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Thread: Asian food stores

  1. #1
    z z Guest

    Default Asian food stores

    I have never gone into an Asian food store-what does it look like
    inside? I absolutely love those little sesame seed covered balls with
    the sweet bean filling. Can you buy them ready-made?

    I would like to buy a can of the sweet bean filling and see how it
    differs from our brown sugar baked beans.

    I suggested Ben and Jerry's (on their website) market a vanilla bean ice
    cream with a sweet bean swirl :-)


  2. #2
    ItsJoanNotJoann Guest

    Default Re: Asian food stores

    On Nov 26, 11:33*pm, angie-...@webtv.net (z z) wrote:
    > I have never gone into an Asian food store-what does it look like
    > inside? I absolutely love those little sesame seed covered balls with
    > the sweet bean filling. Can you buy them ready-made?
    >
    > I would like to buy a can of the sweet bean filling and see how it
    > differs from our brown sugar baked beans.
    >
    > I suggested Ben and Jerry's (on their website) market a vanilla bean ice
    > cream with a sweet bean swirl :-)


    >
    >

    You'll never know until you push the door open and walk inside. You
    just might be very shocked and put off by many things you'll see.
    Needless to say, they ain't all the same.

  3. #3
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Asian food stores

    z z wrote:
    >
    > I have never gone into an Asian food store-what does it look like
    > inside? I absolutely love those little sesame seed covered balls with
    > the sweet bean filling. Can you buy them ready-made?


    It's very hot and humid inside, like Asia.
    Nobody speaks English. If you don't speak
    Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese, or Korean,
    they'll politely show you to the door.

    A large store will have a pool where they
    keep the live fish. Point at the fish you
    want, and a young boy will dive in and
    catch it for you. Tip him a quarter for
    each fish, or a dollar if it's a shark.

    In the poultry section, you have to ask
    if you want the bird plucked. That should
    cost an extra $0.35 or so. They will weigh
    the bird before plucking. If you want the
    head and feet removed, you have to ask for
    that too, but there is no extra charge.

    There will usually be a section with an
    armed guard where the shark's fins, dried
    seahorses, and bird's nests are kept. These
    are very expensive items. Do not act
    suspiciously in this area. Do not take
    photographs with your iPhone or anything
    else, or they'll assume you're a reporter
    or environmentalist or something.

    A good store will have an entire aisle devoted
    to ramen. All Asians love ramen, and there
    are hundreds of brands. Prices range from
    about $0.25 for the cheap stuff they sell to
    westerners up to about $25-$35 for a bird's
    nest or shark fin ramen. You actually get a
    much better deal buying the nest or fin
    separately and adding it to a high-quality
    plain ramen (about $5 per package).

    Note that the dried herb and spice section
    will mix culinary herbs with traditional
    Oriental medicine herbs. Some of the latter
    are quite dangerous if used incorrectly.
    Be sure you know what you're buying.

    If you smoke cigarettes, ask for the Chung Hwa
    brand. It'll usually be kept behind a counter.
    It's only about $0.75 a pack. I don't know
    why it's so cheap. They're very harsh, but
    you can get used to them.

    Getting checked out takes a long time because
    they usually use an abacus. Receipts are
    written in Chinese. If you don't understand
    how much to pay, just lay out enough money and
    let them pick out the right amount.

    It's better to park on the street. Don't use
    the parking lot unless you know how to drive
    Chinese style. I don't know how a nation of
    such terrible drivers can be beating us so badly
    in foreign trade. Hope this helps! :-)

  4. #4
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Asian food stores

    ItsJoanNotJoann wrote:
    >
    > You'll never know until you push the door open and walk inside. You
    > just might be very shocked and put off by many things you'll see.


    Oh yes, I forgot to mention the dogs.

  5. #5
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: Asian food stores

    On 11/27/11 12:33 AM, z z wrote:
    > I have never gone into an Asian food store-what does it look like
    > inside? I absolutely love those little sesame seed covered balls with
    > the sweet bean filling. Can you buy them ready-made?


    Yes, I saw some today at my local Asian market

  6. #6
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Asian food stores

    z z wrote:
    > I have never gone into an Asian food store-what does it look like
    > inside? I absolutely love those little sesame seed covered balls with
    > the sweet bean filling. Can you buy them ready-made?
    >
    > I would like to buy a can of the sweet bean filling and see how it
    > differs from our brown sugar baked beans.
    >
    > I suggested Ben and Jerry's (on their website) market a vanilla bean
    > ice cream with a sweet bean swirl :-)


    It depends on what store you go to. Could be a little hole in the wall with
    no produce. Or could be huge like Uwajimaya.

