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Thread: Asparagus Soup

  1. #1
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Asparagus Soup

    I cooked the spears in a skillet with water and reserved the cooking
    liquid (maybe 1 cup).

    I made a roux of butter, flour, and about 1/3 cup minced onion and
    cooked it slowly for a few minutes. While that was happening, I cut the
    spears into 1/2" pieces.

    I dumped in the reserved liquid, a tablespoon of low-salt chicken base,
    about a quart of water, a small handful of dried leaf celery (crumbled)
    and a small handful of dehydrated New Zealand spinach (crumbled), the
    asparagus cuts and brought it a boil.

    At serving time I heated a bowlful and then added about 1/4 cup half and
    half and a couple grinds of black pepper.

    It's tasty. And mine, all mine.

    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller - good news 4-6-2009
    "Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a great battle."
    -Philo of Alexandria

  2. #2
    PickyJaz Guest

    Default Re: Asparagus Soup

    On May 21, 3:44*pm, Melba's Jammin' <barbschal...@earthlink.net>
    wrote:
    > Recipe-method snipped....
    > It's tasty. *And mine, all mine.

    Well, %$#nit, next time double and invite me...;-( Sounds extra
    tasty. I'll be going for take-out at a local, superior Mexican place
    to pick up a favorite, as good as mine but without my time and work,
    huev's-ranch dinner with an extra cheesy, light salsa quesadiller on
    the side. Learned something interesting on the Food channel about
    choosing Ortegas that I'll be trying next time 'round with this cook:
    straight stems are the milder chilis, while the stems that curl
    indicate more heat.
    ....Pouting, soon to be grinning Picks

  3. #3
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Asparagus Soup

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I cooked the spears in a skillet with water and reserved the cooking
    > liquid (maybe 1 cup).
    >
    > I made a roux of butter, flour, and about 1/3 cup minced onion and
    > cooked it slowly for a few minutes. While that was happening, I cut the
    > spears into 1/2" pieces.
    >
    > I dumped in the reserved liquid, a tablespoon of low-salt chicken base,
    > about a quart of water, a small handful of dried leaf celery (crumbled)
    > and a small handful of dehydrated New Zealand spinach (crumbled), the
    > asparagus cuts and brought it a boil.
    >
    > At serving time I heated a bowlful and then added about 1/4 cup half and
    > half and a couple grinds of black pepper.
    >
    > It's tasty. And mine, all mine.


    Sounds good from here. ;-d

    The only thing I really do differently from a basic asparagus soup is to
    take the tough ends I snapped, cook those down first and run them thru
    the china cap to get an asparagus mash to add back the soup.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
    It's about learning to dance in the rain.
    -- Anon.

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  4. #4
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Asparagus Soup

    On Thu, 21 May 2009 20:59:11 -0500, Omelet <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >The only thing I really do differently from a basic asparagus soup is to
    >take the tough ends I snapped, cook those down first and run them thru
    >the china cap to get an asparagus mash to add back the soup.


    Holy carp, where did you find an affordable China Cap? I've wanted
    one for decades, but I don't buy it after I look at the price.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  5. #5
    pamjd Guest

    Default Re: Asparagus Soup

    estate sales usually have china cap with or with out legs if the owner
    did any canning unless what I am mistaking what china cap you are
    talking about. A new one is usually under $20 at hardware stores
    around here.

  6. #6
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Asparagus Soup

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    PickyJaz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On May 21, 3:44*pm, Melba's Jammin' <barbschal...@earthlink.net>
    > wrote:
    > > Recipe-method snipped....
    > > It's tasty. *And mine, all mine.

    > Well, %$#nit, next time double and invite me...;-(


    Lissen, Dearie, my door's allus open for you. There's still zoop in the
    fridge; I may fix some for breakfast. A couple of phone calls have just
    turned my day inside out. Light a candle, eh?
    (snip)
    > choosing Ortegas that I'll be trying next time 'round with this cook:
    > straight stems are the milder chilis, while the stems that curl
    > indicate more heat.


    Hah! That's interesting to know! Thanks.
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller - good news 4-6-2009
    "Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a great battle."
    -Philo of Alexandria

  7. #7
    Zeppo Guest

    Default Re: Asparagus Soup


    "Omelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]..
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I cooked the spears in a skillet with water and reserved the cooking
    >> liquid (maybe 1 cup).
    >>
    >> I made a roux of butter, flour, and about 1/3 cup minced onion and
    >> cooked it slowly for a few minutes. While that was happening, I cut the
    >> spears into 1/2" pieces.
    >>
    >> I dumped in the reserved liquid, a tablespoon of low-salt chicken base,
    >> about a quart of water, a small handful of dried leaf celery (crumbled)
    >> and a small handful of dehydrated New Zealand spinach (crumbled), the
    >> asparagus cuts and brought it a boil.
    >>
    >> At serving time I heated a bowlful and then added about 1/4 cup half and
    >> half and a couple grinds of black pepper.
    >>
    >> It's tasty. And mine, all mine.

