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Thread: asafoetida

  1. #1
    sf Guest

    Default asafoetida


    I hadn't heard of it before this morning (or I didn't remember it),
    and wouldn't you know... I found a recipe that calls for it this
    afternoon. The recipe requires too many other ingredients I don't
    have on hand though. The show is called "Indian Food Made Easy". Ha!
    http://www.cookingchanneltv.com/reci...ipe/index.html

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  2. #2
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: asafoetida

    On 4/3/2011 7:58 PM, Mark Thorson wrote:
    > sf wrote:
    >
    >> I hadn't heard of it before this morning (or I didn't remember it),
    >> and wouldn't you know... I found a recipe that calls for it this
    >> afternoon. The recipe requires too many other ingredients I don't
    >> have on hand though. The show is called "Indian Food Made Easy". Ha!

    >
    > Whole Foods carries it. Dreadful stuff.
    >
    >



    Isn't that what people (in the Middle Ages?) wore in a cloth bag around
    their necks to ward off werewolves or evil spirits? I remember reading
    that it had an awful odor. I have read novels set in the rural south
    where it was called something like "assafidity".

    gloria p

  3. #3
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: asafoetida

    On Apr 3, 6:15*pm, "gloria.p" <gpues...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > On 4/3/2011 7:58 PM, Mark Thorson wrote:
    >
    > > sf wrote:

    >
    > >> I hadn't heard of it before this morning (or I didn't remember it),
    > >> and wouldn't you know... I found a recipe that calls for it this
    > >> afternoon. *The recipe requires too many other ingredients I don't
    > >> have on hand though. *The show is called "Indian Food Made Easy". *Ha!

    >
    > > Whole Foods carries it. *Dreadful stuff.

    >
    > Isn't that what people (in the Middle Ages?) wore in a cloth bag around
    > their necks to ward off werewolves or evil spirits? *I remember reading
    > that it had an awful odor. *I have read novels set in the rural south
    > where it was called something like "assafidity".
    >


    Hing grows above ground.


  4. #4
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: asafoetida

    On Apr 3, 5:57*pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > I hadn't heard of it before this morning (or I didn't remember it),
    > and wouldn't you know... I found a recipe that calls for it this
    > afternoon. *The recipe requires too many other ingredients I don't
    > have on hand though. *The show is called "Indian Food Made Easy". *Ha!http://www.cookingchanneltv.com/reci...gali-butternut...
    >


    Huh. "Panch phoran" is fenugreek, Nigella seed, cumin seed, radhuni
    and fennel seed. We have everything but the radhuni.

  5. #5
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: asafoetida

    sf wrote:

    > I hadn't heard of it before this morning (or I didn't remember it),
    > and wouldn't you know... I found a recipe that calls for it this
    > afternoon. The recipe requires too many other ingredients I don't
    > have on hand though. The show is called "Indian Food Made Easy". Ha!


    Whole Foods carries it. Dreadful stuff.



  6. #6
    sf Guest

    Default Re: asafoetida

    On Sun, 3 Apr 2011 18:26:55 -0700 (PDT), spamtrap1888
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Apr 3, 5:57*pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > > I hadn't heard of it before this morning (or I didn't remember it),
    > > and wouldn't you know... I found a recipe that calls for it this
    > > afternoon. *The recipe requires too many other ingredients I don't
    > > have on hand though. *The show is called "Indian Food Made Easy". *Ha!http://www.cookingchanneltv.com/reci...gali-butternut...
    > >

    >
    > Huh. "Panch phoran" is fenugreek, Nigella seed, cumin seed, radhuni
    > and fennel seed. We have everything but the radhuni.


    I only have fenugreek because of the name, I've never used it - no
    Nigella or radhuni. I have ground cumin, not seed... but I do have
    fennel seed. And nothing to grind anything in, I have no idea what
    happened to that coffee grinder but it sprouted legs and walked off a
    couple of years ago.

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  7. #7
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: asafoetida

    "gloria.p" wrote:

    > Isn't that what people (in the Middle Ages?) wore in a cloth bag around
    > their necks to ward off werewolves or evil spirits? I remember reading
    > that it had an awful odor. I have read novels set in the rural south
    > where it was called something like "assafidity".


    It only emits odor if you cook with it, like putting
    it in a soup or a stew.



  8. #8
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: asafoetida

    On Sun, 03 Apr 2011 19:15:31 -0600, gloria.p wrote:

    > Isn't that what people (in the Middle Ages?) wore in a cloth bag around
    > their necks to ward off werewolves or evil spirits? I remember reading
    > that it had an awful odor. I have read novels set in the rural south
    > where it was called something like "assafidity".


    Rosemary's Baby was set in New York, IIRC. Or was it Chicago? It was
    a fictional herb called "Tanas Root" that was meant to ward off GOOD
    spirits. "Tanas" is an anagram of "Satan".

