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Thread: Avert your eyes if you have set ideas about chili

  1. #1
    sf Guest

    Default Avert your eyes if you have set ideas about chili


    Because I broke every rule in the book. I used, chicken, beans and a
    commercial chili powder mix. So stop right here if you have a problem
    with any of them.

    Chicken and Chorizo Chili by sf
    Use linguica if you can’t find Spanish chorizo (fresh)

    2 links (about 6 ounces) fresh Spanish-style chorizo sausage or
    linguica – if using linguica, cut into chunks and pulse in the food
    processor until it looks like hamburger.
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    2 lbs pounds boneless skinless chicken thighs, cut into ½-inch pieces
    Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
    1 teaspoon each granulated garlic (or chop up 3-4 cloves of fresh) and
    oregano
    1 medium yellow onion, diced into large pieces
    2 tablespoons chili powder
    1 teaspoon ground cumin
    cayenne or other hot pepper to taste
    ½ cup broth or water (I used beef broth)
    Cayenne to taste
    15 ounce can Mexican style stewed tomatoes (see Note)
    10 ounce can store brand petit diced tomatoes with green chilies (or
    Rotel)
    15 ounce can black beans, drained and rinsed (I used the one with
    jalapeños, so I drained but didn’t rinse and cut the jalapeño into
    smaller pieces)
    15 ounce can of pinto beans, drained and rinsed

    1. Crumble the sausage into a large pan and sauté until cooked
    through, but not brown. Remove sausage from the pan and heat the oil
    to sauté the chicken. Blot chicken dry and season with salt and
    pepper. Cook chicken in 2-3 batches, allowing it to brown a little
    before removing from pan, about 5 minutes per batch; reserve.

    2. Reduce heat. Add onion and chorizo to pot and cook until sausage is
    well rendered and onions are completely soft, about 8 minutes. Stir in
    chili powder and cumin, cook 1 minute. Add tomatoes that have been
    pulverized in the food processor; add chicken, garlic, oregano and 1/2
    cup water or broth. Bring mixture to a simmer; reduce heat and cook,
    covered, for 20 minutes. Take the lid off at 10 minutes to see if it’s
    reducing. Taste and add some cayenne, if you want it hotter/spicier.

    3. Add beans and simmer, uncovered, until chicken is tender and chili
    has thickened, about 10 to 15 minutes more. Taste one last time to
    check for seasoning.

    Note: If you think tomatoes with chilies will be too hot, use a 28
    ounce can of peeled whole tomatoes that have been broken up in the
    food processor, the chunkiness factor is up to you.

    I serve the chili with cornbread. The recipe I used was equal parts
    flour and cornmeal (next time I will try ¾ cup flour to 1¼ cup
    cornmeal), ¼ cup sugar (so shoot me) and buttermilk. I didn’t mess
    around with a cast iron skillet – just put it into an ordinary metal
    pan (square) and baked for 20 minutes.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  2. #2
    gtr Guest

    Default Re: Avert your eyes if you have set ideas about chili

    On 2012-07-12 21:51:26 +0000, sf said:

    > Because I broke every rule in the book. I used, chicken, beans and a
    > commercial chili powder mix. So stop right here if you have a problem
    > with any of them.


    Looks tasty to me!

    I think there should be as many rules with chili as their are sandiches: None.


  3. #3
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: Avert your eyes if you have set ideas about chili