    >
    > Sounds good from here. ;-d
    >
    > The only thing I really do differently from a basic asparagus soup is to
    > take the tough ends I snapped, cook those down first and run them thru
    > the china cap to get an asparagus mash to add back the soup.


    Hi Om,
    Would a food mill work the same way for the woody ends?

    Jon



  8. #8
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Asparagus Soup

    On Fri, 22 May 2009 04:17:46 -0700 (PDT), pamjd <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >estate sales usually have china cap with or with out legs if the owner
    >did any canning unless what I am mistaking what china cap you are
    >talking about. A new one is usually under $20 at hardware stores
    >around here.


    I'm thinking big (capacity in quarts) - a solid piece of metal with
    lots of holes. If what I've seen was only $20 new, I would have had
    one a long time ago. We don't have many hardware stores around here.
    I'll try to find one and see what they have. Hardware stores are
    always good for basic old fashioned cookware. I've never thought of a
    china cap as hardware store material before though. I went into high
    end cooking shops and restaurant supply stores to drool and be scared
    away by the prices (the last one I looked at was around $100), but in
    fact - a small one would suit my purposes just fine these days.
    Thanks!

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  9. #9
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Asparagus Soup

    On Fri, 22 May 2009 10:07:24 -0400, "Zeppo" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Omelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news[email protected]..
    >>
    >> The only thing I really do differently from a basic asparagus soup is to
    >> take the tough ends I snapped, cook those down first and run them thru
    >> the china cap to get an asparagus mash to add back the soup.

    >
    >Hi Om,
    >Would a food mill work the same way for the woody ends?
    >

    Most likely. Use what you've got.


    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  10. #10
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Asparagus Soup

    In article <[email protected]>,
    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Thu, 21 May 2009 20:59:11 -0500, Omelet <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >The only thing I really do differently from a basic asparagus soup is to
    > >take the tough ends I snapped, cook those down first and run them thru
    > >the china cap to get an asparagus mash to add back the soup.

    >
    > Holy carp, where did you find an affordable China Cap? I've wanted
    > one for decades, but I don't buy it after I look at the price.


    I inherited it from mom... <sigh>

    A Victorio strainer also works for such jobs but is, while less work to
    use, more work to clean. I also got that from mom. She used it
    religiously to remove skins and seeds to make grape and blackberry or
    dewberry jelly.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
    It's about learning to dance in the rain.
    -- Anon.

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  11. #11
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Asparagus Soup

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Zeppo" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Omelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news[email protected]..
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> I cooked the spears in a skillet with water and reserved the cooking
    > >> liquid (maybe 1 cup).
    > >>
    > >> I made a roux of butter, flour, and about 1/3 cup minced onion and
    > >> cooked it slowly for a few minutes. While that was happening, I cut the
    > >> spears into 1/2" pieces.
    > >>
    > >> I dumped in the reserved liquid, a tablespoon of low-salt chicken base,
    > >> about a quart of water, a small handful of dried leaf celery (crumbled)
    > >> and a small handful of dehydrated New Zealand spinach (crumbled), the
    > >> asparagus cuts and brought it a boil.
    > >>
    > >> At serving time I heated a bowlful and then added about 1/4 cup half and
    > >> half and a couple grinds of black pepper.
    > >>
    > >> It's tasty. And mine, all mine.

    > >
    > > Sounds good from here. ;-d
    > >
    > > The only thing I really do differently from a basic asparagus soup is to
    > > take the tough ends I snapped, cook those down first and run them thru
    > > the china cap to get an asparagus mash to add back the soup.

    >
    > Hi Om,
    > Would a food mill work the same way for the woody ends?
    >
    > Jon


    Yes indeedy! And probably take less muscle work. <g>
    Freeze the woody ends until you have a batch large enough to mess with.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
    It's about learning to dance in the rain.
    -- Anon.

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  12. #12
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Asparagus Soup

    In article <[email protected]>,
    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Fri, 22 May 2009 04:17:46 -0700 (PDT), pamjd <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >estate sales usually have china cap with or with out legs if the owner
    > >did any canning unless what I am mistaking what china cap you are
    > >talking about. A new one is usually under $20 at hardware stores
    > >around here.

