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Thread: Applesauce

  1. #1
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Applesauce

    Earlier in the week I drove by the house at the end of the street which
    has been empty and in foreclosure for more than a month. I noticed
    that there was an apple tree absolutely groaning under unpicked fruit.

    Yesterday afternoon I walked over with a basket, tasted one of the
    apples, and filled the basket. They weren't perfect, many had worm
    holes or bruises where they were resting against a branch. The original
    owner took good care of the yard, recent ones have not.

    Got home and began to chop, cutting out any signs of damage. Put the
    cut fruit in two large kettles with a little water and began to simmer.
    As I checked the process I was surprised to see how little the apples
    were softening or cooking down. Must be a variety more suited to eating
    out of hand or making pie.

    These apples were greenish, some slightly yellow, some with a red blush.
    They are very crisp, sweet with some tartness. I am thinking perhaps
    Golden Delicious? It took a couple of hours on very low heat to get
    them ready to strain.

    Went to the garage cabinet to find late Mother-in-law's china cap
    strainer and found, also...tadaaaa! An All-Clad food mill I had found
    in the sale aisle at TJMaxx for $19.99 about 18 months ago, original
    price $119. No box, no instructions, but in perfect condition.

    Once I figured out I had the screen in upside down and corrected it, it
    went well and quickly. It produced 4 full pints of applesauce. The
    flavor is OK, quite sweet but lacking a bit of tartness that would have
    made it wonderful. Worth the effort.

    gloria p

  2. #2
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Applesauce

    Gloria P wrote:
    > Earlier in the week I drove by the house at the end of the street
    > which has been empty and in foreclosure for more than a month. I
    > noticed that there was an apple tree absolutely groaning under
    > unpicked fruit.
    > Yesterday afternoon I walked over with a basket, tasted one of the
    > apples, and filled the basket. They weren't perfect, many had worm
    > holes or bruises where they were resting against a branch. The
    > original owner took good care of the yard, recent ones have not.
    >
    > Got home and began to chop, cutting out any signs of damage. Put the
    > cut fruit in two large kettles with a little water and began to
    > simmer. As I checked the process I was surprised to see how little
    > the apples were softening or cooking down. Must be a variety more
    > suited to eating out of hand or making pie.
    >
    > These apples were greenish, some slightly yellow, some with a red
    > blush. They are very crisp, sweet with some tartness. I am thinking
    > perhaps Golden Delicious? It took a couple of hours on very low heat
    > to get them ready to strain.
    >
    > Went to the garage cabinet to find late Mother-in-law's china cap
    > strainer and found, also...tadaaaa! An All-Clad food mill I had found
    > in the sale aisle at TJMaxx for $19.99 about 18 months ago, original
    > price $119. No box, no instructions, but in perfect condition.
    >
    > Once I figured out I had the screen in upside down and corrected it,
    > it went well and quickly. It produced 4 full pints of applesauce. The
    > flavor is OK, quite sweet but lacking a bit of tartness that
    > would have made it wonderful. Worth the effort.


    reeeeeeeesult)))



  3. #3
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: Applesauce

    On Sep 28, 11:43*am, Gloria P <gpues...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > Earlier in the week I drove by the house at the end of the street which
    > * has been empty and in foreclosure for more than a month. *I noticed
    > that there was an apple tree absolutely groaning under unpicked fruit.
    >
    > Yesterday afternoon I walked over with a basket, tasted one of the
    > apples, and filled the basket. *They weren't perfect, many had worm
    > holes or bruises where they were resting against a branch. *The original
    > owner took good care of the yard, recent ones have not.
    >
    > Got home and began to chop, cutting out any signs of damage. *Put the
    > cut fruit in two large kettles with a little water and began to simmer.
    > As I checked the process I was surprised to see how little the apples
    > were softening or cooking down. *Must be a variety more suited to eating
    > out of hand or making pie.
    >
    > These apples were greenish, some slightly yellow, some with a red blush.
    > They are very crisp, sweet with some tartness. *I am thinking perhaps
    > Golden Delicious? *It took a couple of hours on very low heat to get
    > them ready to strain.
    >
    > Went to the garage cabinet to find late Mother-in-law's china cap
    > strainer and found, also...tadaaaa! *An All-Clad food mill I had found
    > in the sale aisle at TJMaxx for $19.99 about 18 months ago, original
    > price $119. *No box, no instructions, but in perfect condition.
    >
    > Once I figured out I had the screen in upside down and corrected it, it
    > went well and quickly. *It produced 4 full pints of applesauce. *The
    > flavor is OK, quite sweet but lacking a bit of tartness that would have
    > made it wonderful. *Worth the effort.
    >
    > gloria p


