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Thread: Apple in apple cake

  1. #1
    Gayle Hodur Guest

    Default Apple in apple cake

    I want to make a cake that calls for finely chopped apples. Does it matter
    what kind they are, or is there one kind that would be best for baking?


  2. #2
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Apple in apple cake

    On Mar 4, 2:30*pm, "Gayle Hodur" <hod...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > I want to make a cake that calls for finely chopped apples. Does it matter
    > what kind they are, or is there one kind that would be best for baking?


    you want an apple that will not fall apart and get mushy.

    I like braeburns and johnagolds.

  3. #3
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Apple in apple cake

    On Mar 4, 2:30*pm, "Gayle Hodur" <hod...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > I want to make a cake that calls for finely chopped apples. Does it matter
    > what kind they are, or is there one kind that would be best for baking?


    Northern Spy

  4. #4
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Apple in apple cake

    On Mar 4, 5:30*pm, "Gayle Hodur" <hod...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > I want to make a cake that calls for finely chopped apples. Does it matter
    > what kind they are, or is there one kind that would be best for baking?


    My mom makes a honey apple cake for Christmas every year and she
    usually uses Galas. Since the apples are going in a cake and not a pie
    it doesn't matter if the apples fall apart or not. I would however
    stay away from overly sweet apples such as Red Delicious or Golden
    Delicious. I've found when it comes to desserts with fruit in them
    that if you start out with fruit that is already sweet and then add
    more sugar to it it doesn't taste as good as using fruit that is
    slightly tart. You need that balance between tart and sweet rather
    than just all sweet.

  5. #5
    JeanineAlyse Guest

    Default Re: Apple in apple cake

    On Mar 4, 4:10*pm, "djs0...@aol.com" <djs0...@aol.com> wrote:
    > I've found when it comes to desserts with fruit in them
    > that if you start out with fruit that is already sweet and then add
    > more sugar to it it doesn't taste as good as using fruit that is
    > slightly tart. *You need that balance between tart and sweet rather
    > than just all sweet.

    Excellent advise. Granny Smiths are quite tart and would stand up to
    the cake's sugars and not mush. But if you can't get them and want to
    maintain a little sweet, try Ambrosias. They stand up well enough
    texture-wise to not get too mushy as proven when I used them in
    Sitara's wonderful Apple Cake.
    ....Picky


  6. #6
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Apple in apple cake

    "Gayle Hodur" wrote:
    >
    > I want to make a cake that calls for finely chopped apples. Does it matter
    > what kind they are, or is there one kind that would be best for baking?


    Use what the pros use, best apple for baking is dehy... no labor, no
    waste, no mushy apples, you'll always have apples on hand... one pound
    of dehys = ten pounds of fresh. And now even better are freeze dried:
    http://store.honeyvillegrain.com/fre...slargecan.aspx

  7. #7
    Judy Haffner Guest

    Default Re: Apple in apple cake


    Picky wrote:

    >Excellent advise. Granny Smiths are
    > quite tart and would stand up to the
    > cake's sugars and not mush. But if you
    > can't get them and want to maintain a
    > little sweet, try Ambrosias. They stand
    > up well enough texture-wise to not get
    > too mushy as proven when I used them
    > in Sitara's wonderful Apple Cake.


    I mostly always buy Granny Smith apples to use in baking, especially in
    pies and crisps. They are more tart and stay firm, and just have a good
    flavor to them. I don't suppose it would matter all that much for a
    cake, as I think basically any apple would do in a cake, and it would
    still taste yummy.

    Judy


  8. #8
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Apple in apple cake

    On Mar 4, 2:30*pm, "Gayle Hodur" <hod...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > I want to make a cake that calls for finely chopped apples. Does it matter
    > what kind they are, or is there one kind that would be best for baking?


    Here's one of my favorite apple cake recipes. so good.

    http://hizzoners.com/recipes/cookies...esh-apple-cake

  9. #9
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Apple in apple cake

    Brooklyn1 wrote:
    > "Gayle Hodur" wrote:
    >> I want to make a cake that calls for finely chopped apples. Does it matter
    >> what kind they are, or is there one kind that would be best for baking?

    >
    > Use what the pros use, best apple for baking is dehy... no labor, no
    > waste, no mushy apples, you'll always have apples on hand... one pound
    > of dehys = ten pounds of fresh. And now even better are freeze dried:
    > http://store.honeyvillegrain.com/fre...slargecan.aspx


    Do you have a can of those? Of so, where do they emanate from? A
    lot of the freeze-dried fruit comes from China.

    Thanks for the reminder to make something with my dried apples.

    --
    Jean B.

  10. #10
    JL Guest

    Default Re: Apple in apple cake

    Gayle Hodur wrote:
    > I want to make a cake that calls for finely chopped apples. Does it
    > matter what kind they are, or is there one kind that would be best for
    > baking?