    Asafoetida would be unknown to the southern U.S. as it's not a native
    plant. But it does come from a root (rhizome).

    -sw

  9. #9
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: asafoetida

    On Sun, 03 Apr 2011 18:26:33 -0800, Mark Thorson wrote:

    > "gloria.p" wrote:
    >
    >> Isn't that what people (in the Middle Ages?) wore in a cloth bag around
    >> their necks to ward off werewolves or evil spirits? I remember reading
    >> that it had an awful odor. I have read novels set in the rural south
    >> where it was called something like "assafidity".

    >
    > It only emits odor if you cook with it, like putting
    > it in a soup or a stew.


    No, it stinks pretty good in it's raw form as well. The odor
    initially gets worse when you cook with it, but then it does off q
    quickly.

    It's a completely useless ingredient unless you're avoiding certain
    superstitious foods and want to improve your aura.

    -sw

  10. #10
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: asafoetida

    Sqwertz wrote:
    > On Sun, 03 Apr 2011 18:26:33 -0800, Mark Thorson wrote:
    >
    >> "gloria.p" wrote:
    >>
    >>> Isn't that what people (in the Middle Ages?) wore in a cloth bag around
    >>> their necks to ward off werewolves or evil spirits? I remember reading
    >>> that it had an awful odor. I have read novels set in the rural south
    >>> where it was called something like "assafidity".

    >> It only emits odor if you cook with it, like putting
    >> it in a soup or a stew.

    >
    > No, it stinks pretty good in it's raw form as well. The odor
    > initially gets worse when you cook with it, but then it does off q
    > quickly.
    >
    > It's a completely useless ingredient unless you're avoiding certain
    > superstitious foods and want to improve your aura.
    >
    > -sw



    Substitute onions. If you want it to taste and smell correct, use
    sprouted half-rotten onions.

    -Bob

  11. #11
    jayshow Guest

    Default Re: asafoetida


    "sf" <[email protected]> ??????[email protected]..
    > On Sun, 3 Apr 2011 18:26:55 -0700 (PDT), spamtrap1888
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Apr 3, 5:57 pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    >> > I hadn't heard of it before this morning (or I didn't remember it),
    >> > and wouldn't you know... I found a recipe that calls for it this
    >> > afternoon. The recipe requires too many other ingredients I don't
    >> > have on hand though. The show is called "Indian Food Made Easy".
    >> > Ha!http://www.cookingchanneltv.com/reci...gali-butternut...
    >> >

    >>
    >> Huh. "Panch phoran" is fenugreek, Nigella seed, cumin seed, radhuni
    >> and fennel seed. We have everything but the radhuni.

    >
    > I only have fenugreek because of the name, I've never used it - no
    > Nigella or radhuni. I have ground cumin, not seed... but I do have
    > fennel seed. And nothing to grind anything in, I have no idea what
    > happened to that coffee grinder but it sprouted legs and walked off a
    > couple of years ago.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.



    it looks nice,i am a chinese people ,but i like it~



  12. #12
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: asafoetida

    On Apr 3, 7:33*pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    > On Sun, 03 Apr 2011 19:15:31 -0600, gloria.p wrote:
    > > Isn't that what people (in the Middle Ages?) wore in a cloth bag around
    > > their necks to ward off werewolves or evil spirits? *I remember reading
    > > that it had an awful odor. *I have read novels set in the rural south
    > > where it was called something like "assafidity".

    >
    > Rosemary's Baby was set in New York, IIRC. *Or was it Chicago? *It was
    > a fictional herb called "Tanas Root" that was meant to ward off GOOD
    > spirits. *"Tanas" is an anagram of "Satan".
    >
    > Asafoetida would be unknown to the southern U.S. as it's not a native
    > plant. *But it does come from a root (rhizome).
    >


    Then why do Jains eat it?

  13. #13
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: asafoetida

    Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"gloria.p" wrote:


    >> Isn't that what people (in the Middle Ages?) wore in a cloth bag around
    >> their necks to ward off werewolves or evil spirits? I remember reading
    >> that it had an awful odor. I have read novels set in the rural south
    >> where it was called something like "assafidity".


    >It only emits odor if you cook with it, like putting
    >it in a soup or a stew.


    It contains "foetid". Remember that.

    Essential for saag paneer, don't know that you want to use it
    in anything else.

    Steve

  14. #14
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: asafoetida


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > I hadn't heard of it before this morning (or I didn't remember it),
    > and wouldn't you know... I found a recipe that calls for it this
    > afternoon. The recipe requires too many other ingredients I don't
    > have on hand though. The show is called "Indian Food Made Easy". Ha!
    > http://www.cookingchanneltv.com/reci...ipe/index.html
    >
    > --



    I seem to remember that was a remedy for consumption back around 1900. Hang
    an asafoetida bag around your neck.