    Good job. Where will you store it all? Just in jars? In the
    fridge? I wonder how it would be after freezing?
    Pardon thehe dumb questions.

  4. #4
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Applesauce



    ..
    "Gloria P" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Earlier in the week I drove by the house at the end of the street which
    > has been empty and in foreclosure for more than a month. I noticed that
    > there was an apple tree absolutely groaning under unpicked fruit.
    >
    > Yesterday afternoon I walked over with a basket, tasted one of the apples,
    > and filled the basket. They weren't perfect, many had worm holes or
    > bruises where they were resting against a branch. The original owner took
    > good care of the yard, recent ones have not.
    >
    > Got home and began to chop, cutting out any signs of damage. Put the cut
    > fruit in two large kettles with a little water and began to simmer.
    > As I checked the process I was surprised to see how little the apples were
    > softening or cooking down. Must be a variety more suited to eating out of
    > hand or making pie.
    >
    > These apples were greenish, some slightly yellow, some with a red blush.
    > They are very crisp, sweet with some tartness. I am thinking perhaps
    > Golden Delicious? It took a couple of hours on very low heat to get them
    > ready to strain.
    >
    > Went to the garage cabinet to find late Mother-in-law's china cap strainer
    > and found, also...tadaaaa! An All-Clad food mill I had found
    > in the sale aisle at TJMaxx for $19.99 about 18 months ago, original price
    > $119. No box, no instructions, but in perfect condition.
    >
    > Once I figured out I had the screen in upside down and corrected it, it
    > went well and quickly. It produced 4 full pints of applesauce. The
    > flavor is OK, quite sweet but lacking a bit of tartness that would have
    > made it wonderful. Worth the effort.
    >
    > gloria p


    When I was a kid - a lot of years ago there was a similar situation in
    Bayville, Long Island NY. I remember my Grandfather bring several baskets
    of apples from trees on some closed/abandon properties.

    I remember both grandparents pealing and coring apple after apple then
    boiling and straining the cores and peals then using that liquid as the
    base for the most wonderful Apple Butter. I can still remember the taste
    and color of this wonderful stuff...

    Toast with butter & apple butter YUM...

    --
    Dimitri
    Coming soon:
    http://kitchenguide.wordpress.com




  5. #5
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Applesauce

    Kalmia wrote:
    > On Sep 28, 11:43 am, Gloria P <gpues...@comcast.net> wrote:
    >> Earlier in the week I drove by the house at the end of the street which
    >> has been empty and in foreclosure for more than a month. I noticed
    >> that there was an apple tree absolutely groaning under unpicked fruit.
    >>
    >> Yesterday afternoon I walked over with a basket, tasted one of the
    >> apples, and filled the basket. They weren't perfect, many had worm
    >> holes or bruises where they were resting against a branch. The original
    >> owner took good care of the yard, recent ones have not.
    >>
    >> Got home and began to chop, cutting out any signs of damage. Put the
    >> cut fruit in two large kettles with a little water and began to simmer.
    >> As I checked the process I was surprised to see how little the apples
    >> were softening or cooking down. Must be a variety more suited to eating
    >> out of hand or making pie.
    >>
    >> These apples were greenish, some slightly yellow, some with a red blush.
    >> They are very crisp, sweet with some tartness. I am thinking perhaps
    >> Golden Delicious? It took a couple of hours on very low heat to get
    >> them ready to strain.
    >>
    >> Went to the garage cabinet to find late Mother-in-law's china cap
    >> strainer and found, also...tadaaaa! An All-Clad food mill I had found
    >> in the sale aisle at TJMaxx for $19.99 about 18 months ago, original
    >> price $119. No box, no instructions, but in perfect condition.
    >>
    >> Once I figured out I had the screen in upside down and corrected it, it
    >> went well and quickly. It produced 4 full pints of applesauce. The
    >> flavor is OK, quite sweet but lacking a bit of tartness that would have
    >> made it wonderful. Worth the effort.
    >>
    >> gloria p

    >
    > Good job. Where will you store it all? Just in jars? In the
    > fridge? I wonder how it would be after freezing?
    > Pardon thehe dumb questions.



