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Thread: baking powder questions

  1. #1
    Jean B. Guest

    Default baking powder questions

    I have been baking muffins recently. I opened a can of baking
    powder, which was not past its expiration date or even close to
    it. I realized last night that it must, nonetheless, be old,
    because the muffins just are not rising much. Sooo, I am wondering:

    1) Does BP age in an unopened can? I note that the cans are not
    all metal now, so I imagine the cardboard would not offer the same
    level of protection.

    2. Do all double-acting BPs have the same leavening power? The
    one I have open is Rumford, but I have always used Calumet in the
    past. For some odd reason, Calumet is almost impossible to find
    here now.

    Thanks,


    --
    Jean B.

  2. #2
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: baking powder questions




    >I have been baking muffins recently. I opened a can of baking powder,
    >which was not past its expiration date or even close to it. I realized
    >last night that it must, nonetheless, be old, because the muffins just are
    >not rising much. Sooo, I am wondering:
    >
    > 1) Does BP age in an unopened can? I note that the cans are not all metal
    > now, so I imagine the cardboard would not offer the same level of
    > protection.
    >
    > 2. Do all double-acting BPs have the same leavening power? The one I have
    > open is Rumford, but I have always used Calumet in the past. For some odd
    > reason, Calumet is almost impossible to find here now.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Jean B.
    >
    >

    The chemical makeup of baking powder is: baking soda plus cream of tartar
    plus cornstarch.... or:

    I thought there was a clear answer to this; apparently there is not. I'd
    contact the mfg. They're generally more helpful than you would imagine about
    a question like this. I recently had a long very insightful conversation
    from the mfg. of Ziploc bags regarding their heat sensitivity.

    Banking soda=
    NaHCO3. baking soda
    Cream of tartar KHC4H4O6.
    NaHCO3 + KHC4H4O6 ----> KNaC4H4O6 + H2O + CO2
    Some baking powders contain sodium aluminum sulfate: NaAl(SO4)2. The
    reaction there is:
    NaAl(SO4)2 + 3 NaHCO3 ----> Al(OH)3 + 2 Na2SO4 + 3 CO2
    Read more: What is the chemical composition of baking powder | Answerbag
    http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/411545#ixzz1IZWR6tON
    Baking powder is baking soda plus cream of tartar plus cornstarch....


    Good Luck, let us know,

    Kent





  3. #3
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: baking powder questions

    On 4/4/2011 12:24 PM, Kent wrote:
    >> I have been baking muffins recently. I opened a can of baking powder,
    >> which was not past its expiration date or even close to it. I realized
    >> last night that it must, nonetheless, be old, because the muffins just are
    >> not rising much. Sooo, I am wondering:
    >>
    >> 1) Does BP age in an unopened can? I note that the cans are not all metal
    >> now, so I imagine the cardboard would not offer the same level of
    >> protection.
    >>
    >> 2. Do all double-acting BPs have the same leavening power? The one I have
    >> open is Rumford, but I have always used Calumet in the past. For some odd
    >> reason, Calumet is almost impossible to find here now.
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >>
    >> Jean B.
    >>
    >>

    > The chemical makeup of baking powder is: baking soda plus cream of tartar
    > plus cornstarch.... or:
    >
    > I thought there was a clear answer to this; apparently there is not. I'd
    > contact the mfg. They're generally more helpful than you would imagine about
    > a question like this. I recently had a long very insightful conversation
    > from the mfg. of Ziploc bags regarding their heat sensitivity.
    >
    > Banking soda=
    > NaHCO3. baking soda
    > Cream of tartar KHC4H4O6.
    > NaHCO3 + KHC4H4O6 ----> KNaC4H4O6 + H2O + CO2
    > Some baking powders contain sodium aluminum sulfate: NaAl(SO4)2. The
    > reaction there is:
    > NaAl(SO4)2 + 3 NaHCO3 ----> Al(OH)3 + 2 Na2SO4 + 3 CO2
    > Read more: What is the chemical composition of baking powder | Answerbag
    > http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/411545#ixzz1IZWR6tON
    > Baking powder is baking soda plus cream of tartar plus cornstarch....
    >
    >
    > Good Luck, let us know,