    That's a matter of opinion, my mother could do wonders with little green
    apples no body wanted enough to go pick, that grew wild all over the place.

    But ihave a recipe for an apple upside down cake, i have yet to find a
    really good pineapple upside down cake.

    As with all recipes the ingredients one brings to the composing of the
    recipe predetermines the taste of the finished product. Good tasting
    ingredients will produce good tasting results.

    And its probly just me but i find really ripe, fresh fruit very scarce
    in the big city, its there at upscale 'gourmet' markets but even they
    must stock it for X amount of time so not orchard fresh as i was spoiled
    by in my youth

    I have lived in orange groves and once an avocado forest, and lots of
    pear and apple orchards. And just like figs, picked right off the tree
    at the very peak of ripeness.... well you cant pick, store, ship, stock,
    vend or sell and have it sit around for a few days before you make a
    cake of it and exoect it to be as fresh as just picked

    Fresh is best so whether you like a sour apple, tart and crisp (and
    don't even get me started on Loire valley pear wine or sweet and
    fruity so long as you like the apple ..... now if you are cooking for
    more than yourself you can please yourself, and if your being honest
    with yourself no one will really have much to complain of, or you can
    try to develop an understanding of what types of basic flavors the
    people you are cooking for like and try to please everybody with some
    thoughtful consideration of varying personal taste.

    Taken too far this can result in inoffensive generic blandness, beige
    cooking.

    I prefer distinctly flavored foods and nothing too sweet or salty.

    Here's a recipe for the apple upside down cake.

    It calls for tart green apples but i have made it to good effect with
    sweet apples. So much better, IMO, than the more common pineapple
    upside down cake.

    Apple upside down cake

    ---------------------------
    4 or 5 tart cooking apples
    lemon juice
    2 tbs. butter
    1 cup (packed) light brown sugar, sifted
    1 egg
    1 cup granulated white sugar
    1 cup whipping cream
    1 tsp. vanilla extract
    2 cups all purpose flour
    2 tsp. baking powder
    confectioners' sugar

    Peel the apples and remove the cores. Slice the apples paper thin with
    a mandolin or very sharp knife then sprinkle lightly with lemon juice to
    keep from discoloring.

    Place the butter in a 9 inch round, shallow baking dish. Place in a
    preheated 325 F oven until melted, then remove from oven. Do not turn
    off heat. Sprinkle the brown sugar over the butter. Overlap the apple
    slices in the baking dish, working from the center to the outside with
    only 1/4 inch between each overlap, until the bottom is covered.
    Place the egg in a mixing bowl and beat well with an electric mixer.
    Add the sugar gradually and beat until mixed. Mix the cream and
    vanilla. Sift the flour with the baking powder, then add to the egg
    mixture alternately with the cream mixture, beating well after each
    addition.

    Pour over the apples. Bake for about 35 minutes or until a cake tester
    inserted in the center comes out clean.

    Let cool for 10 minutes, then turn out onto a rack and cool.
    Place on a cake plate and cut into servings. Sprinkle each serving with
    confectioners' sugar and if desired serve with Chantilly Cream.
    ---
    JL



  11. #11
    Judy Haffner Guest

    Default Re: Apple in apple cake


    JL your Apple Upside Down Cake sounds good, and I definitely will copy
    that recipe. I have one somewhere, that I have made. I need to hunt it
    up and compare.

    I have many good apple cake recipes, but these are two of our favorite.

    Apple Tube Cake

    1-1/2 cups cooking oil
    2 cups sugar
    3 eggs
    1 tsp. salt
    1 tsp. baking soda
    3 cups flour
    3 cups chopped raw apple
    1 cup chopped nuts
    1 tsp. vanilla
    1 tsp. almond extract
    1 tsp. cinnamon

    Beat all ingredients together well, except for apples and nuts. Stir
    those in by hand (batter will be thick). Put into a greased/floured 10"
    tube pan. Bake at 350 for about 1-1/2 hours....I bake it less in my
    oven, as it bakes a little hot.

    Apple Cake

    4 cups peeled/chopped apples
    2 cups sugar
    2 beaten eggs
    1 cup cooking oil
    2 cups flour
    1 tsp. salt
    1-1/2 tsp. baking soda
    1/2 tsp. baking powder
    2 tsp. cinnamon
    2 tsp. vanilla
    1 cup chopped pecans

    Beat it altogether and bake in a greased/floured 9 x13" baking pan at
    350 for 45 minutes, or till tests done. Cool and frost.

    Creamy Frosting

    Cook until thick: 2-1/2 tbsp. flour and 1/2 cup milk. Cool completely.

    Whip together well until fluffy:
    1/2 cup butter
    3/4 cup granulated sugar
    1 tsp. vanilla

    Add cooled flour-milk mixture and continue to beat till consistency of
    whipped cream.