    Applesauce freezes very well. I have a 20 pound bag of Harelson apples
    (2nds that I bought real cheap at the orchard) on the passenger seat of
    my truck* and I'm not going to be able to eat that many fresh, so I see
    applesauce in my near future. (Usually I wait for the Honeygold apples
    for making sauce)

    If the apples aren't tart enough, you can add a little lemon juice to
    help brighten the sauce. A little cider vinegar might work even better
    if you are careful not to add too much.

    Maybe this winter I'll finish building that cider press that I started,
    so I'll be ready for next fall. I keep saying that to myself every year
    about this time.

    *If I bring the whole huge bag in the house, my wife may hurt herself
    rolling her eyes, so I just bring them in just a few at a time as a
    kindness to her <g>

    Bob

  6. #6
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Applesauce

    Dimitri said...

    >
    >
    > .
    > "Gloria P" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> Earlier in the week I drove by the house at the end of the street which
    >> has been empty and in foreclosure for more than a month. I noticed
    >> that there was an apple tree absolutely groaning under unpicked fruit.
    >>
    >> Yesterday afternoon I walked over with a basket, tasted one of the
    >> apples, and filled the basket. They weren't perfect, many had worm
    >> holes or bruises where they were resting against a branch. The
    >> original owner took good care of the yard, recent ones have not.
    >>
    >> Got home and began to chop, cutting out any signs of damage. Put the
    >> cut fruit in two large kettles with a little water and began to simmer.
    >> As I checked the process I was surprised to see how little the apples
    >> were softening or cooking down. Must be a variety more suited to
    >> eating out of hand or making pie.
    >>
    >> These apples were greenish, some slightly yellow, some with a red
    >> blush. They are very crisp, sweet with some tartness. I am thinking
    >> perhaps Golden Delicious? It took a couple of hours on very low heat
    >> to get them ready to strain.
    >>
    >> Went to the garage cabinet to find late Mother-in-law's china cap
    >> strainer and found, also...tadaaaa! An All-Clad food mill I had found
    >> in the sale aisle at TJMaxx for $19.99 about 18 months ago, original
    >> price $119. No box, no instructions, but in perfect condition.
    >>
    >> Once I figured out I had the screen in upside down and corrected it, it
    >> went well and quickly. It produced 4 full pints of applesauce. The
    >> flavor is OK, quite sweet but lacking a bit of tartness that would have
    >> made it wonderful. Worth the effort.
    >>
    >> gloria p

    >
    > When I was a kid - a lot of years ago there was a similar situation in
    > Bayville, Long Island NY. I remember my Grandfather bring several
    > baskets of apples from trees on some closed/abandon properties.
    >
    > I remember both grandparents pealing and coring apple after apple then
    > boiling and straining the cores and peals then using that liquid as the
    > base for the most wonderful Apple Butter. I can still remember the
    > taste and color of this wonderful stuff...
    >
    > Toast with butter & apple butter YUM...



    As kids at the farm in summer in New Hope, PA, we'd climb up and relax in
    the apple trees and munch them to our hearts content and toss the cores at
    the cows lazing in the field across the fence. I can't recall the kitchen
    making any use of them.