    The Wikipedia article seems pretty reliable especially on the nature of
    "double-acting" baking powder, something I was never very clear about.
    The article also gives more history than you might ever want to know :-)
    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    I'm "not"
    [email protected]

  4. #4
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: baking powder questions

    Kent wrote:
    >> I have been baking muffins recently. I opened a can of baking powder,
    >> which was not past its expiration date or even close to it. I realized
    >> last night that it must, nonetheless, be old, because the muffins just are
    >> not rising much. Sooo, I am wondering:
    >>
    >> 1) Does BP age in an unopened can? I note that the cans are not all metal
    >> now, so I imagine the cardboard would not offer the same level of
    >> protection.
    >>
    >> 2. Do all double-acting BPs have the same leavening power? The one I have
    >> open is Rumford, but I have always used Calumet in the past. For some odd
    >> reason, Calumet is almost impossible to find here now.
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >>
    >> Jean B.
    >>
    >>

    > The chemical makeup of baking powder is: baking soda plus cream of tartar
    > plus cornstarch.... or:
    >
    > I thought there was a clear answer to this; apparently there is not. I'd
    > contact the mfg. They're generally more helpful than you would imagine about
    > a question like this. I recently had a long very insightful conversation
    > from the mfg. of Ziploc bags regarding their heat sensitivity.
    >
    > Banking soda=
    > NaHCO3. baking soda
    > Cream of tartar KHC4H4O6.
    > NaHCO3 + KHC4H4O6 ----> KNaC4H4O6 + H2O + CO2
    > Some baking powders contain sodium aluminum sulfate: NaAl(SO4)2. The
    > reaction there is:
    > NaAl(SO4)2 + 3 NaHCO3 ----> Al(OH)3 + 2 Na2SO4 + 3 CO2
    > Read more: What is the chemical composition of baking powder | Answerbag
    > http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/411545#ixzz1IZWR6tON
    > Baking powder is baking soda plus cream of tartar plus cornstarch....
    >
    >
    > Good Luck, let us know,
    >
    > Kent
    >
    >

    Hmmm. Yes. I need to see what the various ones are made of. I
    never gave this too much thought, because I haven't had an issue
    before. I'd use it. It would work. It would eventually become
    old, and I'd throw it out. That was it. I am not used to opening
    a can and having it not be effective.

    --
    Jean B.

  5. #5
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: baking powder questions

    James Silverton wrote:
    > On 4/4/2011 12:24 PM, Kent wrote:
    >>> I have been baking muffins recently. I opened a can of baking powder,
    >>> which was not past its expiration date or even close to it. I realized
    >>> last night that it must, nonetheless, be old, because the muffins
    >>> just are
    >>> not rising much. Sooo, I am wondering:
    >>>
    >>> 1) Does BP age in an unopened can? I note that the cans are not all
    >>> metal
    >>> now, so I imagine the cardboard would not offer the same level of
    >>> protection.
    >>>
    >>> 2. Do all double-acting BPs have the same leavening power? The one I
    >>> have
    >>> open is Rumford, but I have always used Calumet in the past. For
    >>> some odd
    >>> reason, Calumet is almost impossible to find here now.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks,
    >>>
    >>> Jean B.
    >>>
    >>>

    >> The chemical makeup of baking powder is: baking soda plus cream of tartar
    >> plus cornstarch.... or:
    >>
    >> I thought there was a clear answer to this; apparently there is not. I'd
    >> contact the mfg. They're generally more helpful than you would imagine
    >> about
    >> a question like this. I recently had a long very insightful conversation
    >> from the mfg. of Ziploc bags regarding their heat sensitivity.
    >>
    >> Banking soda=
    >> NaHCO3. baking soda
    >> Cream of tartar KHC4H4O6.
    >> NaHCO3 + KHC4H4O6 ----> KNaC4H4O6 + H2O + CO2
    >> Some baking powders contain sodium aluminum sulfate: NaAl(SO4)2. The
    >> reaction there is:
    >> NaAl(SO4)2 + 3 NaHCO3 ----> Al(OH)3 + 2 Na2SO4 + 3 CO2
    >> Read more: What is the chemical composition of baking powder | Answerbag
    >> http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/411545#ixzz1IZWR6tON
    >> Baking powder is baking soda plus cream of tartar plus cornstarch....
    >>
    >>
    >> Good Luck, let us know,

    >
    > The Wikipedia article seems pretty reliable especially on the nature of
    > "double-acting" baking powder, something I was never very clear about.
    > The article also gives more history than you might ever want to know :-)


    Thanks to you too. I actually have some old booklets on the
    topic, as well as polemics and claims about the superiority of
    various baking powders.