    I don't know about those bean balls so can't help you there.



  7. #7
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Asian food stores

    On Nov 26, 7:33*pm, angie-...@webtv.net (z z) wrote:
    > I have never gone into an Asian food store-what does it look like
    > inside? I absolutely love those little sesame seed covered balls with
    > the sweet bean filling. Can you buy them ready-made?
    >
    > I would like to buy a can of the sweet bean filling and see how it
    > differs from our brown sugar baked beans.
    >
    > I suggested Ben and Jerry's (on their website) market a vanilla bean ice
    > cream with a sweet bean swirl :-)


    I went to an Asian store today and the top floor was Japanese foods.
    It was way cool. I got a shrimp tempura stuck in a ball of rice and
    then wrapped in nori. I also got deep fried balls of sweet potato
    mochi and a Japan style grilled steak. I love Japanese style curry but
    didn't get the Curry Challenge plate which had two styles of curry on
    one plate and you vote which one you like better. I enjoy going to
    Shirokiya in Ala Moana Center.

  8. #8
    pavane Guest

    Default Re: Asian food stores


    "Mark Thorson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >z z wrote:
    >>
    >> I have never gone into an Asian food store-what does it look like
    >> inside? I absolutely love those little sesame seed covered balls with
    >> the sweet bean filling. Can you buy them ready-made?

    >
    > It's very hot and humid inside, like Asia.
    > Nobody speaks English. If you don't speak
    > Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese, or Korean,
    > they'll politely show you to the door.
    >
    > A large store will have a pool where they
    > keep the live fish. Point at the fish you
    > want, and a young boy will dive in and
    > catch it for you. Tip him a quarter for
    > each fish, or a dollar if it's a shark.
    >
    > In the poultry section, you have to ask
    > if you want the bird plucked. That should
    > cost an extra $0.35 or so. They will weigh
    > the bird before plucking. If you want the
    > head and feet removed, you have to ask for
    > that too, but there is no extra charge.
    >
    > There will usually be a section with an
    > armed guard where the shark's fins, dried
    > seahorses, and bird's nests are kept. These
    > are very expensive items. Do not act
    > suspiciously in this area. Do not take
    > photographs with your iPhone or anything
    > else, or they'll assume you're a reporter
    > or environmentalist or something.
    >
    > A good store will have an entire aisle devoted
    > to ramen. All Asians love ramen, and there
    > are hundreds of brands. Prices range from
    > about $0.25 for the cheap stuff they sell to
    > westerners up to about $25-$35 for a bird's
    > nest or shark fin ramen. You actually get a
    > much better deal buying the nest or fin
    > separately and adding it to a high-quality
    > plain ramen (about $5 per package).
    >
    > Note that the dried herb and spice section
    > will mix culinary herbs with traditional
    > Oriental medicine herbs. Some of the latter
    > are quite dangerous if used incorrectly.
    > Be sure you know what you're buying.
    >
    > If you smoke cigarettes, ask for the Chung Hwa
    > brand. It'll usually be kept behind a counter.
    > It's only about $0.75 a pack. I don't know
    > why it's so cheap. They're very harsh, but
    > you can get used to them.
    >
    > Getting checked out takes a long time because
    > they usually use an abacus. Receipts are
    > written in Chinese. If you don't understand
    > how much to pay, just lay out enough money and
    > let them pick out the right amount.
    >
    > It's better to park on the street. Don't use
    > the parking lot unless you know how to drive
    > Chinese style. I don't know how a nation of
    > such terrible drivers can be beating us so badly
    > in foreign trade. Hope this helps! :-)


    Brilliant and indispensable. Thank you.

    pavane



  9. #9
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Asian food stores

    On 2011-11-27, pavane <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Brilliant and indispensable. Thank you.


    Except for the parts about the spice and ramen aisles, it's all total
    horsecrap.

    nb

  10. #10
    meh Guest

    Default Re: Asian food stores

    On 27 Nov 2011 14:37:53 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 2011-11-27, pavane <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Brilliant and indispensable. Thank you.

    >
    >Except for the parts about the spice and ramen aisles, it's all total
    >horsecrap.


    Of COURSE it is, it's Usenet.






  11. #11
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Asian food stores

    On Nov 26, 11:33*pm, angie-...@webtv.net (z z) wrote:
    > I have never gone into an Asian food store-what does it look like
    > inside?


    There is an overpowering smell of fish.

    --Bryan

  12. #12
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Asian food stores

    On 2011-11-27, meh <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Of COURSE it is, it's Usenet.


