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Thread: Asian market adventure

  1. #1
    notbob Guest

    Default Asian market adventure

    Finally!

    Talked mom into taking a trip to look at the aspens then made a
    beeline for Colo Sprgs and the Asian Market, one hundred miles away.
    What fun I had!

    Strangely enough, this mkt was bigger than I expected and had much
    more, in some ways, than I anticipated. They had brands and items I'd
    never seen at a doz Asian mkts in the SFBA. OTOH, they seem to lack
    the most common items one would normally expect in a mkt so large and
    had some very strange stock inconsistancies.

    For instance, the largest selection of jarred pickled items I've ever
    seen. But, noodle choice was strangely limited. Out of almost a full
    isle of noodles, only one shrimp flavored noodle was available. Also,
    dried fish in every packaging imaginable. But, despite a huge
    kitchenwares dept, their chopstick selection was pitiful, as was their
    tableware. No slicers like Benriner, either. Other weirdness, plenty
    of miso, but only one brand of instant dashi w/ MSG (ugh). I
    considered making my own, but their dried bonito flakes looked like
    they'd been on the shelf since the Korean War. No Chinese mustard at
    all! How can that be? I bought Japanese mustard. That should be
    interesting. They had a whole line of Lee Kum Kee, but no oyster
    sauce (LKK invented the stuff!!). Only a single gal jug of peanut
    oil, but it was a blend w/ corn and canola added. No wheat based
    springroll wraps. Fresh bean sprouts too pathetic to purchase. A
    smallish fish dept (understandable) but I did buy a gorgeous rack of
    spareribs, dirt cheap. Not a single Smithfield ham in the joint!
    Cheap Chinese bowls were not only NOT cheap, they were prohibitively
    expensive, even the plastic ones. Chinese cooking wine was also near
    non-existent. No fish cakes. A take out counter, but no bbq pork or
    Peking duck ...on Sat! Also, not a trace of your typical Asian store
    stink. It smelled as clean as any Safeway. All the employees spoke
    perfect English. A very unusual store, indeed!

    Regardless, I still went totally insane and bought like a drunken
    sailor given shore leave on payday. Lord knows what I'm gonna do with
    10 lbs of daikon. I'm gonna photograph the dragon fruit before I eat
    it. I bought a lotta jarred sauces I can use later, like LKK and
    non-HuyFong sambals, which I think taste more Mexican than Asian. Got
    a 5lb bag of Thai Jasmine rice. One cereal-size INSULATED stainless
    steel bowel. I've never even HEARD of such a thing, let alone run
    across one. Should work killer for eating ice cream.

    I did score one special prize, Bomy Guava drink in a can. I don't
    usually buy canned Asian drinks, but this stuff is insanely good. I
    used to buy it off the lunch truck when I was going to computer
    school, yet could never find it in ANY of the Asian mkts in SFBA.

    After leaving the mkt, I dropped mom off at a Chinese resto and went
    to this seedy looking hole-in-wall burger joint across the street
    (Cy's). It's been there since 1953! I figured that alone was a good
    endorsement and was not disappointed. Killer burger and shakes.
    After eating, we drove home and arrived jes after dark and pretty much
    drag-assed into the house and went straight to bed. I left everything
    in the car, last night, and will go unpack in a few and rediscover
    what delights I scored on my Asian mkt adventure.

    Potstickers fer dinner!

    nb

  2. #2
    koko Guest

    Default Re: Asian market adventure

    On Sun, 10 Oct 2010 15:00:55 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Finally!
    >
    >Talked mom into taking a trip to look at the aspens then made a
    >beeline for Colo Sprgs and the Asian Market, one hundred miles away.
    >What fun I had!
    >

    snippage of a great adventure

    Sounds like you guys had a great time.
    You did two of my favorite things, taking a little road trip and
    scoping out an Asian market, they are always fun.

    koko
    --

    Food is our common ground, a universal experience
    James Beard

    www.kokoscornerblog.com
    updated 10/04/10
    Watkins natural spices
    www.apinchofspices.com


  3. #3
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Asian market adventure

    On Sun, 10 Oct 2010 15:00:55 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Lord knows what I'm gonna do with 10 lbs of daikon.


    Start with the pickled vegetables for bahn mi.

    > I bought a lotta jarred sauces I can use later, like LKK and
    > non-HuyFong sambals,


    I don't think I've ever eaten anything made with sambal, but I found a
    cowboy bean recipe on that site ChrisD posted that called for pinto
    beans and sambal. Odd combination, but interesting, so I want to try
    it!

    BTW: There's a new Filipino (multi-ethnic) market near me and I found
    a chili paste that's close to what I was looking for. Not quite as
    thick as I wanted, but I bought it anyway and will give it a try.