    Judy


  12. #12
    Zz Yzx Guest

    Default Re: Apple in apple cake

    On Sun, 4 Mar 2012 14:30:18 -0800, "Gayle Hodur" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I want to make a cake that calls for finely chopped apples. Does it matter
    >what kind they are, or is there one kind that would be best for baking?


    For cooking my fav is Pippin.

    For eating fresh, Jazz. From New Zealand, but I think they grow them
    here too now.

  13. #13
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Apple in apple cake

    On Mar 4, 4:30*pm, "Gayle Hodur" <hod...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > I want to make a cake that calls for finely chopped apples. Does it matter
    > what kind they are, or is there one kind that would be best for baking?


    I always use Jonathans. Granny Smith are too hard/too tart for me.

    N.

  14. #14
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Apple in apple cake

    Nancy2 wrote:
    >
    > On Mar 4, 4:30 pm, "Gayle Hodur" <hod...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > > I want to make a cake that calls for finely chopped apples. Does it matter
    > > what kind they are, or is there one kind that would be best for baking?

    >
    > I always use Jonathans. Granny Smith are too hard/too tart for me.


    I always use good firm Red Delicious for any apple recipe. Made a pie with
    Granny Smith once and it did not taste so good.

    Gary

  15. #15
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Apple in apple cake

    On 05/03/2012 10:30 AM, Gary wrote:
    > Nancy2 wrote:
    >>
    >> On Mar 4, 4:30 pm, "Gayle Hodur"<hod...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >>> I want to make a cake that calls for finely chopped apples. Does it matter
    >>> what kind they are, or is there one kind that would be best for baking?

    >>
    >> I always use Jonathans. Granny Smith are too hard/too tart for me.

    >
    > I always use good firm Red Delicious for any apple recipe. Made a pie with
    > Granny Smith once and it did not taste so good.



    Sorry, but I would not use a Red Delicious for anything, and especially
    not for cooking. They turn to mush. Any apple dish that is being cooked
    should have a nice ripe cooking apple, something that retains some texture.

  16. #16
    JeanineAlyse Guest

    Default Re: Apple in apple cake

    On Mar 4, 6:44*pm, ImStillMags <sitara8...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > Here's one of my favorite apple cake recipes. * so good.
    >
    > http://hizzoners.com/recipes/cookies...esh-apple-cake

    Made in my home and proven to be excellent! I did not have cake flour
    on hand, so I sifted my all-purpose flour. Because I was leery of the
    mouth feel of apple peels, I also peeled Ambrosia apples but was
    assured by Sitara the peeling seems to disolve when baked within this
    moist and delicious cake.
    ....Picky


  17. #17
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Apple in apple cake

    JL wrote:
    > Gayle Hodur wrote:
    >> I want to make a cake that calls for finely chopped apples. Does it
    >> matter what kind they are, or is there one kind that would be best for
    >> baking?

    >
    > That's a matter of opinion, my mother could do wonders with little green
    > apples no body wanted enough to go pick, that grew wild all over the place.
    >
    > But ihave a recipe for an apple upside down cake, i have yet to find a
    > really good pineapple upside down cake.
    >
    > As with all recipes the ingredients one brings to the composing of the
    > recipe predetermines the taste of the finished product. Good tasting
    > ingredients will produce good tasting results.
    >
    > And its probly just me but i find really ripe, fresh fruit very scarce
    > in the big city, its there at upscale 'gourmet' markets but even they
    > must stock it for X amount of time so not orchard fresh as i was spoiled
    > by in my youth
    >
    > I have lived in orange groves and once an avocado forest, and lots of
    > pear and apple orchards. And just like figs, picked right off the tree
    > at the very peak of ripeness.... well you cant pick, store, ship, stock,
    > vend or sell and have it sit around for a few days before you make a
    > cake of it and exoect it to be as fresh as just picked
    >
    > Fresh is best so whether you like a sour apple, tart and crisp (and
    > don't even get me started on Loire valley pear wine or sweet and
    > fruity so long as you like the apple ..... now if you are cooking for
    > more than yourself you can please yourself, and if your being honest
    > with yourself no one will really have much to complain of, or you can
    > try to develop an understanding of what types of basic flavors the
    > people you are cooking for like and try to please everybody with some
    > thoughtful consideration of varying personal taste.
    >
    > Taken too far this can result in inoffensive generic blandness, beige
    > cooking.
    >
    > I prefer distinctly flavored foods and nothing too sweet or salty.
    >
    > Here's a recipe for the apple upside down cake.
    >
    > It calls for tart green apples but i have made it to good effect with
    > sweet apples. So much better, IMO, than the more common pineapple
    > upside down cake.
    >
    > Apple upside down cake
    >
    > ---------------------------
    > 4 or 5 tart cooking apples
    > lemon juice
    > 2 tbs. butter
    > 1 cup (packed) light brown sugar, sifted
    > 1 egg
    > 1 cup granulated white sugar
    > 1 cup whipping cream
    > 1 tsp. vanilla extract
    > 2 cups all purpose flour
    > 2 tsp. baking powder
    > confectioners' sugar
    >
    > Peel the apples and remove the cores. Slice the apples paper thin with
    > a mandolin or very sharp knife then sprinkle lightly with lemon juice to
    > keep from discoloring.
    >
    > Place the butter in a 9 inch round, shallow baking dish. Place in a
    > preheated 325 F oven until melted, then remove from oven. Do not turn
    > off heat. Sprinkle the brown sugar over the butter. Overlap the apple
    > slices in the baking dish, working from the center to the outside with
    > only 1/4 inch between each overlap, until the bottom is covered.
    > Place the egg in a mixing bowl and beat well with an electric mixer.
    > Add the sugar gradually and beat until mixed. Mix the cream and
    > vanilla. Sift the flour with the baking powder, then add to the egg
    > mixture alternately with the cream mixture, beating well after each
    > addition.
    >
    > Pour over the apples. Bake for about 35 minutes or until a cake tester
    > inserted in the center comes out clean.
    >
    > Let cool for 10 minutes, then turn out onto a rack and cool.
    > Place on a cake plate and cut into servings. Sprinkle each serving with
    > confectioners' sugar and if desired serve with Chantilly Cream.
    > ---
    > JL
    >
    >