    sf wrote:
    >
    > Because I broke every rule in the book. I used, chicken, beans and a
    > commercial chili powder mix. So stop right here if you have a problem
    > with any of them.
    >
    > Chicken and Chorizo Chili by sf
    > Use linguica if you can’t find Spanish chorizo (fresh)
    >
    > 2 links (about 6 ounces) fresh Spanish-style chorizo sausage or
    > linguica – if using linguica, cut into chunks and pulse in the food
    > processor until it looks like hamburger.
    > 2 tablespoons olive oil
    > 2 lbs pounds boneless skinless chicken thighs, cut into ½-inch pieces
    > Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
    > 1 teaspoon each granulated garlic (or chop up 3-4 cloves of fresh) and
    > oregano
    > 1 medium yellow onion, diced into large pieces
    > 2 tablespoons chili powder
    > 1 teaspoon ground cumin
    > cayenne or other hot pepper to taste
    > ½ cup broth or water (I used beef broth)
    > Cayenne to taste
    > 15 ounce can Mexican style stewed tomatoes (see Note)
    > 10 ounce can store brand petit diced tomatoes with green chilies (or
    > Rotel)
    > 15 ounce can black beans, drained and rinsed (I used the one with
    > jalapeños, so I drained but didn’t rinse and cut the jalapeño into
    > smaller pieces)
    > 15 ounce can of pinto beans, drained and rinsed
    >
    > 1. Crumble the sausage into a large pan and sauté until cooked
    > through, but not brown. Remove sausage from the pan and heat the oil
    > to sauté the chicken. Blot chicken dry and season with salt and
    > pepper. Cook chicken in 2-3 batches, allowing it to brown a little
    > before removing from pan, about 5 minutes per batch; reserve.
    >
    > 2. Reduce heat. Add onion and chorizo to pot and cook until sausage is
    > well rendered and onions are completely soft, about 8 minutes. Stir in
    > chili powder and cumin, cook 1 minute. Add tomatoes that have been
    > pulverized in the food processor; add chicken, garlic, oregano and 1/2
    > cup water or broth. Bring mixture to a simmer; reduce heat and cook,
    > covered, for 20 minutes. Take the lid off at 10 minutes to see if it’s
    > reducing. Taste and add some cayenne, if you want it hotter/spicier.
    >
    > 3. Add beans and simmer, uncovered, until chicken is tender and chili
    > has thickened, about 10 to 15 minutes more. Taste one last time to
    > check for seasoning.
    >
    > Note: If you think tomatoes with chilies will be too hot, use a 28
    > ounce can of peeled whole tomatoes that have been broken up in the
    > food processor, the chunkiness factor is up to you.
    >
    > I serve the chili with cornbread. The recipe I used was equal parts
    > flour and cornmeal (next time I will try ¾ cup flour to 1¼ cup
    > cornmeal), ¼ cup sugar (so shoot me) and buttermilk. I didn’t mess
    > around with a cast iron skillet – just put it into an ordinary metal
    > pan (square) and baked for 20 minutes.
    >
    > --
    > Food is an important part of a balanced diet.


    You'd probably get shot if you tried to call that chili in Texas, but if
    you call it stew or goulash you could probably get away with it.

  4. #4
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: Avert your eyes if you have set ideas about chili

    sf wrote:

    > Because I broke every rule in the book. I used, chicken, beans and a
    > commercial chili powder mix. So stop right here if you have a problem
    > with any of them.


    You left out how well your eaters liked it. Or maybe you cook for a
    tableful of human Hoovers who don't care. I've cooked for people like
    that. You have to hide the salt and ketchup when they're at your
    table.



  5. #5
    Cheri Guest

    Default Re: Avert your eyes if you have set ideas about chili

    "gtr" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:2012071215151768926-xxx@yyyzzz...
    > On 2012-07-12 21:51:26 +0000, sf said:
    >
    >> Because I broke every rule in the book. I used, chicken, beans and a
    >> commercial chili powder mix. So stop right here if you have a problem
    >> with any of them.

    >
    > Looks tasty to me!
    >
    > I think there should be as many rules with chili as their are sandiches:
    > None.



    Looks good to me too.

    Cheri


  6. #6
    Gorio Guest

    Default Re: Avert your eyes if you have set ideas about chili


    'Cheri[_3_ Wrote:
    > ;1757020']"gtr" [email protected] wrote in message
    > news:2012071215151768926-xxx@yyyzzz...-
    > On 2012-07-12 21:51:26 +0000, sf said:
    > -
    > Because I broke every rule in the book. I used, chicken, beans and a
    > commercial chili powder mix. So stop right here if you have a problem
    > with any of them.-
    >
    > Looks tasty to me!
    >
    > I think there should be as many rules with chili as their are
    > sandiches:
    > None.-
    >
    >
    > Looks good to me too.
    >
    > Cheri


    I've made something similar to this; black beans, too. Had some leftover
    chicken pulled off the bone and I just threw it together and it turned
    out very well.

    Glad you put it in print. Might make it again this weekend.

    The only thing I see very different was that i added celery and fresh
    pressed gahlick. I bets most would like this if they tried it; Hoover
    crowd or not.




    --
    Gorio

  7. #7
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Avert your eyes if you have set ideas about chili


    "Pete C." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:4fff4d57$0$14774$[email protected] .com...
    >
    > sf wrote:
    >>
    >> Because I broke every rule in the book. I used, chicken, beans and a
    >> commercial chili powder mix. So stop right here if you have a problem
    >> with any of them.
    >>
    >> Chicken and Chorizo Chili by sf
    >> Use linguica if you can't find Spanish chorizo (fresh)
    >>

    (snipped and saved)

    (snippage)

    > You'd probably get shot if you tried to call that chili in Texas, but if
    > you call it stew or goulash you could probably get away with it.



    If you're trying to start the beans vs. no beans in chili argument again,
    who gives a rip about what people in Texas think? No beans no tomatoes
    chili looks like something the dog threw up.