    So, yer saying one can't be a lying brain dead idiot in a web forum?

    nb

  13. #13
    Christopher M. Guest

    Default Re: Asian food stores

    "Mark Thorson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >z z wrote:
    >>
    >> I have never gone into an Asian food store-what does it look like
    >> inside? I absolutely love those little sesame seed covered balls with
    >> the sweet bean filling. Can you buy them ready-made?

    >
    > It's very hot and humid inside, like Asia.
    > Nobody speaks English. If you don't speak
    > Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese, or Korean,
    > they'll politely show you to the door.
    >
    > A large store will have a pool where they
    > keep the live fish. Point at the fish you
    > want, and a young boy will dive in and
    > catch it for you. Tip him a quarter for
    > each fish, or a dollar if it's a shark.
    >
    > In the poultry section, you have to ask
    > if you want the bird plucked. That should
    > cost an extra $0.35 or so. They will weigh
    > the bird before plucking. If you want the
    > head and feet removed, you have to ask for
    > that too, but there is no extra charge.
    >
    > There will usually be a section with an
    > armed guard where the shark's fins, dried
    > seahorses, and bird's nests are kept. These
    > are very expensive items. Do not act
    > suspiciously in this area. Do not take
    > photographs with your iPhone or anything
    > else, or they'll assume you're a reporter
    > or environmentalist or something.
    >
    > A good store will have an entire aisle devoted
    > to ramen. All Asians love ramen, and there
    > are hundreds of brands. Prices range from
    > about $0.25 for the cheap stuff they sell to
    > westerners up to about $25-$35 for a bird's
    > nest or shark fin ramen. You actually get a
    > much better deal buying the nest or fin
    > separately and adding it to a high-quality
    > plain ramen (about $5 per package).
    >
    > Note that the dried herb and spice section
    > will mix culinary herbs with traditional
    > Oriental medicine herbs. Some of the latter
    > are quite dangerous if used incorrectly.
    > Be sure you know what you're buying.
    >
    > If you smoke cigarettes, ask for the Chung Hwa
    > brand. It'll usually be kept behind a counter.
    > It's only about $0.75 a pack. I don't know
    > why it's so cheap. They're very harsh, but
    > you can get used to them.
    >
    > Getting checked out takes a long time because
    > they usually use an abacus. Receipts are
    > written in Chinese. If you don't understand
    > how much to pay, just lay out enough money and
    > let them pick out the right amount.
    >
    > It's better to park on the street. Don't use
    > the parking lot unless you know how to drive
    > Chinese style. I don't know how a nation of
    > such terrible drivers can be beating us so badly
    > in foreign trade. Hope this helps! :-)


    You are hilarious!


    W. Pooh (AKA Winnie P.)



  14. #14
    Christopher M. Guest

    Default Re: Asian food stores

    "z z" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >I have never gone into an Asian food store-what does it look like
    > inside? I absolutely love those little sesame seed covered balls with
    > the sweet bean filling. Can you buy them ready-made?
    >
    > I would like to buy a can of the sweet bean filling and see how it
    > differs from our brown sugar baked beans.
    >
    > I suggested Ben and Jerry's (on their website) market a vanilla bean ice
    > cream with a sweet bean swirl :-)


    Look at the fruits and vegetables. You'll probably see some amazing fruits
    and vegatables that you've never seen before. If you're tempted to by some
    guava, keep in mind it's a lot of work grinding the guava, and the payoff is
    small.

    Candy is always good. And there's cookes.

    Maybe try a mochi (rice) cake. It's kind of like a giant gummi bear.

    Some Asian people might laugh at you. Don't let this get you down. I
    sometimes wear a Spongeobob Squarepants shirt to encourage laughter.

    You'll probably see some unusual cuts of meat. "Stoma" is the Asian
    abbreviation for "stomach". Check out the pork bellies. That's where bacon
    comes from.

    Check out the pastries if they have some.


    W. Pooh (AKA Winnie P.)



  15. #15
    meh Guest

    Default Re: Asian food stores

    On 27 Nov 2011 15:23:05 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 2011-11-27, meh <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Of COURSE it is, it's Usenet.

    >
    >So, yer saying one can't be a lying brain dead idiot in a web forum?


    Just the OPPOSITE, it is (or SHOULD) be expected.








  16. #16
    Krypsis Guest

    Default Re: Asian food stores

    On 27/11/2011 5:54 PM, Goomba wrote:
    > On 11/27/11 12:33 AM, z z wrote:
    >> I have never gone into an Asian food store-what does it look like
    >> inside? I absolutely love those little sesame seed covered balls with
    >> the sweet bean filling. Can you buy them ready-made?