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  4. #4
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Asian market adventure

    On 2010-10-10, sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Sun, 10 Oct 2010 15:00:55 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Lord knows what I'm gonna do with 10 lbs of daikon.

    >
    > Start with the pickled vegetables for bahn mi.


    Yep! That's what I bought it for, sf. I'm jes now reading that
    blog link you sent me for the banh mi and do chua. I've got all the
    ingredients, but need something to refrigerate them in. I hadda give
    all my Luminarc wire-bail jars to my daughter, now have none. Worse,
    seems they are no longer imported into the US, as the only one's I can
    find are on Euro websites. I used to buy them at Raley's. Grrr....
    I need to hit a hardware store, today, for some canning container
    options so I can start making some do chua.

    nb



  5. #5
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Asian market adventure

    On Sun, 10 Oct 2010 17:09:58 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 2010-10-10, sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > On Sun, 10 Oct 2010 15:00:55 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Lord knows what I'm gonna do with 10 lbs of daikon.

    > >
    > > Start with the pickled vegetables for bahn mi.

    >
    > Yep! That's what I bought it for, sf. I'm jes now reading that
    > blog link you sent me for the banh mi and do chua. I've got all the
    > ingredients, but need something to refrigerate them in. I hadda give
    > all my Luminarc wire-bail jars to my daughter, now have none. Worse,
    > seems they are no longer imported into the US, as the only one's I can
    > find are on Euro websites. I used to buy them at Raley's. Grrr....
    > I need to hit a hardware store, today, for some canning container
    > options so I can start making some do chua.
    >

    Good luck! I guess you can always use regular canning jars and
    transfer the contents over to the one wire bale jar you have at the
    moment. I think I read they have a particular name, not wire bale. I
    bet if you can figure the name part out, you'll have better luck
    finding them on the internet. I have to be on my way to a gathering
    or I'd look for you. Sorry.

    Waving.

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  6. #6
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Asian market adventure

    notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > No Chinese mustard at
    > all! How can that be?


    Probably because "Chinese mustard" seems to be a misnomer, as has been
    discussed before. It appears to be an American phenomenon, so why
    should it be offered in groceries or markets specialising in
    specifically *Asian* foodstuffs?

    > I bought Japanese mustard.


    That is what is sold in all Asian groceries here as well. Japanese
    mustard sold here tends to be very hot indeed and the brands are usually
    the same as wasabi ones.

    Victor


  7. #7
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Asian market adventure

    On 2010-10-10, Victor Sack <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Probably because "Chinese mustard" seems to be a misnomer, as has been
    > discussed before. It appears to be an American phenomenon, so why
    > should it be offered in groceries or markets specialising in
    > specifically *Asian* foodstuffs?


    Ummm... howzabout cuz 99.9% of all Chinese restaurants in the US have
    served one form or another of "Chinese mustard" for the last 2/3rds of
    a century and the store I shopped at is also a major supplier of Colo
    Sprgs Asian restuarants and the fact that most Americans have
    developed a taste for Chinese mustard would seem to dictate a store
    that caters to non-Asians as well as Asian would see fit to stock at
    least one brand of Chinese mustard, be it authentic or not, regardless
    of what inane cultural nonsense you care to toss into the fire.

    But, I could be wrong. The Chinese could be purposely serving 200
    million Americans Chinese mustard in their restaurants, unasked for
    and as a std side, for decades. This, for the sole purpose of
    perpetuating a grand joke on us by then claiming there's actually no
    such thing as Chinese mustard and then reinforcing this hoax by
    refusing to carrying any form of Chinsese mustard in their stores,
    deliberately, jes to alienate and infuriate us.

    Idiot

    nb

  8. #8
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Asian market adventure

    In article <Hykso.18377$if.1819[email protected]>,
    notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > a 5lb bag of Thai Jasmine rice. One cereal-size INSULATED stainless
    > steel bowel. I've never even HEARD of such a thing,


    Me, neither. Who knew!

    > let alone run
    > across one. Should work killer for eating ice cream.


    I'll pass, nb. I don't want ice cream from a steel bowel if it all the
    same to you. "-)

    > nb


    (The debil made me do it.)


    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of Jella
    "Always in a jam, never in a stew; sometimes in a pickle."
    A few pics from the Fair are here:
    http://gallery.me.com/barbschaller#100254

  9. #9
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Asian market adventure

    In article <[email protected]>,
    koko <[email protected]> wrote:

    > You did two of my favorite things, taking a little road trip and
    > scoping out an Asian market, they are always fun.
    >
    > koko


    Yes, they are!

    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    Fondly remember our foray to Ranch 99.