    Andy

  7. #7
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Applesauce

    zxcvbob wrote:
    > Kalmia wrote:
    >> On Sep 28, 11:43 am, Gloria P <gpues...@comcast.net> wrote:
    >>> Earlier in the week I drove by the house at the end of the street
    >>> which has been empty and in foreclosure for more than a month. I
    >>> noticed that there was an apple tree absolutely groaning under
    >>> unpicked fruit. Yesterday afternoon I walked over with a basket, tasted
    >>> one of the
    >>> apples, and filled the basket. They weren't perfect, many had worm
    >>> holes or bruises where they were resting against a branch. The
    >>> original owner took good care of the yard, recent ones have not.
    >>>
    >>> Got home and began to chop, cutting out any signs of damage. Put
    >>> the cut fruit in two large kettles with a little water and began to
    >>> simmer. As I checked the process I was surprised to see how little
    >>> the apples were softening or cooking down. Must be a variety more
    >>> suited to eating out of hand or making pie.
    >>>
    >>> These apples were greenish, some slightly yellow, some with a red
    >>> blush. They are very crisp, sweet with some tartness. I am
    >>> thinking perhaps Golden Delicious? It took a couple of hours on
    >>> very low heat to get them ready to strain.
    >>>
    >>> Went to the garage cabinet to find late Mother-in-law's china cap
    >>> strainer and found, also...tadaaaa! An All-Clad food mill I had
    >>> found in the sale aisle at TJMaxx for $19.99 about 18 months ago,
    >>> original price $119. No box, no instructions, but in perfect
    >>> condition. Once I figured out I had the screen in upside down and
    >>> corrected
    >>> it, it went well and quickly. It produced 4 full pints of
    >>> applesauce. The flavor is OK, quite sweet but lacking a bit of
    >>> tartness that would have made it wonderful. Worth the effort.
    >>>
    >>> gloria p

    >>
    >> Good job. Where will you store it all? Just in jars? In the
    >> fridge? I wonder how it would be after freezing?
    >> Pardon thehe dumb questions.

    >
    >
    > Applesauce freezes very well. I have a 20 pound bag of Harelson
    > apples (2nds that I bought real cheap at the orchard) on the
    > passenger seat of my truck* and I'm not going to be able to eat that
    > many fresh, so I see applesauce in my near future. (Usually I wait
    > for the Honeygold apples for making sauce)
    >
    > If the apples aren't tart enough, you can add a little lemon juice to
    > help brighten the sauce. A little cider vinegar might work even
    > better if you are careful not to add too much.
    >
    > Maybe this winter I'll finish building that cider press that I
    > started, so I'll be ready for next fall. I keep saying that to
    > myself every year about this time.
    >
    > *If I bring the whole huge bag in the house, my wife may hurt herself
    > rolling her eyes, so I just bring them in just a few at a time as a
    > kindness to her <g>


    lol



  8. #8
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default Re: Applesauce

    Gloria P wrote:

    > Earlier in the week I drove by the house at the end of the street
    > which has been empty and in foreclosure for more than a month. I
    > noticed that there was an apple tree absolutely groaning under
    > unpicked fruit.
    >
    > Yesterday afternoon I walked over with a basket, tasted one of the
    > apples, and filled the basket. They weren't perfect, many had worm
    > holes or bruises where they were resting against a branch. The
    > original owner took good care of the yard, recent ones have not.
    >
    > Got home and began to chop, cutting out any signs of damage.


    <snipped for space>

    > It produced 4 full pints of applesauce. The flavor is OK, quite
    > sweet but lacking a bit of tartness that would have made it wonderful.
    > Worth the effort.


    Sounds like you put them apples to good use. Clever girl, says I ;-)

    BTW, maybe you could add a lee-tle bit of lemon juice before consuming?
    Might give it the tartness you'd like?
    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy

  9. #9
    George Guest

    Default Re: Applesauce

    Gloria P wrote:
    > Earlier in the week I drove by the house at the end of the street which
    > has been empty and in foreclosure for more than a month. I noticed
    > that there was an apple tree absolutely groaning under unpicked fruit.
    >
    > Yesterday afternoon I walked over with a basket, tasted one of the
    > apples, and filled the basket. They weren't perfect, many had worm
    > holes or bruises where they were resting against a branch. The original
    > owner took good care of the yard, recent ones have not.
    >
    > Got home and began to chop, cutting out any signs of damage. Put the
    > cut fruit in two large kettles with a little water and began to simmer.
    > As I checked the process I was surprised to see how little the apples
    > were softening or cooking down. Must be a variety more suited to eating
    > out of hand or making pie.
    >
    > These apples were greenish, some slightly yellow, some with a red blush.
    > They are very crisp, sweet with some tartness. I am thinking perhaps
    > Golden Delicious? It took a couple of hours on very low heat to get
    > them ready to strain.
    >
    > Went to the garage cabinet to find late Mother-in-law's china cap
    > strainer and found, also...tadaaaa! An All-Clad food mill I had found
    > in the sale aisle at TJMaxx for $19.99 about 18 months ago, original
    > price $119. No box, no instructions, but in perfect condition.
    >
    > Once I figured out I had the screen in upside down and corrected it, it
    > went well and quickly. It produced 4 full pints of applesauce. The
    > flavor is OK, quite sweet but lacking a bit of tartness that would have
    > made it wonderful. Worth the effort.
    >
    > gloria p


    I do the same. An older couple lived behind us and there is an apple
    tree at the rear of their property. The house has been vacant for some
    time since they died. They weren't interested in the apples when they
    were alive when I asked about them. They are medium sized and misshapen
    but make the greatest apple sauce.

  10. #10
    Dora Guest

    Default Re: Applesauce

    Dimitri wrote:
    > When I was a kid - a lot of years ago there was a similar situation
    > in
    > Bayville, Long Island NY. I remember my Grandfather bring several
    > baskets of apples from trees on some closed/abandon properties.
    >
    > I remember both grandparents pealing and coring apple after apple
    > then
    > boiling and straining the cores and peals then using that liquid as
    > the base for the most wonderful Apple Butter. I can still remember
    > the taste and color of this wonderful stuff...
    >
    > Toast with butter & apple butter YUM...


    A couple of years ago we visited a "twice removed" (whatever that is)
    cousin of my husband's. They are country folk - she had 80 (yes
    eighty!) quarts of applesauce sitting on her dining room table, ready
    to take to the church to sell, which she and her husband had just "put
    up" (is that a country term?). I'm still mind-boggled.


  11. #11
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Applesauce

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Gloria P <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Earlier in the week I drove by the house at the end of the street which
    > has been empty and in foreclosure for more than a month. I noticed
    > that there was an apple tree absolutely groaning under unpicked fruit.
    >
    > Yesterday afternoon I walked over with a basket, tasted one of the
    > apples, and filled the basket. They weren't perfect, many had worm
    > holes or bruises where they were resting against a branch. The original
    > owner took good care of the yard, recent ones have not.
    >
    > Got home and began to chop, cutting out any signs of damage. Put the
    > cut fruit in two large kettles with a little water and began to simmer.
    > As I checked the process I was surprised to see how little the apples
    > were softening or cooking down. Must be a variety more suited to eating
    > out of hand or making pie.
    >
    > These apples were greenish, some slightly yellow, some with a red blush.
    > They are very crisp, sweet with some tartness. I am thinking perhaps
    > Golden Delicious? It took a couple of hours on very low heat to get
    > them ready to strain.
    >
    > Went to the garage cabinet to find late Mother-in-law's china cap
    > strainer and found, also...tadaaaa! An All-Clad food mill I had found
    > in the sale aisle at TJMaxx for $19.99 about 18 months ago, original
    > price $119. No box, no instructions, but in perfect condition.
    >
    > Once I figured out I had the screen in upside down and corrected it, it
    > went well and quickly. It produced 4 full pints of applesauce. The
    > flavor is OK, quite sweet but lacking a bit of tartness that would have
    > made it wonderful. Worth the effort.
    >
    > gloria p


    Sounds like a wonderful find. :-)

    A little lemon juice could have added the tartness you wanted?