    --
    Jean B.

  6. #6
    Kate Connally Guest

    Default Re: baking powder questions

    On 4/3/2011 2:10 PM, Jean B. wrote:
    > I have been baking muffins recently. I opened a can of baking powder,
    > which was not past its expiration date or even close to it. I realized
    > last night that it must, nonetheless, be old, because the muffins just
    > are not rising much. Sooo, I am wondering:
    >
    > 1) Does BP age in an unopened can? I note that the cans are not all
    > metal now, so I imagine the cardboard would not offer the same level of
    > protection.
    >
    > 2. Do all double-acting BPs have the same leavening power? The one I
    > have open is Rumford, but I have always used Calumet in the past. For
    > some odd reason, Calumet is almost impossible to find here now.
    >
    > Thanks,


    In my family we have always used Rumford. It always seems to work
    fine for me. And mine is always really old because I don't use
    it all that often and I'm not about to go buy a new can each time
    I bake something. ;-)

    Kate

    --
    Kate Connally
    “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead already.”
    Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    Until you bite their heads off.”
    What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    mailto:[email protected]

  7. #7
    sf Guest

    Default Re: baking powder questions

    On Wed, 06 Apr 2011 13:45:48 -0400, Kate Connally
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 4/3/2011 2:10 PM, Jean B. wrote:
    > >
    > > 2. Do all double-acting BPs have the same leavening power? The one I
    > > have open is Rumford, but I have always used Calumet in the past. For
    > > some odd reason, Calumet is almost impossible to find here now.
    > >
    > > Thanks,

    >
    > In my family we have always used Rumford. It always seems to work
    > fine for me. And mine is always really old because I don't use
    > it all that often and I'm not about to go buy a new can each time
    > I bake something. ;-)
    >

    I have Clabber Girl in the cupboard at the moment and according to the
    internet, it's single acting. To be honest, I don't find much/any
    difference between brands and have no idea what the difference is
    between single and double acting.

    I love Google! Answer: Double-acting baking powder releases some gas
    when it becomes wet and the rest when exposed to oven heat.
    Single-acting baking powders release their gases as soon as they're
    moistened.

    No wonder "they" say to work fast after you have mixed the dry and wet
    ingredients.

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  8. #8
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: baking powder questions


    "Kate Connally" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio

    > In my family we have always used Rumford. It always seems to work> fine
    > for me. And mine is always really old because I don't use
    > it all that often and I'm not about to go buy a new can each time> I bake
    > something. ;-)


    It's something I have to buy and bring here, so I am very careful with it.
    Once opened, the tin stands on its head in the freezer. It lasts 2 years or
    so like that. I have had Calumet, Rumford and Clabber Girl and all were
    fine.



  9. #9
    sf Guest

    Default Re: baking powder questions

    On Thu, 7 Apr 2011 09:34:25 +0200, "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > "Kate Connally" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >
    > > In my family we have always used Rumford. It always seems to work> fine
    > > for me. And mine is always really old because I don't use
    > > it all that often and I'm not about to go buy a new can each time> I bake
    > > something. ;-)

    >
    > It's something I have to buy and bring here, so I am very careful with it.
    > Once opened, the tin stands on its head in the freezer. It lasts 2 years or
    > so like that. I have had Calumet, Rumford and Clabber Girl and all were
    > fine.
    >

    What do people do over there (since baking powder seems so scarce)?
    Use more eggs?

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  10. #10
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: baking powder questions

    In article <[email protected]>,
    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Thu, 7 Apr 2011 09:34:25 +0200, "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > "Kate Connally" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > >
    > > > In my family we have always used Rumford. It always seems to work> fine
    > > > for me. And mine is always really old because I don't use
    > > > it all that often and I'm not about to go buy a new can each time> I bake
    > > > something. ;-)

    > >
    > > It's something I have to buy and bring here, so I am very careful with it.
    > > Once opened, the tin stands on its head in the freezer. It lasts 2 years
    > > or
    > > so like that. I have had Calumet, Rumford and Clabber Girl and all were
    > > fine.
    > >

    > What do people do over there (since baking powder seems so scarce)?
    > Use more eggs?


