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Thread: Another lasagna with bechamel

  1. #1
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Another lasagna with bechamel

    I was looking around the food blogs I read, and I found that Elise, of
    Simply Recipes also has this type of lasagna in her files. She calls
    it Lasagna Bolognese, which confirms what I know, that this is a
    northern Italian variety.

    http://elise.com/recipes/archives/00..._bolognese.php

    She also layers it as I do....

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  2. #2
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Another lasagna with bechamel

    On Mon, 14 Sep 2009 19:50:11 -0600, Christine Dabney
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I was looking around the food blogs I read, and I found that Elise, of
    >Simply Recipes also has this type of lasagna in her files. She calls
    >it Lasagna Bolognese, which confirms what I know, that this is a
    >northern Italian variety.
    >
    >http://elise.com/recipes/archives/00..._bolognese.php
    >
    >She also layers it as I do....
    >
    >Christine


    Replying to my own post:

    I was just reading more of the food blogs..and this was a challenge of
    the Daring Bakers....in March. Evidently in her wonderful book, The
    Splendid Table, Lynn Rossetto Kasper has a lasagna Bolognese too, made
    with sauce bolognese, bechamel, and Parmesan.

    I should remind all of you, that bechamel did NOT originate in France,
    but in Italy. It was brought to France by Catherine di Medici's
    cooks, when she married the King of France. It was then adopted by
    the French.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  3. #3
    Kris Guest

    Default Re: Another lasagna with bechamel

    On Sep 14, 9:50*pm, Christine Dabney <artis...@ix.netcom.com> wrote:
    > I was looking around the food blogs I read, and I found that Elise, of
    > Simply Recipes also has this type of lasagna in her files. *She calls
    > it Lasagna Bolognese, which confirms what I know, that this is a
    > northern Italian variety.
    >
    > http://elise.com/recipes/archives/00..._bolognese.php
    >
    > She also layers it as I do....
    >
    > Christine
    > --http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com


    Yum! Saved!

    How odd - I also saved another bechamel lasagna today! (What are the
    odds?) This lasagna also has zucchini. FWIW, here it is:

    Zucchini Lasagna
    adapted from Thibeault’s Table

    1 pound lean ground beef
    1 pound ground hot Italian pork sausage
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    1 onion, chopped
    1 stalk celery, chopped
    3 cloves garlic, minced
    1 tablespoon dried parsley
    2 tablespoons dried basil
    1 teaspoon dried oregano
    1 teaspoon kosher salt
    1 teaspoon ground black pepper
    1/2 cup heavy cream or milk
    28 oz. can diced tomatoes with juice
    1 pint ricotta cheese
    1/2 cup fresh grated Parmesan cheese
    1 egg
    2 cups grated mozzarella
    2 medium sized zucchini, sliced into thin rounds
    4 tablespoons unsalted butter
    1/4 cup flour
    4 cups milk
    3/4 teaspoon kosher salt

    1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Heat the olive oil in a large
    pot and saute your onions and celery until softened. Add in the garlic
    and the ground pork. Cook until meat starts to brown and is no longer
    pink. Add the salt, pepper, basil, oregano and parsley. Add the cream
    and simmer until evaporated. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least
    one hour.

    2. While the meat simmers, mix together the ricotta, Parmesan, and egg
    in a small bowl. Make the bechamel sauce by melting the 4 tablespoons
    of butter in a medium sauce pan over medium heat until foaming. Add in
    the 1/4 cup of flour and whisk together for about a minute, then
    gradually whisk in the 4 cups of milk. Turn the stove up to high heat
    and bring the mixture to a boil, whisking so it doesn’t burn. When
    it’s at a boil, add the salt and turn the heat down to medium-low.
    Simmer for about 8 minutes, whisking occasionally and scraping the
    sides and bottom of the pan so the sauce doesn’t burn. When thickened,
    remove from heat and set aside.

    3. Spoon the meat sauce into the bottom of a 9×13 casserole dish
    sprayed with Pam. Place a layer of zucchini over the meat sauce. Top
    with 1/3 of the ricotta mixture, then sprinkle with mozzarella. Top
    with more meat sauce and another layer of zucchini. Repeat. Finish
    with a layer of the meat sauce and then top with the bechamel sauce.
    Bake for 40 to 50 minutes. Cover the top with foil if the lasagna
    starts to brown to much. Remove the lasagna from the oven when the
    cheese is bubbling and the cheese is slightly golden. Let set for 5
    minutes after being removed from the oven, then serve. Serves 12.


