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Thread: baby bok choy

  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default baby bok choy


    I've enjoyed this many times in restaurants but never cooked it at home
    and want to cook it tonight....any recipes or suggestions would be very
    much appreciated.
    Thanks,
    Ellie


  2. #2
    aem Guest

    Default Re: baby bok choy

    On Jul 10, 12:49*pm, ellie1...@webtv.net wrote:
    > I've enjoyed this many times in restaurants but never cooked it at home
    > and want to cook it tonight....any recipes or suggestions would be very
    > much appreciated.


    Wash it, leave them whole if they're small (trimming off the root
    end), or cut in 2" pieces if they're large and you feel like it.
    Slice 2 or 3 pieces of fresh ginger. Heat a wok or heavy pan very
    hot, add 1 or 2 TB of peanut oil (or some neutral oil, not olive),
    toss in the ginger slices for a few seconds as the oil continues to
    get really hot. Now add the bok choy and stir until all has a little
    sheen from the oil and the leaves begin to wilt. If the residual
    water from washing it is not still producing steam add a bit more--
    maybe 1/4 cup. Pinch of salt, optional pinch of sugar, optional half
    pinch of msg. I always add the sugar, sometimes the msg. Remove the
    ginger slices and serve. Total cooking time in the neighborhood of 2
    minutes.

    You can also just drop the bok choy in a big pot of boiling water for
    a minute, but then you don't get the delicate infusion of ginger
    flavor.

    We had a tasty variation in Shanghai once. (so-called baby bok choy
    are really a different plant from the larger, whiter variety. Their
    real name is Shanghai bok choy.) They were left whole and stir-fried/
    steamed as describe above, then lined up on a platter. A row of
    whole, medium-sized shiitakes were arranged below them. The mushrooms
    had been stirred quickly in oil and then simmered until soft. -aem



  3. #3
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: baby bok choy

    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I've enjoyed this many times in restaurants but never cooked it at home
    >and want to cook it tonight....any recipes or suggestions would be very
    >much appreciated.


    I like slicing the bok choy lengthwise in two, dressing it
    with tamari, sesame oil, rice vinegar, and pepper, and
    setting it on a lightly greased pan under the broiler
    for five to seven minutes.

    Steve

  4. #4
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: baby bok choy

    ellie1...@webtv.net wrote:
    > I've enjoyed this many times in restaurants but never cooked it at home
    > and want to cook it tonight....any recipes or suggestions would be very
    > much appreciated.


    Baby bok choy is essentially a dwarf variety of regular bok choy (not
    harvested prematurely), there are various versions of each... any bok
    choy recipe can be used with either... just don't over cook...bok choy
    is more about texture. Bok choy is really two sepasrate vegetables,
    the stalks and the leaves I like to eat the stalks raw with a dipping
    sauce and add the leaves to light soups.

    Epicurious has many recipes:
    http://www.epicurious.com/tools/sear...y%20bok%20choy

  5. #5
    Kswck Guest

    Default Re: baby bok choy


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > I've enjoyed this many times in restaurants but never cooked it at home
    > and want to cook it tonight....any recipes or suggestions would be very
    > much appreciated.
    > Thanks,
    > Ellie
    >


    Baby is also called shanghai cabbage (in some asian markets).
    It is good in a stir fry with fresh grated ginger, fresh garlic, shallots
    and something like a toasted or spicy sesame oil.



  6. #6
    Mark A.Meggs Guest

    Default Re: baby bok choy

    On Thu, 10 Jul 2008 20:16:33 +0000 (UTC), [email protected]
    (Steve Pope) wrote:

    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>I've enjoyed this many times in restaurants but never cooked it at home
    >>and want to cook it tonight....any recipes or suggestions would be very
    >>much appreciated.

    >
    >I like slicing the bok choy lengthwise in two, dressing it
    >with tamari, sesame oil, rice vinegar, and pepper, and
    >setting it on a lightly greased pan under the broiler
    >for five to seven minutes.
    >
    >Steve


    I like to slice it length-wise, steam it, then use a similar dressing
    ( I may add a pinch of sugar to the dressing).

    - Mark

  7. #7
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: baby bok choy

    On Thu, 10 Jul 2008 12:49:56 -0700, [email protected] wrote:

    >
    >I've enjoyed this many times in restaurants but never cooked it at home
    >and want to cook it tonight....any recipes or suggestions would be very
    >much appreciated.
    >Thanks,
    >Ellie



    We're growing even smaller versions of it this year - dwarf bok choy.
    It is picked at 2."

    Lovely stuff. We stir fry it with garlic, a bit of rice wine vinegar
    and a dash of soy sauce.

    Boron

  8. #8
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: baby bok choy

    Boron wrote on Thu, 10 Jul 2008 21:01:46 -0400:

    >> I've enjoyed this many times in restaurants but never cooked
    >> it at home and want to cook it tonight....any recipes or
    >> suggestions would be very much appreciated. Thanks, Ellie


    > We're growing even smaller versions of it this year - dwarf
    > bok choy. It is picked at 2."


    > Lovely stuff. We stir fry it with garlic, a bit of rice wine
    > vinegar and a dash of soy sauce.


    It's good stuff in stir-fries, blanched in Chinese and Japanese cold
    noodle salads etc. One of the most unusual uses was in a recipe for
    Scotch Broth (for real!)

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  9. #9
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: baby bok choy

    On Fri, 11 Jul 2008 12:15:42 GMT, "James Silverton"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Boron wrote on Thu, 10 Jul 2008 21:01:46 -0400:
    >
    >>> I've enjoyed this many times in restaurants but never cooked
    >>> it at home and want to cook it tonight....any recipes or
    >>> suggestions would be very much appreciated. Thanks, Ellie

    >
    >> We're growing even smaller versions of it this year - dwarf
    >> bok choy. It is picked at 2."

    >
    >> Lovely stuff. We stir fry it with garlic, a bit of rice wine
    >> vinegar and a dash of soy sauce.

    >
    >It's good stuff in stir-fries, blanched in Chinese and Japanese cold
    >noodle salads etc. One of the most unusual uses was in a recipe for
    >Scotch Broth (for real!)



    It is a nice "green" to add to soups. Think of escarole soup.

    Boron

  10. #10
    Chile Fiend Guest

    Default Re: baby bok choy

    [email protected] wrote in news:3578-487667E4-179@storefull-
    3337.bay.webtv.net:

    >
    > I've enjoyed this many times in restaurants but never cooked it at home
    > and want to cook it tonight....any recipes or suggestions would be very
    > much appreciated.
    > Thanks,
    > Ellie
    >
    >


    I like it stir fried or simmered in some sesame oil and chiken broth, with
    garlic, ginger, onions, and hot peppers. Sometimes I'll add pork, chiken or
    tofu to round it out.

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