    I just recently bought a food mill, but have not used it yet...
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  12. #12
    Gregory Morrow Guest

    Default Re: Applesauce

    Ophelia wrote:

    > Gloria P wrote:
    >> Earlier in the week I drove by the house at the end of the street
    >> which has been empty and in foreclosure for more than a month. I
    >> noticed that there was an apple tree absolutely groaning under
    >> unpicked fruit.
    >> Yesterday afternoon I walked over with a basket, tasted one of the
    >> apples, and filled the basket. They weren't perfect, many had worm
    >> holes or bruises where they were resting against a branch. The
    >> original owner took good care of the yard, recent ones have not.
    >>
    >> Got home and began to chop, cutting out any signs of damage. Put the
    >> cut fruit in two large kettles with a little water and began to
    >> simmer. As I checked the process I was surprised to see how little
    >> the apples were softening or cooking down. Must be a variety more
    >> suited to eating out of hand or making pie.
    >>
    >> These apples were greenish, some slightly yellow, some with a red
    >> blush. They are very crisp, sweet with some tartness. I am thinking
    >> perhaps Golden Delicious? It took a couple of hours on very low heat
    >> to get them ready to strain.
    >>
    >> Went to the garage cabinet to find late Mother-in-law's china cap
    >> strainer and found, also...tadaaaa! An All-Clad food mill I had
    >> found in the sale aisle at TJMaxx for $19.99 about 18 months ago,
    >> original price $119. No box, no instructions, but in perfect
    >> condition.
    >>
    >> Once I figured out I had the screen in upside down and corrected it,
    >> it went well and quickly. It produced 4 full pints of applesauce.
    >> The flavor is OK, quite sweet but lacking a bit of tartness that
    >> would have made it wonderful. Worth the effort.

    >
    > reeeeeeeesult)))



    These crisp autumn days have me thinking of apples, Ms. O...

    Last week I did a pork loin on the bbq grill, basted with a cider and
    mustard "sauce" I cooked up - YUM...!!! I used the same sauce on some
    chicken I was doing, it was fantastic...

    I simply reduced some cider, added some stone-ground mustard and some
    spices, and it turned out pretty good. A nice change from the same old bbq
    tomato - based bbq sauces...


    --
    Best
    Greg



  13. #13
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Applesauce

    Gregory Morrow wrote:
    > These crisp autumn days have me thinking of apples, Ms. O...
    >
    > Last week I did a pork loin on the bbq grill, basted with a cider and
    > mustard "sauce" I cooked up - YUM...!!! I used the same sauce on some
    > chicken I was doing, it was fantastic...
    >
    > I simply reduced some cider, added some stone-ground mustard and some
    > spices, and it turned out pretty good. A nice change from the same
    > old bbq tomato - based bbq sauces...


    We don't have a bbq grill and I usually roast my pork loin in the oven. but
    that sauce sounds wonderful and I will be trying it)

    Could you be more specific about the mustard please? Dry cider?



  14. #14
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Applesauce


    Gloria P" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Earlier in the week I drove by the house at the end of the street which
    > has been empty and in foreclosure for more than a month. I noticed that
    > there was an apple tree absolutely groaning under unpicked fruit.
    >
    > Yesterday afternoon I walked over with a basket, tasted one of the apples,
    > and filled the basket. They weren't perfect, many had worm holes or
    > bruises where they were resting against a branch. The original owner took
    > good care of the yard, recent ones have not.
    >
    > Got home and began to chop, cutting out any signs of damage. Put the cut
    > fruit in two large kettles with a little water and began to simmer.
    > As I checked the process I was surprised to see how little the apples were
    > softening or cooking down. Must be a variety more suited to eating out of
    > hand or making pie.
    >
    > These apples were greenish, some slightly yellow, some with a red blush.
    > They are very crisp, sweet with some tartness. I am thinking perhaps
    > Golden Delicious? It took a couple of hours on very low heat to get them
    > ready to strain.
    >
    > Went to the garage cabinet to find late Mother-in-law's china cap strainer
    > and found, also...tadaaaa! An All-Clad food mill I had found
    > in the sale aisle at TJMaxx for $19.99 about 18 months ago, original price
    > $119. No box, no instructions, but in perfect condition.
    >
    > Once I figured out I had the screen in upside down and corrected it, it
    > went well and quickly. It produced 4 full pints of applesauce. The
    > flavor is OK, quite sweet but lacking a bit of tartness that would have
    > made it wonderful. Worth the effort.
    >
    > gloria p


    Mmmmmm Apple sauce & pork chops..