    Wishing it were more lasagna weather now,
    Kris

  4. #4
    TammyM Guest

    Default Re: Another lasagna with bechamel

    Christine Dabney wrote:
    > I was looking around the food blogs I read, and I found that Elise, of
    > Simply Recipes also has this type of lasagna in her files. She calls
    > it Lasagna Bolognese, which confirms what I know, that this is a
    > northern Italian variety.
    >
    > http://elise.com/recipes/archives/00..._bolognese.php
    >
    > She also layers it as I do....



    Leave it to Elise to hit the ball outta the park. That's how I layer it
    too.

    TammyM

  5. #5
    TammyM Guest

    Default Re: Another lasagna with bechamel

    Kris wrote:
    > On Sep 14, 9:50 pm, Christine Dabney <artis...@ix.netcom.com> wrote:
    >> I was looking around the food blogs I read, and I found that Elise, of
    >> Simply Recipes also has this type of lasagna in her files. She calls
    >> it Lasagna Bolognese, which confirms what I know, that this is a
    >> northern Italian variety.
    >>
    >> http://elise.com/recipes/archives/00..._bolognese.php
    >>
    >> She also layers it as I do....
    >>
    >> Christine
    >> --http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

    >
    > Yum! Saved!
    >
    > How odd - I also saved another bechamel lasagna today! (What are the
    > odds?) This lasagna also has zucchini. FWIW, here it is:
    >
    > Zucchini Lasagna
    > adapted from Thibeault’s Table

    <recipe snippage>

    Yes! When I make veggie lasagne, I use grilled zucchini and eggplant in
    the layers. Adds a nice texture to the final product.

    TammyM

  6. #6
    Rhonda Anderson Guest

    Default Re: Another lasagna with bechamel

    Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Mon, 14 Sep 2009 19:50:11 -0600, Christine Dabney
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>I was looking around the food blogs I read, and I found that Elise, of
    >>Simply Recipes also has this type of lasagna in her files. She calls
    >>it Lasagna Bolognese, which confirms what I know, that this is a
    >>northern Italian variety.
    >>
    >>http://elise.com/recipes/archives/00..._bolognese.php
    >>
    >>She also layers it as I do....
    >>
    >>Christine

    >
    > Replying to my own post:
    >
    > I was just reading more of the food blogs..and this was a challenge of
    > the Daring Bakers....in March. Evidently in her wonderful book, The
    > Splendid Table, Lynn Rossetto Kasper has a lasagna Bolognese too, made
    > with sauce bolognese, bechamel, and Parmesan.
    >
    > I should remind all of you, that bechamel did NOT originate in France,
    > but in Italy. It was brought to France by Catherine di Medici's
    > cooks, when she married the King of France. It was then adopted by
    > the French.
    >
    > Christine


    I must be missing something here (which is nothing out of the ordinary
    :-)). Not sure what is unusual. Lasagne made with layers of meat sauce,
    bechamel (often with cheese added to it) and pasta is what I would expect
    if someone offered me lasagne. It's the only sort of lasagne I've ever
    made.

    --
    Rhonda Anderson
    Cranebrook, NSW, Australia

    Core of my heart, my country! Land of the rainbow gold,
    For flood and fire and famine she pays us back threefold.
    My Country, Dorothea MacKellar, 1904


  7. #7
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Another lasagna with bechamel

    On Tue 15 Sep 2009 05:29:00a, Rhonda Anderson told us...

    > Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> On Mon, 14 Sep 2009 19:50:11 -0600, Christine Dabney
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I was looking around the food blogs I read, and I found that Elise, of
    >>>Simply Recipes also has this type of lasagna in her files. She calls
    >>>it Lasagna Bolognese, which confirms what I know, that this is a
    >>>northern Italian variety.
    >>>
    >>>http://elise.com/recipes/archives/00..._bolognese.php
    >>>
    >>>She also layers it as I do....
    >>>
    >>>Christine

    >>
    >> Replying to my own post:
    >>
    >> I was just reading more of the food blogs..and this was a challenge of
    >> the Daring Bakers....in March. Evidently in her wonderful book, The
    >> Splendid Table, Lynn Rossetto Kasper has a lasagna Bolognese too, made
    >> with sauce bolognese, bechamel, and Parmesan.
    >>
    >> I should remind all of you, that bechamel did NOT originate in France,
    >> but in Italy. It was brought to France by Catherine di Medici's
    >> cooks, when she married the King of France. It was then adopted by
    >> the French.
    >>
    >> Christine