    >
    > Yes, I saw some today at my local Asian market


    They are just a bit too oily for my liking when bought ready made.

    --

    Krypsis

  17. #17
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Asian food stores

    z z wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > I have never gone into an Asian food store-what does it look like
    > inside? I absolutely love those little sesame seed covered balls with
    > the sweet bean filling. Can you buy them ready-made?
    >
    > I would like to buy a can of the sweet bean filling and see how it
    > differs from our brown sugar baked beans.
    >
    > I suggested Ben and Jerry's (on their website) market a vanilla bean
    > ice cream with a sweet bean swirl :-)


    Lots of things in them. Don't be suprised at the unusual items as you
    will see many regular things as well. Each store will be a bit
    different so I can't know what you will find. In fact, not sure you
    are in the same country I am!

    --


  18. #18
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Asian food stores

    Mark Thorson wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > ItsJoanNotJoann wrote:
    > >
    > > You'll never know until you push the door open and walk inside. You
    > > just might be very shocked and put off by many things you'll see.

    >
    > Oh yes, I forgot to mention the dogs.


    Thats only in markets in Korea.

    --


  19. #19
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Asian food stores

    Mark Thorson wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > z z wrote:


    Mark's attempting to be funny and failing

    > >
    > > I have never gone into an Asian food store-what does it look like
    > > inside? I absolutely love those little sesame seed covered balls
    > > with the sweet bean filling. Can you buy them ready-made?

    >
    > It's very hot and humid inside, like Asia.
    > Nobody speaks English. If you don't speak
    > Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese, or Korean,
    > they'll politely show you to the door.
    >
    > A large store will have a pool where they
    > keep the live fish. Point at the fish you
    > want, and a young boy will dive in and
    > catch it for you. Tip him a quarter for
    > each fish, or a dollar if it's a shark.
    >
    > In the poultry section, you have to ask
    > if you want the bird plucked. That should
    > cost an extra $0.35 or so. They will weigh
    > the bird before plucking. If you want the
    > head and feet removed, you have to ask for
    > that too, but there is no extra charge.
    >
    > There will usually be a section with an
    > armed guard where the shark's fins, dried
    > seahorses, and bird's nests are kept. These
    > are very expensive items. Do not act
    > suspiciously in this area. Do not take
    > photographs with your iPhone or anything
    > else, or they'll assume you're a reporter
    > or environmentalist or something.
    >
    > A good store will have an entire aisle devoted
    > to ramen. All Asians love ramen, and there
    > are hundreds of brands. Prices range from
    > about $0.25 for the cheap stuff they sell to
    > westerners up to about $25-$35 for a bird's
    > nest or shark fin ramen. You actually get a
    > much better deal buying the nest or fin
    > separately and adding it to a high-quality
    > plain ramen (about $5 per package).
    >
    > Note that the dried herb and spice section
    > will mix culinary herbs with traditional
    > Oriental medicine herbs. Some of the latter
    > are quite dangerous if used incorrectly.
    > Be sure you know what you're buying.
    >
    > If you smoke cigarettes, ask for the Chung Hwa
    > brand. It'll usually be kept behind a counter.
    > It's only about $0.75 a pack. I don't know
    > why it's so cheap. They're very harsh, but
    > you can get used to them.
    >
    > Getting checked out takes a long time because
    > they usually use an abacus. Receipts are
    > written in Chinese. If you don't understand
    > how much to pay, just lay out enough money and
    > let them pick out the right amount.
    >
    > It's better to park on the street. Don't use
    > the parking lot unless you know how to drive
    > Chinese style. I don't know how a nation of
    > such terrible drivers can be beating us so badly
    > in foreign trade. Hope this helps! :-)




    --


  20. #20
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Asian food stores

    Krypsis <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 27/11/2011 5:54 PM, Goomba wrote:


    >> On 11/27/11 12:33 AM, z z wrote:


    >>> I have never gone into an Asian food store-what does it look like
    >>> inside? I absolutely love those little sesame seed covered balls with
    >>> the sweet bean filling. Can you buy them ready-made?


    >> Yes, I saw some today at my local Asian market


    >They are just a bit too oily for my liking when bought ready made.


    Weird, such an item should not be oily hardly at all.

    Tangentially, in this context "red bean" is a translation of adzuki
    beans, and "green bean" means soy. The adzuki beans seem to go
    particularly well with a sweet-spicy combination -- I like them with
    a combination of rooster sauce and a little maple syrup.

    But on an overall basis I much prefer new world (common) beans to either
    of these.


    Steve

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