  10. #10
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Asian market adventure

    notbob wrote:
    > Finally!
    >
    > Talked mom into taking a trip to look at the aspens then made a
    > beeline for Colo Sprgs and the Asian Market, one hundred miles away.
    > What fun I had!



    I am not familiar with most of Colo Springs, but there's a very large
    HMart in Aurora/Denver at the corner of Iliff and Parker Rd.

    gloria p

  11. #11
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Asian market adventure

    notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 2010-10-10, Victor Sack <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Probably because "Chinese mustard" seems to be a misnomer, as has been
    > > discussed before. It appears to be an American phenomenon, so why
    > > should it be offered in groceries or markets specialising in
    > > specifically *Asian* foodstuffs?

    >
    > Ummm... howzabout cuz 99.9% of all Chinese restaurants in the US have
    > served one form or another of "Chinese mustard" for the last 2/3rds of
    > a century and the store I shopped at is also a major supplier of Colo
    > Sprgs Asian restuarants and the fact that most Americans have
    > developed a taste for Chinese mustard would seem to dictate a store
    > that caters to non-Asians as well as Asian would see fit to stock at
    > least one brand of Chinese mustard, be it authentic or not, regardless
    > of what inane cultural nonsense you care to toss into the fire.


    What a buffoon!

    The vast majority of Chinese restaurants in America and elsewhere in the
    western world are about as Chinese as "Chinese mustard". If you are
    interested in that kind of food, it serves you right to be disappointed
    by that Asian market. Real Chinese restaurants are usually to be found
    in a relatively few areas with a large enough Chinese population. Don't
    go there.

    > But, I could be wrong. The Chinese could be purposely serving 200
    > million Americans Chinese mustard in their restaurants, unasked for
    > and as a std side, for decades. This, for the sole purpose of
    > perpetuating a grand joke on us by then claiming there's actually no
    > such thing as Chinese mustard and then reinforcing this hoax by
    > refusing to carrying any form of Chinsese mustard in their stores,
    > deliberately, jes to alienate and infuriate us.


    Yes, it is all a grand conspiracy and you have just felt the results.

    > Idiot


    What a miserable, malicious clown!

    I should have known better than to take you seriously enough to follow
    up on your post.

    Victor

  12. #12
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Asian market adventure

    On 2010-10-11, Victor Sack <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I should have known better.....


    Why Vic, you ol' wanker ....you know more/better than EVERYONE! The
    only thing it can possibly be is ....gasp!.... you must be flawed!

    Sorry to hear it, Vic. Try not to cry too loud, though, as I'm busy
    trying very hard to discover what sneaky underhanded ethnic group is
    daily disguising themselves as millions of Chinese people in order to
    own, run, and cook at the hundreds of thousands of bogus Chinese
    restaurants in the US. Boy, wait till the real Chinese people find
    out! They're really gonna be pissed.

    nb

  13. #13
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Asian market adventure

    notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 2010-10-11, Victor Sack <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I should have known better.....

    >
    > Why Vic, you ol' wanker ....you know more/better than EVERYONE!


    *You* would say that about everyone else too. EVERYONE seems superior
    to you.

    > The
    > only thing it can possibly be is ....gasp!.... you must be flawed!
    >
    > Sorry to hear it, Vic. Try not to cry too loud, though, as I'm busy
    > trying very hard to discover what sneaky underhanded ethnic group is
    > daily disguising themselves as millions of Chinese people in order to
    > own, run, and cook at the hundreds of thousands of bogus Chinese
    > restaurants in the US. Boy, wait till the real Chinese people find
    > out! They're really gonna be pissed.


    What is very funny is that you do not even realise that you've been had.
    That is because of your very obvious appalling ignorance about Chinese
    cooking. It is common knowledge to anyone remotely interested in
    Chinese cuisine that American Chinese cooking has little to do with it
    and that the Chinese actually tend to shun it - they cook it for you,
    but prefer to cook something else for themselves. The reason is money.
    People like you will never pay a single cent for a real Chinese meal,
    but will happily pay real money for a meal of generic greasy glop that
    is commonly served in most American and other "western" Chinese
    restaurants.

    You are a buffoon wallowing in your own willful ignorance and you will
    likely forever remain one.

    A couple of links, just to add to the hilarity:
    <http://www.wordiq.com/definition/American_Chinese_cuisine>
    <http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art56033.asp>

    Victor

  14. #14
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Asian market adventure

    On 2010-10-12, Victor Sack <[email protected]> wrote:

    > You are a buffoon......


    ....and you are obviously a self-centered pompous ass with zero sense
    of humor. Go pedal your ravings on someone else who actually gives one
    iota of credence to your egotistical I-know-all nonsense.