    >
    > I'm thinking big (capacity in quarts) - a solid piece of metal with
    > lots of holes. If what I've seen was only $20 new, I would have had
    > one a long time ago. We don't have many hardware stores around here.
    > I'll try to find one and see what they have. Hardware stores are
    > always good for basic old fashioned cookware. I've never thought of a
    > china cap as hardware store material before though. I went into high
    > end cooking shops and restaurant supply stores to drool and be scared
    > away by the prices (the last one I looked at was around $100), but in
    > fact - a small one would suit my purposes just fine these days.
    > Thanks!


    <lol> My china cap certainly is not a large one! :-)
    --
    Peace! Om

    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
    It's about learning to dance in the rain.
    -- Anon.

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  13. #13
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Asparagus Soup

    On Fri, 22 May 2009 12:52:24 -0500, Omelet wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Fri, 22 May 2009 04:17:46 -0700 (PDT), pamjd <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>estate sales usually have china cap with or with out legs if the owner
    >>>did any canning unless what I am mistaking what china cap you are
    >>>talking about. A new one is usually under $20 at hardware stores
    >>>around here.

    >>
    >> I'm thinking big (capacity in quarts) - a solid piece of metal with
    >> lots of holes. If what I've seen was only $20 new, I would have had
    >> one a long time ago. We don't have many hardware stores around here.
    >> I'll try to find one and see what they have. Hardware stores are
    >> always good for basic old fashioned cookware. I've never thought of a
    >> china cap as hardware store material before though. I went into high
    >> end cooking shops and restaurant supply stores to drool and be scared
    >> away by the prices (the last one I looked at was around $100), but in
    >> fact - a small one would suit my purposes just fine these days.
    >> Thanks!

    >
    > <lol> My china cap certainly is not a large one! :-)


    god damn it, every time i see 'china cap' i still think 'dutch cap.'

    your pal,
    blake

  14. #14
    rosie Guest

    Default Re: Asparagus Soup

    On May 21, 11:51�pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > On Thu, 21 May 2009 20:59:11 -0500, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > >The only thing I really do differently from a basic asparagus soup is to
    > >take the tough ends I snapped, cook those down first and run them thru
    > >the china cap to get an asparagus mash to add back the soup.

    >
    > Holy carp, where did you find an affordable China Cap? �I've wanted
    > one for decades, but I don't buy it after I look at the price.
    >
    > --
    > I love cooking with wine.
    > Sometimes I even put it in the food.


    What on earth is a China Cap?? Sound like some sort of birthcontrol
    device...

    Rosie

  15. #15
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Asparagus Soup

    In article <[email protected]>,
    blake murphy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Fri, 22 May 2009 12:52:24 -0500, Omelet wrote:
    >
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> On Fri, 22 May 2009 04:17:46 -0700 (PDT), pamjd <[email protected]>
    > >> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>>estate sales usually have china cap with or with out legs if the owner
    > >>>did any canning unless what I am mistaking what china cap you are
    > >>>talking about. A new one is usually under $20 at hardware stores
    > >>>around here.
    > >>
    > >> I'm thinking big (capacity in quarts) - a solid piece of metal with
    > >> lots of holes. If what I've seen was only $20 new, I would have had
    > >> one a long time ago. We don't have many hardware stores around here.
    > >> I'll try to find one and see what they have. Hardware stores are
    > >> always good for basic old fashioned cookware. I've never thought of a
    > >> china cap as hardware store material before though. I went into high
    > >> end cooking shops and restaurant supply stores to drool and be scared
    > >> away by the prices (the last one I looked at was around $100), but in
    > >> fact - a small one would suit my purposes just fine these days.
    > >> Thanks!

    > >
    > > <lol> My china cap certainly is not a large one! :-)

    >
    > god damn it, every time i see 'china cap' i still think 'dutch cap.'
    >
    > your pal,
    > blake


    Why? :-)
    --
    Peace! Om

    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
    It's about learning to dance in the rain.
    -- Anon.

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  16. #16
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Asparagus Soup

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    rosie <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On May 21, 11:51?pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > > On Thu, 21 May 2009 20:59:11 -0500, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > >The only thing I really do differently from a basic asparagus soup is to
    > > >take the tough ends I snapped, cook those down first and run them thru
    > > >the china cap to get an asparagus mash to add back the soup.

    > >
    > > Holy carp, where did you find an affordable China Cap? ?I've wanted
    > > one for decades, but I don't buy it after I look at the price.
    > >

    >
    > What on earth is a China Cap?? Sound like some sort of birthcontrol
    > device...
    >
    > Rosie


    A kitchen tool for straining out a puree:

    http://www.kegworks.com/product.php?productid=172182

    :-)
    --
    Peace! Om

    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
    It's about learning to dance in the rain.
    -- Anon.