    That's looks like a worthy cake! I made some upside-down cakes
    during peach-nectarine-raspberry season and mused about the
    possibility of an apple upside-down cake. I suspect that a drier
    fruit like an apple would produce a less-mushy cake, right?

    --
    Jean B.

  18. #18
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Apple in apple cake

    On Sun, 04 Mar 2012 22:01:23 -0500, "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >> "Gayle Hodur" wrote:
    >>> I want to make a cake that calls for finely chopped apples. Does it matter
    >>> what kind they are, or is there one kind that would be best for baking?

    >>
    >> Use what the pros use, best apple for baking is dehy... no labor, no
    >> waste, no mushy apples, you'll always have apples on hand... one pound
    >> of dehys = ten pounds of fresh. And now even better are freeze dried:
    >> http://store.honeyvillegrain.com/fre...slargecan.aspx

    >
    >Do you have a can of those? Of so, where do they emanate from? A
    >lot of the freeze-dried fruit comes from China.


    I read recently that 80% of the US strawberry crop is freeze dried.
    You can phone Honeyville Grain to ask where their apples come from.

    >Thanks for the reminder to make something with my dried apples.


    I buy bags of mixed dehydrated fruit and single fruit (apricots,
    prunes, raisins, currants, etc., even Craisins) because I like
    compote... I buy them at Walmart and on line direct from Sun Maid and
    all say Product of California. Ocassionally I buy other brands, right
    now I have pitted prunes (Mariani.com), also product of CA. I've seen
    dried tropical fruits from other countries (pineapple from Thailand)
    but I don't buy those except rarely. Even when I buy pistachios I get
    the CA ones. This is by far the best place to buy dried fruits in
    bulk, all I've tried are wonderful, especially their figs:
    http://sunmaidstore.sunmaid.com/
    They do sell dried apples but I've not tried them nor are they in
    bulk:
    http://sunmaidstore.sunmaid.com/inde...oduct_id=29789
    There are plenty of sources on line for bulk dehy apples... but next
    I'm inclined I will try the freeze dried... in fact next time I place
    an order with Honeyville I will order a large can of their apples.


  19. #19
    Kate Connally Guest

    Default Re: Apple in apple cake

    On 3/4/2012 5:30 PM, Gayle Hodur wrote:
    > I want to make a cake that calls for finely chopped apples. Does it
    > matter what kind they are, or is there one kind that would be best for
    > baking?


    My choice,when it comes to apples, is always McIntosh.
    I always go for flavor over texture, although I don't find
    that McIntosh always turn to "mush" as many people claim.
    And even if they do, so what??? They have the absolute
    best flavor of any apple, afaiac. And, besides, I don't think
    I'd care for firm apple texture in a cake.

    Kate

    --
    Kate Connally
    If I were as old as I feel, Id be dead already.
    Goldfish: The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    Until you bite their heads off.
    What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    mailto:[email protected]

  20. #20
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Apple in apple cake

    In article <obS4r.26836$[email protected]>,
    "Gayle Hodur" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I want to make a cake that calls for finely chopped apples. Does it matter
    > what kind they are, or is there one kind that would be best for baking?


    I like a semi-tart apple and will use a Haralson.
    --
    Barb,
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller September 5, 2011

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