    Thanks, Barbara, for posting the recipe It doesn't matter if you don't
    use a cast iron skillet for cornbread. I do, but that's just me

    Jill


  8. #8
    gtr Guest

    Default Re: Avert your eyes if you have set ideas about chili

    On 2012-07-15 14:38:54 +0000, jmcquown said:

    >> You'd probably get shot if you tried to call that chili in Texas, but if
    >> you call it stew or goulash you could probably get away with it.

    >
    > If you're trying to start the beans vs. no beans in chili argument
    > again, who gives a rip about what people in Texas think?


    Predominantly; Texans. It's understandable; they have a great state
    pride in their beef and therefore in the sanctity of their "beef
    paste". Logicially if they were the bean-growing capital of the
    country they might be more interested in a "been paste" concoction.


  9. #9
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Avert your eyes if you have set ideas about chili

    On 2012-07-15, jmcquown <[email protected]> wrote:

    > If you're trying to start the beans vs. no beans in chili argument again,
    > who gives a rip about what people in Texas think? No beans no tomatoes
    > chili looks like something the dog threw up.


    LOL!....

    Yep. The only place I use chili w/o beans is with Philly cream cheese in a
    chip dip.

    I recently attended an itty-bitty chili cook-off. Only five
    contestents. I think the town's pop was about 17. Anyway, one guy
    was starting his chili and I noticed everything came from a can.
    Beans, chilis, spices, sauce, etc. I forget what he was using fer
    meat, but his smelled better'n anyone elses. We got to talking and he
    told me wuz once a purist, but got tired of such nonsense. Now, he
    used only canned, frozen, and packaged food. Said he won more
    contests than when he cooked with only the freshest ingredients.

    nb


    -- vi --the heart of evil!



  10. #10
    gtr Guest

    Default Re: Avert your eyes if you have set ideas about chili

    On 2012-07-15 15:27:07 +0000, notbob said:

    > I recently attended an itty-bitty chili cook-off. Only five
    > contestents. I think the town's pop was about 17. Anyway, one guy
    > was starting his chili and I noticed everything came from a can.
    > Beans, chilis, spices, sauce, etc. I forget what he was using fer
    > meat, but his smelled better'n anyone elses. We got to talking and he
    > told me wuz once a purist, but got tired of such nonsense. Now, he
    > used only canned, frozen, and packaged food. Said he won more
    > contests than when he cooked with only the freshest ingredients.


    Well at least it provides him consistency. If you're doing this regular
    I guess that makes sense.

    >
    > nb
    >
    >
    > -- vi --the heart of evil!


    OT: Do you use vi, or really hate it, or what. What's with this. I
    spent a couple of decades living in unix and vi was my dominant access
    to code. I have it on the Mac and sometimes need it but it's slightly
    different and so off-putting.


  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Avert your eyes if you have set ideas about chili

    On Sun, 15 Jul 2012 10:38:54 -0400, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Thanks, Barbara, for posting the recipe It doesn't matter if you don't
    > use a cast iron skillet for cornbread. I do, but that's just me


    Thanks, Jill! I use my cast iron skillet (which is not a dedicated
    pan) most of the time, but I just didn't want to bother with it this
    time. I don't like crust anyway so the reason for baking in cast iron
    is wasted on me.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  12. #12
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: Avert your eyes if you have set ideas about chili

    gtr wrote:
    > notbob said:
    >
    >> -- vi --the heart of evil!

    >
    > OT: Do you use vi, or really hate it, or what. What's with this. I
    > spent a couple of decades living in unix and vi was my dominant access
    > to code. I have it on the Mac and sometimes need it but it's slightly
    > different and so off-putting.


    Back around 1980 when I still worked on VMS a friend took me into a lab
    to see a minicomputer small enough you could roll it around. It ran
    UNIX. He started an editor. It started beeping. He said. "That's vi
    for you. It goes into beep mode and then what do you do?"

    I've used vi for decades at this point. I'm good enough at it I rarely
    care if it's displaying on the screen. In my job a lot of times it is
    not displaying on the screen and that's why I was calld in. I don't
    have to *like* vi I just have to be *good at using it*.

    Do folks have good recipes for heart of evil? I figure you'd have to go
    back to the whaling days to find recipes that deal with animals big
    enough but if we dice it it should be like dealing with diced cow
    hearts, several of them together. ;^)

    New idea for a Valentine Day episode of Chopped. Heart of palm in the
    appetizer round. Heart of evil in the entre' round. I'd do it as heart
    of hart. Venison heart is very tasty but tough. Heart of artichoke in
    the dessert round.

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