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  17. #17
    rosie Guest

    Default Re: Asparagus Soup

    On May 23, 11:16�am, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > In article
    > <9a110eb0-7ec6-4278-9391-1f6406698...@j18g2000yql.googlegroups.com>,
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > �rosie <RMi1013...@aol.com> wrote:
    > > On May 21, 11:51?pm, sf �<s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > > > On Thu, 21 May 2009 20:59:11 -0500, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com>
    > > > wrote:

    >
    > > > >The only thing I really do differently from a basic asparagus soup is to
    > > > >take the tough ends I snapped, cook those down first and run them thru
    > > > >the china cap to get an asparagus mash to add back the soup.

    >
    > > > Holy carp, where did you find an affordable China Cap? ?I've wanted
    > > > one for decades, but I don't buy it after I look at the price.

    >
    > > What on earth is a China Cap?? Sound like some sort of birthcontrol
    > > device...

    >
    > > Rosie

    >
    > A kitchen tool for straining out a puree:
    >
    > http://www.kegworks.com/product.php?productid=172182
    >
    > :-)
    > --
    > Peace! Om
    >
    > Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
    > It's about learning to dance in the rain.
    > -- Anon.
    >
    > recfoodreci...@yahoogroups.com
    > Subscribe: recfoodrecipes-subscr...@yahoogroups.com- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Thank you! never heard of it before!

    Rosie

  18. #18
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Asparagus Soup

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    rosie <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On May 23, 11:16?am, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > > In article
    > > <9a110eb0-7ec6-4278-9391-1f6406698...@j18g2000yql.googlegroups.com>,
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > ?rosie <RMi1013...@aol.com> wrote:
    > > > On May 21, 11:51?pm, sf ?<s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > > > > On Thu, 21 May 2009 20:59:11 -0500, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com>
    > > > > wrote:

    > >
    > > > > >The only thing I really do differently from a basic asparagus soup is
    > > > > >to
    > > > > >take the tough ends I snapped, cook those down first and run them thru
    > > > > >the china cap to get an asparagus mash to add back the soup.

    > >
    > > > > Holy carp, where did you find an affordable China Cap? ?I've wanted
    > > > > one for decades, but I don't buy it after I look at the price.

    > >
    > > > What on earth is a China Cap?? Sound like some sort of birthcontrol
    > > > device...

    > >
    > > > Rosie

    > >
    > > A kitchen tool for straining out a puree:
    > >
    > > http://www.kegworks.com/product.php?productid=172182
    > >

    > Thank you! never heard of it before!
    >
    > Rosie


    Cheers! :-)

    They are especially handy for removing the seeds from cook tomatoes.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
    It's about learning to dance in the rain.
    -- Anon.

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  19. #19
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Asparagus Soup

    On Sat, 23 May 2009 11:14:45 -0500, Omelet <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > blake murphy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Fri, 22 May 2009 12:52:24 -0500, Omelet wrote:
    >>
    >> > In article <[email protected]>,
    >> > sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > <lol> My china cap certainly is not a large one! :-)

    >>
    >> god damn it, every time i see 'china cap' i still think 'dutch cap.'
    >>

    Because the word "cap" doesn't remind him of food, it reminds him of
    headwear.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  20. #20
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Asparagus Soup


    "Omelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    newsmpomelet-0FF071.11144523052009@news-wc.gi[email protected]..
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > blake murphy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Fri, 22 May 2009 12:52:24 -0500, Omelet wrote:
    >>
    >> > In article <[email protected]>,
    >> > sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> On Fri, 22 May 2009 04:17:46 -0700 (PDT), pamjd <[email protected]>
    >> >> wrote:
    >> >>
    >> >>>estate sales usually have china cap with or with out legs if the owner
    >> >>>did any canning unless what I am mistaking what china cap you are
    >> >>>talking about. A new one is usually under $20 at hardware stores
    >> >>>around here.
    >> >>
    >> >> I'm thinking big (capacity in quarts) - a solid piece of metal with
    >> >> lots of holes. If what I've seen was only $20 new, I would have had
    >> >> one a long time ago. We don't have many hardware stores around here.
    >> >> I'll try to find one and see what they have. Hardware stores are
    >> >> always good for basic old fashioned cookware. I've never thought of a
    >> >> china cap as hardware store material before though. I went into high
    >> >> end cooking shops and restaurant supply stores to drool and be scared
    >> >> away by the prices (the last one I looked at was around $100), but in
    >> >> fact - a small one would suit my purposes just fine these days.
    >> >> Thanks!
    >> >
    >> > <lol> My china cap certainly is not a large one! :-)

    >>
    >> god damn it, every time i see 'china cap' i still think 'dutch cap.'
    >>
    >> your pal,
    >> blake

    >
    > Why? :-)
    >
    >

    The Mick should be reminded of his school days when for most of the time he
    sat in the corner facing the wall wearing a DUNCE cap.




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