    >
    > I must be missing something here (which is nothing out of the ordinary
    >:-)). Not sure what is unusual. Lasagne made with layers of meat sauce,
    > bechamel (often with cheese added to it) and pasta is what I would expect
    > if someone offered me lasagne. It's the only sort of lasagne I've ever
    > made.
    >


    Many lasagne recipes do not use a bechamel sauce. Perhaps that's more
    prevalent in the US.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    ************************************************** **********************
    And, of course, the funniest food of all, kumquats. George Carlin




  8. #8
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Another lasagna with bechamel


    "Wayne Boatwright" ha scritto nel messaggio
    onda Anderson told us...
    >>> Replying to my own post:
    >>>


    >> I must be missing something here (which is nothing out of the ordinary
    >> >>:-)). Not sure what is unusual. Lasagne made with layers of meat sauce,

    >> bechamel (often with cheese added to it) and pasta is what I would expect
    >> >> if someone offered me lasagne. It's the only sort of lasagne I've ever
    >> >> made.

    >>

    >
    > Many lasagne recipes do not use a bechamel sauce. Perhaps that's more >
    > prevalent in the US.


    Primarily US, these days. Vilco has told you their version. Here in
    central Italy it is pasta, light tomato sauce and besciamella. Lighter the
    better. Cooks vie to make the thinnest lasagne sheets, too.



  9. #9
    Rhonda Anderson Guest

    Default Re: Another lasagna with bechamel

    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected] 5.247:

    > On Tue 15 Sep 2009 05:29:00a, Rhonda Anderson told us...
    >


    >> I must be missing something here (which is nothing out of the
    >> ordinary
    >>:-)). Not sure what is unusual. Lasagne made with layers of meat
    >>:sauce,
    >> bechamel (often with cheese added to it) and pasta is what I would
    >> expect if someone offered me lasagne. It's the only sort of lasagne
    >> I've ever made.
    >>

    >
    > Many lasagne recipes do not use a bechamel sauce. Perhaps that's more
    > prevalent in the US.
    >


    I've found the other thread that prompted this one. I hadn't realised that
    lasagne using a ricotta was the most prevalent version in the US. As I
    mentioned I think the version with bechamel sauce is the standard one here.
    Certainly if you bought a prepared lasagne, or ordered lasagne at a cafe,
    you'd get the bechamel sauce version.

    IIRC the only lasagne I've eaten with ricotta in it was a vegetarian one (a
    frozen prepared meal - maybe Lean Cuisine or similar).

    --
    Rhonda Anderson
    Cranebrook, NSW, Australia

    Core of my heart, my country! Land of the rainbow gold,
    For flood and fire and famine she pays us back threefold.
    My Country, Dorothea MacKellar, 1904


  10. #10
    Michel Boucher Guest

    Default Re: Another lasagna with bechamel

    Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > I should remind all of you, that bechamel did NOT originate in France,
    > but in Italy. It was brought to France by Catherine di Medici's
    > cooks, when she married the King of France. It was then adopted by
    > the French.


    There is another, more plausible, story of origin for the béchamel.

    It was created by Louis de Béchameil, Marquis de Nointel, maître d'hÔtel of
    Louis XIV, and a renowned gourmet.

    It is said he perfected a smaller sauce developed by François Pierre de la
    Varenne, cook to the Marquis d'Uxelles, which itself was a development of
    the cream based Tuscan "salsa colla" brought to France by Catherine de
    Médicis in the 17th century.

    http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sauce_b%C3%A9chamel

    --

    Capitalism is the astounding belief that the most wickedest
    of men will do the most wickedest of things for the greatest
    good of everyone. - John Maynard Keynes

  11. #11
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: Another lasagna with bechamel

    Christine Dabney wrote:
    > I was looking around the food blogs I read, and I found that Elise, of
    > Simply Recipes also has this type of lasagna in her files. She calls
    > it Lasagna Bolognese, which confirms what I know, that this is a
    > northern Italian variety.
    >
    > http://elise.com/recipes/archives/00..._bolognese.php
    >
    > She also layers it as I do....
    >
    > Christine
    >


    Looks good, thanks. I am going out of town on Thursday, but when I get
    back I will give this recipe a try.


