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Thread: Another way to prepare zucchini

  1. #1
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Another way to prepare zucchini

    It all started when Lin brought home some small zucchini -- not QUITE baby
    zucchini, but "toddler" might be a decent description.

    In one of Julia Child's TV shows, she said that zucchini flesh contains a
    lot of water, and you can remove the water either by grating and salting the
    zucchini or by boiling the zucchini whole. I saw that same advice in a Cooks
    magazine article some twenty-odd years ago.

    I've tried grating and salting zucchini; that's what led to the zucchini
    gratin recipe I posted a month ago. Tonight I decided to try boiling the
    zucchini whole. The reason I didn't want to grate these particular zucchini
    was that they were quite young, and I was trying to retain whatever special
    delicacy they might possess from that youth. I was flying blind a bit,
    because in the Julia Child show that I saw she merely mentioned "boiling
    whole" in passing; the remainder of the show focused on a grated-zucchini
    dish. The Cooks article did the same thing, only mentioning the technique in
    passing.

    So I brought a pot of salted water to a boil and cooked the zucchini for
    seven-and-a-half minutes, after which time they were still a bit firm.
    (Mushy zucchini is not my favorite.) The zucchini were cooled for about ten
    minutes, then sliced crosswise into chunks. The chunks were combined with
    leftover roast chicken, some thinly-sliced spring onion greens, extra-virgin
    olive oil, and some marjoram. It made a nice lunch.

    Bob



  2. #2
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: Another way to prepare zucchini

    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    >It all started when Lin brought home some small zucchini -- not QUITE baby
    >zucchini, but "toddler" might be a decent description.


    6-8"? That's where I like them. I plant 8-10 plants for 4 of us.
    I'll give it away if I have to, but I like to pick lots of little
    ones.
    >
    >In one of Julia Child's TV shows, she said that zucchini flesh contains a
    >lot of water, and you can remove the water either by grating and salting the
    >zucchini or by boiling the zucchini whole. I saw that same advice in a Cooks
    >magazine article some twenty-odd years ago.


    Never heard of boiling them whole. I grate onto a towel & squeeze
    dry. I salt later.

    -snip-
    >
    >So I brought a pot of salted water to a boil and cooked the zucchini for
    >seven-and-a-half minutes, after which time they were still a bit firm.
    >(Mushy zucchini is not my favorite.) The zucchini were cooled for about ten
    >minutes, then sliced crosswise into chunks. The chunks were combined with
    >leftover roast chicken, some thinly-sliced spring onion greens, extra-virgin
    >olive oil, and some marjoram. It made a nice lunch.


    It sounds good-- but what about the water? Does it all run out when
    you slice it? Does boiling whole affect the taste?

    Jim

  3. #3
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Another way to prepare zucchini

    Jim asked:

    >> It all started when Lin brought home some small zucchini -- not QUITE
    >> baby zucchini, but "toddler" might be a decent description.

    >
    > 6-8"? That's where I like them. I plant 8-10 plants for 4 of us.
    > I'll give it away if I have to, but I like to pick lots of little
    > ones.


    We're growing zucchini this year, but more for the blossoms than the squash
    itself. These zucchini were about six inches long, and Lin got them from a
    farmers' market.



    >> In one of Julia Child's TV shows, she said that zucchini flesh contains a
    >> lot of water, and you can remove the water either by grating and salting
    >> the zucchini or by boiling the zucchini whole. I saw that same advice in
    >> a Cooks magazine article some twenty-odd years ago.

    >
    > Never heard of boiling them whole. I grate onto a towel & squeeze
    > dry. I salt later.
    >
    > -snip-
    >>
    >> So I brought a pot of salted water to a boil and cooked the zucchini for
    >> seven-and-a-half minutes, after which time they were still a bit firm.
    >> (Mushy zucchini is not my favorite.) The zucchini were cooled for about
    >> ten minutes, then sliced crosswise into chunks. The chunks were combined
    >> with leftover roast chicken, some thinly-sliced spring onion greens,
    >> extra-virgin olive oil, and some marjoram. It made a nice lunch.

    >
    > It sounds good-- but what about the water? Does it all run out when
    > you slice it? Does boiling whole affect the taste?


    I think Julia and the Cooks author must have misstated the case: The water
    was *not* driven out, but the zucchini was cooked through without being
    mushy. I speculate that boiling whole somehow manages to cook the vegetable
    without breaking the cell walls (which is what causes zucchini to become
    mushy). I could be wrong about it; maybe if I'd boiled the zucchini longer
    it would have become mushy, but I don't plan to conduct that experiment.

    Bob




  4. #4
    Felice Guest

    Default Re: Another way to prepare zucchini

    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    news:4dcb6f33$0$28800$c3e8da3$[email protected] eb.com
    > It all started when Lin brought home some small zucchini -- not
    > QUITE
    > baby zucchini, but "toddler" might be a decent description.
    >
    > In one of Julia Child's TV shows, she said that zucchini flesh
    > contains a lot of water, and you can remove the water either by
    > grating and salting the zucchini or by boiling the zucchini whole. I
    > saw that same advice in a Cooks magazine article some twenty-odd
    > years ago.
    > I've tried grating and salting zucchini; that's what led to the
    > zucchini gratin recipe I posted a month ago. Tonight I decided to
    > try
    > boiling the zucchini whole. The reason I didn't want to grate these
    > particular zucchini was that they were quite young, and I was trying
    > to retain whatever special delicacy they might possess from that
    > youth. I was flying blind a bit, because in the Julia Child show
    > that
    > I saw she merely mentioned "boiling whole" in passing; the remainder
    > of the show focused on a grated-zucchini dish. The Cooks article did
    > the same thing, only mentioning the technique in passing.
    >
    > So I brought a pot of salted water to a boil and cooked the zucchini
    > for seven-and-a-half minutes, after which time they were still a bit
    > firm. (Mushy zucchini is not my favorite.) The zucchini were cooled
    > for about ten minutes, then sliced crosswise into chunks. The chunks
    > were combined with leftover roast chicken, some thinly-sliced spring
    > onion greens, extra-virgin olive oil, and some marjoram. It made a
    > nice lunch.
    > Bob


    Did you see Vilco's post today on Pasticcio di zucchine [zucchini
    pate] with boiled zucchini, squeezed after boiling? Gotta try the
    boiling trick!
    Felice



  5. #5
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Another way to prepare zucchini

    On Thu, 12 May 2011 05:16:00 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > We're growing zucchini this year, but more for the blossoms than the squash
    > itself. These zucchini were about six inches long, and Lin got them from a
    > farmers' market.


    I envisioned them smaller. 6-8 inches is average grocery store
    zucchini. I have to really hunt to find any worth stuffing.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  6. #6
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Another way to prepare zucchini

    sf wrote:

    > I envisioned them smaller. 6-8 inches is average grocery store
    > zucchini. I have to really hunt to find any worth stuffing.


    These were quite slender, also.

    Bob



  7. #7
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Another way to prepare zucchini

    On Thu, 12 May 2011 18:58:34 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > sf wrote:
    >
    > > I envisioned them smaller. 6-8 inches is average grocery store
    > > zucchini. I have to really hunt to find any worth stuffing.

    >
    > These were quite slender, also.
    >

    Good!

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

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