    Mom used to skip the baking powder and use baking soda, then add yogurt.

    It worked.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinlien

  11. #11
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: baking powder questions


    "sf" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > What do people do over there (since baking powder seems so scarce)?
    > Use more eggs?


    It isn't in as many things as there, but they do have it. It is sold in
    individual packets, like saccarin, with who knows how much in each? Sure, I
    could measure it, but it's expensive that way, over packaged and sometimes
    scented with vanilla!

    Cakes rely more on beaten egg than baking powder, although many recipes do
    have a little in them.



  12. #12
    sf Guest

    Default Re: baking powder questions

    On Fri, 8 Apr 2011 08:02:36 +0200, "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > "sf" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > What do people do over there (since baking powder seems so scarce)?
    > > Use more eggs?

    >
    > It isn't in as many things as there, but they do have it. It is sold in
    > individual packets, like saccarin, with who knows how much in each? Sure, I
    > could measure it, but it's expensive that way, over packaged and sometimes
    > scented with vanilla!


    We pay more for packaging than the contents, that's for sure. I use
    so little baking powder that I'd like to find it in individual
    packets. Oh, have you bought cream of tartar lately? That is
    *expensive*! $4-$.50 for a tiny little container by Shilling, of all
    places.
    >
    > Cakes rely more on beaten egg than baking powder, although many recipes do
    > have a little in them.
    >

    Does baking powder makes cakes less dense than cakes made with all
    eggs for leavening?

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  13. #13
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: baking powder questions


    "sf" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Fri, 8 Apr 2011 08:02:36 +0200, "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote:


    > packets. Oh, have you bought cream of tartar lately? That is>
    > *expensive*! $4-$.50 for a tiny little container by Shilling, of all>
    > places.
    >>
    >> Cakes rely more on beaten egg than baking powder, although many recipes
    >> do
    >> have a little in them.
    >>

    > Does baking powder makes cakes less dense than cakes made with all
    > eggs for leavening?


    Yes, lighter and less moist IMO.
    Cream of Tartar is not sold here. It is made from the scrapings of Italian
    wine barrels and that is shipped to the USA where they produce cream of
    tartar, but they don't ship it back here. Why? I don't know. Certainly
    baking powder here must have it? Or maybe there's another form of acid they
    use.



  14. #14
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: baking powder questions



    "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:90ag6hF3prU1@mid.individual.net[email protected]..
    >
    > "sf" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> On Fri, 8 Apr 2011 08:02:36 +0200, "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >> packets. Oh, have you bought cream of tartar lately? That is>
    >> *expensive*! $4-$.50 for a tiny little container by Shilling, of all>
    >> places.
    >>>
    >>> Cakes rely more on beaten egg than baking powder, although many recipes
    >>> do
    >>> have a little in them.
    >>>

    >> Does baking powder makes cakes less dense than cakes made with all
    >> eggs for leavening?

    >
    > Yes, lighter and less moist IMO.
    > Cream of Tartar is not sold here. It is made from the scrapings of
    > Italian wine barrels and that is shipped to the USA where they produce
    > cream of tartar, but they don't ship it back here. Why? I don't know.
    > Certainly baking powder here must have it? Or maybe there's another form
    > of acid they use.


    http://frugalliving.about.com/od/con...ing_Powder.htm

    Ingredients:
    •1 teaspoon baking soda
    •2 teaspoons cream of tartar
    •1 teaspoon corn starch (optional)
    Preparation:
    Mix the baking soda and cream of tartar together until well combined. Use
    immediately.

    --
    --

    https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/


  15. #15
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: baking powder questions

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote:


    > Cream of Tartar is not sold here. It is made from the scrapings of Italian
    > wine barrels and that is shipped to the USA where they produce cream of
    > tartar, but they don't ship it back here. Why? I don't know.