    Toodles.....

    nb

  15. #15
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Asian market adventure

    On Tue, 12 Oct 2010 22:35:52 GMT, notbob wrote:

    > On 2010-10-12, Victor Sack <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> You are a buffoon......

    >
    > ...and you are obviously a self-centered pompous ass with zero sense
    > of humor.


    I've been nominating him for that position for years. But OK, I'll
    take a back seat and just second the motion. And I'm volunteering to
    spend full time on the campaign.

    BTW, Vic: The culinary term for the tripe sold in the US is "scalded".
    That is how it's known to all the butchers, meat packers, and
    foodservice industries. I forgot the term at the time and was saying
    it was "parboiled". Either way, tripe is NOT PRECOOKED as we can see
    from the patent documents, and contrary to your claim.

    IBP's Patent on the process:

    http://www.freepatentsonline.com/3846869.html

    Of course Vic will still refuse to accept this and declare that he
    knows better.

    -sw

  16. #16
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Asian market adventure

    On 2010-10-13, Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:


    > I've been nominating him for that position for years. But OK, I'll
    > take a back seat and just second the motion. And I'm volunteering to
    > spend full time on the campaign.


    Strangely, I'm not at all alienated by your support, Steve. Many here
    would think you a questionable, almost dangerous, ally, but I see you
    as a formidable future curmudgeon in training.

    Of course, I'm jes a senile ol' geezer, so what do I know.

    nb


  17. #17
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Asian market adventure

    On Wed, 13 Oct 2010 01:30:35 GMT, notbob wrote:

    > Many here
    > would think you a questionable, almost dangerous, ally, but I see you
    > as a formidable future curmudgeon in training.


    Dude, I'm the cutting edge of curmudgeon. I wrote the textbook!

    -sw

  18. #18
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Asian market adventure

    On Sun, 10 Oct 2010 15:00:55 GMT, notbob wrote:

    > Strangely enough, this mkt was bigger than I expected and had much
    > more, in some ways, than I anticipated. They had brands and items I'd
    > never seen at a doz Asian mkts in the SFBA. OTOH, they seem to lack
    > the most common items one would normally expect in a mkt so large and
    > had some very strange stock inconsistancies.


    This is a strange phenomenon everywhere in the U.S. I grew up on SFBA
    Asian markets and consider them the standard. But when you shop even
    the big Asian markets in other parts of the country, they are
    drastically different.

    Many of the brands in SFBA are imported VIA southern CA companies.
    Anything East of Nevada seems to be NYC importers. And the variances
    on the types of foods are different as well. I've never seen a
    shortage of noodles such as you describe, though. Perhaps that store
    was going out of business or is temporarily short on cash or credit
    and is not stocking up as normal. Therefore, the noodles would be the
    first to be depleted.

    I have never been to NYC itself, but am very interested in exploring
    the Asian food scene and Asian shopping there.

    -sw

  19. #19
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Asian market adventure

    On Tue, 12 Oct 2010 19:25:46 -0700, sf wrote:

    > On Wed, 13 Oct 2010 01:30:35 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On 2010-10-13, Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I've been nominating him for that position for years. But OK, I'll
    >>> take a back seat and just second the motion. And I'm volunteering to
    >>> spend full time on the campaign.

    >>
    >> Strangely, I'm not at all alienated by your support, Steve. Many here
    >> would think you a questionable, almost dangerous, ally, but I see you
    >> as a formidable future curmudgeon in training.
    >>
    >> Of course, I'm jes a senile ol' geezer, so what do I know.
    >>

    > He will never be your equal.


    Is that an insult or a compliment? <shrug>

    -sw

  20. #20
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Asian market adventure

    On 2010-10-13, Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > This is a strange phenomenon everywhere in the U.S. I grew up on SFBA
    > Asian markets and consider them the standard. But when you shop even
    > the big Asian markets in other parts of the country, they are
    > drastically different.
    >
    > Many of the brands in SFBA are imported VIA southern CA companies.
    > Anything East of Nevada seems to be NYC importers. And the variances
    > on the types of foods are different as well. I've never seen a
    > shortage of noodles such as you describe, though. Perhaps that store
    > was going out of business or is temporarily short on cash or credit
    > and is not stocking up as normal. Therefore, the noodles would be the
    > first to be depleted.


    I certainly can't argue any of the points you've made. It's not like
    the store I hit was dying or even lacking, jes weird holes in the SFBA
    model. Typically, in SFBA, I could find a dozen brands/sizes/shapes
    of SHRIMP flavored noodles. This store, no.

    > I have never been to NYC itself, but am very interested in exploring
    > the Asian food scene and Asian shopping there.


    No doubt, intriguing. I'm still dumbfounded by the whole white
    cheddar cheese thing I discovered back in '64 when the family went to
    the NY Worlds Fair.

    nb

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