    --
    Dimitri
    Coming soon:
    http://kitchenguide.wordpress.com.
    "


  15. #15
    Default User Guest

    Default Re: Applesauce

    Gloria P wrote:

    > Once I figured out I had the screen in upside down and corrected it,
    > it went well and quickly. It produced 4 full pints of applesauce.
    > The flavor is OK, quite sweet but lacking a bit of tartness that
    > would have made it wonderful. Worth the effort.


    Apple butter is quite nice too. If you pick more apples, think about it.



    Brian

    --
    Day 238 of the "no grouchy usenet posts" project

  16. #16
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Applesauce

    On Mon, 28 Sep 2009 09:56:28 -0700, "Dimitri" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >Gloria P" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]..
    >> Earlier in the week I drove by the house at the end of the street which
    >> has been empty and in foreclosure for more than a month. I noticed that
    >> there was an apple tree absolutely groaning under unpicked fruit.
    >>
    >> Yesterday afternoon I walked over with a basket, tasted one of the apples,
    >> and filled the basket. They weren't perfect, many had worm holes or
    >> bruises where they were resting against a branch. The original owner took
    >> good care of the yard, recent ones have not.
    >>
    >> Got home and began to chop, cutting out any signs of damage. Put the cut
    >> fruit in two large kettles with a little water and began to simmer.
    >> As I checked the process I was surprised to see how little the apples were
    >> softening or cooking down. Must be a variety more suited to eating out of
    >> hand or making pie.
    >>
    >> These apples were greenish, some slightly yellow, some with a red blush.
    >> They are very crisp, sweet with some tartness. I am thinking perhaps
    >> Golden Delicious? It took a couple of hours on very low heat to get them
    >> ready to strain.
    >>
    >> Went to the garage cabinet to find late Mother-in-law's china cap strainer
    >> and found, also...tadaaaa! An All-Clad food mill I had found
    >> in the sale aisle at TJMaxx for $19.99 about 18 months ago, original price
    >> $119. No box, no instructions, but in perfect condition.
    >>
    >> Once I figured out I had the screen in upside down and corrected it, it
    >> went well and quickly. It produced 4 full pints of applesauce. The
    >> flavor is OK, quite sweet but lacking a bit of tartness that would have
    >> made it wonderful. Worth the effort.
    >>
    >> gloria p

    >
    >Mmmmmm Apple sauce & pork chops..


    They sound like Apple Jack.

  17. #17
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Re: Applesauce

    Kalmia wrote:
    > On Sep 28, 11:43 am, Gloria P <gpues...@comcast.net> wrote:



    >>It produced 4 full pints of applesauce. The
    >> flavor is OK, quite sweet but lacking a bit of tartness that would have
    >> made it wonderful. Worth the effort.
    >>
    >> gloria p

    >
    > Good job. Where will you store it all? Just in jars? In the
    > fridge? I wonder how it would be after freezing?
    > Pardon the dumb questions.



    Applesauce freezes wonderfully. It's a better idea to freeze
    it in plastic containers or ziplock bags rather than glass just
    in case it expands when frozen.

    We had some with dinner tonight and I am going to give away
    a couple of jars tomorrow.

    gloria p

  18. #18
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Re: Applesauce

    ChattyCathy wrote:
    > Gloria P wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >> Yesterday afternoon I walked over with a basket, tasted one of the
    >> apples, and filled the basket. They weren't perfect, many had worm
    >> holes or bruises where they were resting against a branch. The
    >> original owner took good care of the yard, recent ones have not.
    >>
    >> Got home and began to chop, cutting out any signs of damage.

    >
    > <snipped for space>
    >
    >> It produced 4 full pints of applesauce. The flavor is OK, quite
    >> sweet but lacking a bit of tartness that would have made it wonderful.
    >> Worth the effort.

    >
    > Sounds like you put them apples to good use. Clever girl, says I ;-)
    >
    > BTW, maybe you could add a lee-tle bit of lemon juice before consuming?
    > Might give it the tartness you'd like?



    Thanks, that's a good idea. I will try it. We had some for dinner
    tonight and the flavor had improved in the refrigerator.

    Whatever apples they were (I still think Golden Delicious) they took
    so long to cook down the sauce is very firm, probably more than halfway
    to apple butter.

    gloria p

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