner roll. A typical recipe will use a cup
    > > of mashed potatoes, shortening, egg and sugar. I would say the result is
    > > "stringy" in that the bread peels apart in layers almost as if it had
    > > multiple laminations.

    >
    > > Paul

    >
    > > - Hide quoted text -

    >
    > > - Show quoted text -- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > > - Show quoted text -

    >
    > I use leftover mashed potatoes for Czech "Kolaches," but find it too
    > heavy for the cinnamon roll texture the OP wants.
    >
    > They should try it. *The result is much lighter and delicate than you think.
    >
    > Paul
    > N.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    I have tried it, and find mine to be much lighter, and have the kind
    of texture the OP wants. However, because of his ingredients and
    technique, he may have a different experience. I don't have to try
    it, but he does, you're right.

    N.

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