    Jill


  15. #15
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: asafoetida

    On 4/4/2011 4:00 AM, Steve Pope wrote:
    > Mark Thorson<[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> "gloria.p" wrote:

    >
    >>> Isn't that what people (in the Middle Ages?) wore in a cloth bag around
    >>> their necks to ward off werewolves or evil spirits? I remember reading
    >>> that it had an awful odor. I have read novels set in the rural south
    >>> where it was called something like "assafidity".

    >
    >> It only emits odor if you cook with it, like putting
    >> it in a soup or a stew.

    >
    > It contains "foetid". Remember that.
    >
    > Essential for saag paneer, don't know that you want to use it
    > in anything else.
    >
    > Steve


    I believe certain groups of strict Hindus (like Hari Krishnas) don't use
    onions or garlic because they are *associated* with meat cooking and try
    to replace them with hing. On the other hand, prepared garam masala
    often contains the stuff but the end result in cooking is quite good
    even if the odor is pretty disgusting when you stir it in. The general
    reaction of non-Indians to hing is discussed by Gernot Katzer:
    http://www.uni-graz.at/~katzer/engl/index.html. I will just give a few
    names to illustrate the nearly uniform western reaction to asafoetida:
    devil's dung, merde du diable and Teufelsdreck.

    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    I'm "not"
    [email protected]

  16. #16
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: asafoetida

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...
    >
    > "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > >
    > > I hadn't heard of it before this morning (or I didn't remember it),
    > > and wouldn't you know... I found a recipe that calls for it this
    > > afternoon. The recipe requires too many other ingredients I don't
    > > have on hand though. The show is called "Indian Food Made Easy". Ha!
    > > http://www.cookingchanneltv.com/reci...ipe/index.html
    > >
    > > --

    >
    >
    > I seem to remember that was a remedy for consumption back around 1900. Hang
    > an asafoetida bag around your neck.
    >
    > Jill


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asafoetida

    is well worth a read

    Janet

  17. #17
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: asafoetida


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > I hadn't heard of it before this morning (or I didn't remember it),
    > and wouldn't you know... I found a recipe that calls for it this
    > afternoon. The recipe requires too many other ingredients I don't
    > have on hand though. The show is called "Indian Food Made Easy". Ha!
    > http://www.cookingchanneltv.com/reci...ipe/index.html

    `

    You can buy it online or in Indian markets. It has a kind of garlic/onion
    taste. Be really, really careful with it as just a tiny bit too much will
    ruin the dish. That's kind of true with Indian food in general. Hard to
    get the balance just right. It's the one cuisine I gave up on. I was never
    very impressed with my results. My many attempts at palak paneer never
    matched what I ate in Indian restaurants. Saag aloo, vindaloo, saag
    paneer - same. I just buy jarred tadkas now.

    Paul



  18. #18
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: asafoetida

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Janet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asafoetida
    >
    > is well worth a read
    >
    > Janet


    Yes it was, thanks!
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinlien

  19. #19
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: asafoetida

    "jmcquown" wrote:
    >"sf" wrote:
    >>
    >> I hadn't heard of it before this morning (or I didn't remember it),
    >> and wouldn't you know... I found a recipe that calls for it this
    >> afternoon. The recipe requires too many other ingredients I don't
    >> have on hand though. The show is called "Indian Food Made Easy". Ha!
    >> http://www.cookingchanneltv.com/reci...ipe/index.html

    >
    >I seem to remember that was a remedy for consumption back around 1900.
    >Hang an asafoetida bag around your neck.


    Stank, eh... now we can thank the Indians for the term douchebag. hehe
    http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/boos...etida-bag.html



  20. #20
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: asafoetida

    On 2011-04-04, Omelet <[email protected]> wrote:
    > In article <MPG.2803da2cd3[email protected]>,
    > Janet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asafoetida
    >>
    >> is well worth a read
    >>
    >> Janet

    >
    > Yes it was, thanks!


    Couple more fun factoids:

    In Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey/Maturin series (Master and Commander), Dr
    Maturin always keeps a stock of asafoetida on hand to add to oral
    boluses. It was added specifically to make them taste bad, as it was
    the universal belief amongst common sailors that a medicine that
    didn't taste horrible couldn't be of any real value.

    My own experience confirms jes how strong asafoetida can really smell.
    When entering an unfamiliar Indian grocery store in Berkeley, CA, the
    stink was overwhelming and completely permeated that rather spacious
    store. Got to chatting with the proprietor and learned they had jes
    taken delivery of a fresh new shipment of asafoetida (hing). She told
    me the previous owner had actually stored it out behind the store in a
    cabinet next to the gas meter, but she didn't mind it. The new
    shipment was a buncha small sealed (not too well) plastic containers
    totaling an amount about half the size of a shoebox, yet the fragrance
    was so powerful it literally assaulted one's olfactory the second the
    front door was opened. Some serious stink!

    nb

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