    I don't know either. That makes no sense. They must throw away tons of
    the stuff around here, why would they import it from Italy? And why is
    it so expensive?

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  16. #16
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: baking powder questions


    "Dan Abel" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio news:dabel-
    > "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >> Cream of Tartar is not sold here. It is made from the scrapings of
    >> Italian
    >> wine barrels and that is shipped to the USA where they produce cream of
    >> tartar, but they don't ship it back here. Why? I don't know.

    >
    > I don't know either. That makes no sense. They must throw away tons of
    > the stuff around here, why would they import it from Italy? And why is >
    > it so expensive?


    I think you have an exaggerated idea of how much American wine is made in
    wooden barrels. As to why it is expensive, dunno. Ask them!



  17. #17
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: baking powder questions

    On Sun, 10 Apr 2011 09:34:55 +0200, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Dan Abel" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio news:dabel-
    >> "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> Cream of Tartar is not sold here. It is made from the scrapings of
    >>> Italian
    >>> wine barrels and that is shipped to the USA where they produce cream of
    >>> tartar, but they don't ship it back here. Why? I don't know.

    >>
    >> I don't know either. That makes no sense. They must throw away tons of
    >> the stuff around here, why would they import it from Italy? And why is >
    >> it so expensive?

    >
    >I think you have an exaggerated idea of how much American wine is made in
    >wooden barrels. As to why it is expensive, dunno. Ask them!
    >


    Curiosity killed the cat-- Do you have any numbers? I just read
    that those oak barrels can cost up to $800 each. How many do *we*
    [the US] use and how many does Italy use? [Does Italy use native
    oaks-- or imported?]

    Jim

  18. #18
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: baking powder questions

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Dan Abel" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio news:dabel-
    > > "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Cream of Tartar is not sold here. It is made from the scrapings of
    > >> Italian
    > >> wine barrels and that is shipped to the USA where they produce cream of
    > >> tartar, but they don't ship it back here. Why? I don't know.

    > >
    > > I don't know either. That makes no sense. They must throw away tons of
    > > the stuff around here, why would they import it from Italy? And why is >
    > > it so expensive?

    >
    > I think you have an exaggerated idea of how much American wine is made in
    > wooden barrels. As to why it is expensive, dunno. Ask them!


    By "around here", I didn't mean the entire US. I live close to a
    premium wine area for the US.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  19. #19
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: baking powder questions


    "Jim Elbrecht" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:


    >>I think you have an exaggerated idea of how much American wine is made in
    >>wooden barrels. As to why it is expensive, dunno. Ask them!
    >>

    >
    > Curiosity killed the cat-- Do you have any numbers? I just read
    > that those oak barrels can cost up to $800 each. How many do *we*
    > [the US] use and how many does Italy use? [Does Italy use native
    > oaks-- or imported?]


    Ni numbers. I heard a report on a food and wine show on TV and was shocked
    to hear that what I could not buy here started here. How many? Well,
    everyone Italian I know outside of cities makes wine. They all make it in
    wooden barrels. Many wines are DOC or DOP and therefore have to be made in
    the traditional manner, which is wooden barrels. I guess that's why they
    have it to sell.
    My neighbor almost disappears inside his 5 foot wide barrels when he cleans
    them,. His wife hangs onto his clothes while he scrapes. People have been
    known to be overcome in there, so she takes no chances.

    I believe the barrels are made of US oak unless they are by tradition sherry
    barrels which come from Spain. I saw a program on barrel making, too!



  20. #20
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: baking powder questions

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote:


    > "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:

    >
    > >>I think you have an exaggerated idea of how much American wine is made in
    > >>wooden barrels.


    > I believe the barrels are made of US oak unless they are by tradition sherry
    > barrels which come from Spain. I saw a program on barrel making, too!


    That's funny! A snooty winery near me (about 30 miles) says:

    http://www.robertmondavi.com/rmw/winemaking/winegrowing

    "Robert Mondavi Winery only uses French Oak barrels for storing its
    wines. The degree to which the barrel uses new French oak will vary
    depending on the how the wine is destined to be bottled. Reserve wines
    will typically be in the barrels with 80-100% new French Oak. Other
    wines will use lower amounts depending on the style and variety of the
    wine in barrel."

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

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