    Becca

  12. #12
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Another lasagna with bechamel

    On Tue, 15 Sep 2009 08:14:10 -0500, Michel Boucher wrote:

    > Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> I should remind all of you, that bechamel did NOT originate in France,
    >> but in Italy. It was brought to France by Catherine di Medici's
    >> cooks, when she married the King of France. It was then adopted by
    >> the French.

    >
    > There is another, more plausible, story of origin for the béchamel.
    >
    > It was created by Louis de Béchameil, Marquis de Nointel, maître d'hÔtel of
    > Louis XIV, and a renowned gourmet.
    >
    > It is said he perfected a smaller sauce developed by François Pierre de la
    > Varenne, cook to the Marquis d'Uxelles, which itself was a development of
    > the cream based Tuscan "salsa colla" brought to France by Catherine de
    > Médicis in the 17th century.
    >
    > http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sauce_b%C3%A9chamel


    oh ****, the frogs have taken over wikipedia!

    your pal,
    blake

  13. #13
    Michel Boucher Guest

    Default Re: Another lasagna with bechamel

    blake murphy <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:15ni8wwvjdy12.sciouk0iymvu$.[email protected]:

    >> http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sauce_b%C3%A9chamel

    >
    > oh ****, the frogs have taken over wikipedia!


    Frogs can type? I sort of doubt it. They are batracians, after all.

    And the French have their own database on Wikipedia, the third largest
    number of articles after German and English. I suspect the unilinguals are
    not aware of the variety of languages which are available on Wikipedia, to
    wit:

    http://www.wikipedia.org/

    --

    Capitalism is the astounding belief that the most wickedest
    of men will do the most wickedest of things for the greatest
    good of everyone. - John Maynard Keynes

  14. #14
    hahabogus Guest

    Default Re: Another lasagna with bechamel

    Becca <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected] on Sep Tue 2009
    am

    > http://elise.c


    Look closely at the pictures. I have never gotten a meat sauce as thick as it is shown in the picture
    on that site (where sauce is spread on noodles). It looks like the meat sauce is so thick that 2 more
    minutes of cooking would cause a total lack of moisture. It looks more like stuff that had dipped in
    a sauce lightly and then spread on top of the noodles. Seems too dry looking to be an actual sauce.

    Read about the white sauce...I have never heated both the milk and flour butter mix seperately
    before combining them. Why is that done? Also why isn't the white sauce seasoned in anyway?
    Afterwards I re-read the white sauce section and perhaps if your are going to go the onion clove
    route heating the milk would be proper (per Wikipedia link). But in the provided recipe neither
    onion nor clove nor any seasonning is specified in the white sauce ingredient list.

    I have never made a lasagna with both types of sauces and would be the last to complain about
    something I didn't make myself at least once. But the sauce making instructions on this site don't
    strike me as correct. My meat sauces are thicker than a thick chili, but never as thick as shown here
    and my usual white sauces are usually cheddar cheese sauces or mushroom-herb sauces, and only
    require heating one pot.

    My point here is that making a 2 sauce lasagna recipe might be better from another site.

    Also I'm a firm believer of spreading a little meat sauce around the pan prior to noodle use and not
    using oil to prevent noodle sticking. (Like my oil intake isn't enough already)

    --
    Is that your nose, or are you eatting a banana? -Jimmy Durante



  15. #15
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Another lasagna with bechamel


    "hahabogus" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] 50...
    > Becca <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]
    > on Sep Tue 2009
    > am
    >
    >> http://elise.c

    >
    > Look closely at the pictures. I have never gotten a meat sauce as thick as
    > it is shown in the picture
    > on that site (where sauce is spread on noodles). It looks like the meat
    > sauce is so thick that 2 more
    > minutes of cooking would cause a total lack of moisture. It looks more
    > like stuff that had dipped in
    > a sauce lightly and then spread on top of the noodles. Seems too dry
    > looking to be an actual sauce.

    snip
    That photo was either taken of a cold lasagna that was sliced or more
    likely, was constructed of colder parts and pieces. I think it is
    impossible to get a square of hot lasagna on a plate without drippage,
    slippage or drool. The photo is too clean.
    Janet



  16. #16
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Another lasagna with bechamel

    On Wed, 16 Sep 2009 02:36:01 GMT, hahabogus <[email protected]>
    wrote:


    >I have never made a lasagna with both types of sauces and would be the last to complain about
    >something I didn't make myself at least once. But the sauce making instructions on this site don't
    >strike me as correct. My meat sauces are thicker than a thick chili, but never as thick as shown here
    >and my usual white sauces are usually cheddar cheese sauces or mushroom-herb sauces, and only
    >require heating one pot.
    >
    >My point here is that making a 2 sauce lasagna recipe might be better from another site.
    >
    >Also I'm a firm believer of spreading a little meat sauce around the pan prior to noodle use and not
    >using oil to prevent noodle sticking. (Like my oil intake isn't enough already)


    A suggestion?
    Try it before you condemn it.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  17. #17
    hahabogus Guest

    Default Re: Another lasagna with bechamel

    Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected] on Sep Tue 2009 pm

    > On Wed, 16 Sep 2009 02:36:01 GMT, hahabogus <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I have never made a lasagna with both types of sauces and would be the
    >>last to complain about something I didn't make myself at least once.
    >>But the sauce making instructions on this site don't strike me as
    >>correct. My meat sauces are thicker than a thick chili, but never as
    >>thick as shown here and my usual white sauces are usually cheddar
    >>cheese sauces or mushroom-herb sauces, and only require heating one
    >>pot.
    >>
    >>My point here is that making a 2 sauce lasagna recipe might be better
    >>from another site.
    >>
    >>Also I'm a firm believer of spreading a little meat sauce around the
    >>pan prior to noodle use and not using oil to prevent noodle sticking.
    >>(Like my oil intake isn't enough already)

    >
    > A suggestion?
    > Try it before you condemn it.
    >
    > Christine


    I'm not condemning a 2 sauce lasagna...only I'm not happy with that site's recipe.
    (See the part about trying a recipe from another site.)

    I think I'm allowed the curtesy of which recipes I'd prefer to make. And if, nay I say, when I make a
    2 sauce lasagna I'd use another recipe than that one.

    I don't want to seem heavy handed here and that recipe might be perfectly ok , but it doesn't seem
    like it to me and I'd prefer a different one from a cookbook or website I've used and trusted. Before
    I'd try a new recipe for something I haven't tried before and haven't the confidence in the recipe
    shown to me. As the sauces section of the website's recipe doesn't ring true to me.

    It might be perfectly OK for you and your experience in the 2 sauce lasagna is way vaster than
    mine. But it isn't ok for me, just because the recipe seems wrong to me. And having confidence in
    the recipe is half the battle.

    It just might be like the 'putting mayo in chocolate cake syndrome'...at least let me be more
    confident in making chocolate cakes before insisting I try adding the mayo.

    --
    Is that your nose, or are you eatting a banana? -Jimmy Durante



  18. #18
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Another lasagna with bechamel

    On Tue, 15 Sep 2009 12:33:26 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Many lasagne recipes do not use a bechamel sauce. Perhaps that's more
    >prevalent in the US.


    I certainly don't use them together.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  19. #19
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Another lasagna with bechamel

    On Tue, 15 Sep 2009 12:01:03 -0500, Michel Boucher wrote:

    > blake murphy <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:15ni8wwvjdy12.sciouk0iymvu$.[email protected]:
    >
    >>> http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sauce_b%C3%A9chamel

    >>
    >> oh ****, the frogs have taken over wikipedia!

    >
    > Frogs can type? I sort of doubt it. They are batracians, after all.
    >
    > And the French have their own database on Wikipedia, the third largest
    > number of articles after German and English. I suspect the unilinguals are
    > not aware of the variety of languages which are available on Wikipedia, to
    > wit:
    >
    > http://www.wikipedia.org/


    well, they should speak english, as god intended and jesus did.

    your pal,
    blake

  20. #20
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Another lasagna with bechamel

    On Tue, 15 Sep 2009 21:59:37 -0600, Christine Dabney wrote:

    > On Wed, 16 Sep 2009 02:36:01 GMT, hahabogus <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>I have never made a lasagna with both types of sauces and would be the last to complain about
    >>something I didn't make myself at least once. But the sauce making instructions on this site don't
    >>strike me as correct. My meat sauces are thicker than a thick chili, but never as thick as shown here
    >>and my usual white sauces are usually cheddar cheese sauces or mushroom-herb sauces, and only
    >>require heating one pot.
    >>
    >>My point here is that making a 2 sauce lasagna recipe might be better from another site.
    >>
    >>Also I'm a firm believer of spreading a little meat sauce around the pan prior to noodle use and not
    >>using oil to prevent noodle sticking. (Like my oil intake isn't enough already)

    >
    > A suggestion?
    > Try it before you condemn it.
    >
    > Christine


    that is not in accordance with god's great plan.

    your pal,
    blake

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