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Thread: Another fine improvised soup from Lin

  1. #1
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Another fine improvised soup from Lin

    Lin made a spicy soup last night which was noteworthy (in a very good way).
    Here's the description of what she did:

    ==============================BEGIN QUOTE==============================

    My Spicy Chicken Stock -- at least 6-8 cups (I made a lot) with fat
    removed.

    Add and simmer for an hour or two:
    Chicken and Carrots that had cooked in the original stock
    Additional Salt, Pepper and Garlic to taste
    Ground Cardamom to taste
    Ground Curry Powder to taste
    TJ's Light Coconut Milk (1 can)
    1 Red Savina Chile, left whole
    2 LONG Red Thai Chiles, left whole
    Green curry paste -- at least 3-4 heaping teaspoons. I kept adding to
    taste as the pot simmered.

    In the meantime, put one Sugar/Pie Pumpkin in the microwave on high
    for 10 minutes. Let it sit while things are simmering.

    An hour before serving, skin and cut into 1"-2" chunks the pumpkin.
    (If the pumpkin is VERY soft it can be added 30 minutes before serving.)

    Add one can of fat free evaporated milk.

    Large cooked shrimp (as many as you care to -- in this case I think I
    had 1/4-1/2 lb.)

    Buckwheat Soba Noodles only take 3 minutes at a full boil, so I add
    them about 7-10 minutes before serving at a slow simmer. At the same
    time I add several tablespoons of chopped basil.

    ===============================END QUOTE===============================

    The pumpkin and the Red Savina chile gave Jamaican overtones to a soup which
    was Asian in many other respects. It was fantastic.

    Bob




  2. #2
    Theron Guest

    Default Re: Another fine improvised soup from Lin


    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    news:004b3795$0$32347$[email protected]..
    > Lin made a spicy soup last night which was noteworthy (in a very good
    > way).
    > Here's the description of what she did:
    >
    > ==============================BEGIN QUOTE==============================
    >
    > My Spicy Chicken Stock -- at least 6-8 cups (I made a lot) with fat
    > removed.
    >
    > Add and simmer for an hour or two:
    > Chicken and Carrots that had cooked in the original stock
    > Additional Salt, Pepper and Garlic to taste
    > Ground Cardamom to taste
    > Ground Curry Powder to taste
    > TJ's Light Coconut Milk (1 can)
    > 1 Red Savina Chile, left whole
    > 2 LONG Red Thai Chiles, left whole
    > Green curry paste -- at least 3-4 heaping teaspoons. I kept adding to
    > taste as the pot simmered.
    >
    > In the meantime, put one Sugar/Pie Pumpkin in the microwave on high
    > for 10 minutes. Let it sit while things are simmering.
    >
    > An hour before serving, skin and cut into 1"-2" chunks the pumpkin.
    > (If the pumpkin is VERY soft it can be added 30 minutes before serving.)
    >
    > Add one can of fat free evaporated milk.
    >
    > Large cooked shrimp (as many as you care to -- in this case I think I
    > had 1/4-1/2 lb.)
    >
    > Buckwheat Soba Noodles only take 3 minutes at a full boil, so I add
    > them about 7-10 minutes before serving at a slow simmer. At the same
    > time I add several tablespoons of chopped basil.
    >
    > ===============================END QUOTE===============================
    >
    > The pumpkin and the Red Savina chile gave Jamaican overtones to a soup
    > which was Asian in many other respects. It was fantastic.
    >
    > Bob
    >

    It sounds great. I think it might be a better dish with the shrimp alone.
    An addition or substitution would be some shrimp stock, either replacing the
    chicken stock or added to it. I frequently use chicken stock along with
    other stock to enrich a dish. Shuck the shells and heads from raw shrimp.
    Brown the shells in fat until they are nice and brown. I use bacon fat.
    Anything is OK, depending on your preference. Cover with water and some
    onion, and simmer for about 45 minutes to create a stock. I would always add
    the shrimp raw to a dish like this.

    Browning the shells make all the difference in the world. It gives you a
    good rich shrimp stock that would don't get at all from simply simmering the
    raw shells in water. I learned this sitting on a bar stool talking to Mark
    Miller, owner of the Coyote Cafe in Santa Fe. He's a great cookbook author,
    in addition to running great restaurants.

    Ed







  3. #3
    TammyM Guest

    Default Re: Another fine improvised soup from Lin

    Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    > Lin made a spicy soup last night which was noteworthy (in a very good way).
    > Here's the description of what she did:
    >
    > ==============================BEGIN QUOTE==============================
    >
    > My Spicy Chicken Stock -- at least 6-8 cups (I made a lot) with fat
    > removed.
    >
    > Add and simmer for an hour or two:
    > Chicken and Carrots that had cooked in the original stock
    > Additional Salt, Pepper and Garlic to taste
    > Ground Cardamom to taste
    > Ground Curry Powder to taste
    > TJ's Light Coconut Milk (1 can)
    > 1 Red Savina Chile, left whole
    > 2 LONG Red Thai Chiles, left whole
    > Green curry paste -- at least 3-4 heaping teaspoons. I kept adding to
    > taste as the pot simmered.
    >
    > In the meantime, put one Sugar/Pie Pumpkin in the microwave on high
    > for 10 minutes. Let it sit while things are simmering.
    >
    > An hour before serving, skin and cut into 1"-2" chunks the pumpkin.
    > (If the pumpkin is VERY soft it can be added 30 minutes before serving.)
    >
    > Add one can of fat free evaporated milk.
    >
    > Large cooked shrimp (as many as you care to -- in this case I think I
    > had 1/4-1/2 lb.)
    >
    > Buckwheat Soba Noodles only take 3 minutes at a full boil, so I add
    > them about 7-10 minutes before serving at a slow simmer. At the same
    > time I add several tablespoons of chopped basil.
    >
    > ===============================END QUOTE===============================
    >
    > The pumpkin and the Red Savina chile gave Jamaican overtones to a soup which
    > was Asian in many other respects. It was fantastic.


    <::swoon::> Oh my heavens, this does sound divine. And very unusual.
    Can't wait to give it a whirl, maybe Tuesday if it really does rain.

    TammyM

  4. #4
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Another fine improvised soup from Lin

    In article <004b3795$0$32347$[email protected]>,
    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > Lin made a spicy soup last night which was noteworthy (in a very good way).
    > Here's the description of what she did:


    Sounds fascinating.
    I've been considering those pie pumpkins lately as many of the other
    oddball varieties of winter squash are also now available. I love
    Turban and some of the others, Acorn, not so much. I'm thinking that
    one of those pie pumpkins would be good served as a winter squash dish
    or soup.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/home?tab=mq>
    recfoodrecipes@yahoo[email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  5. #5
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Another fine improvised soup from Lin

    In article <hao28f$5uk$[email protected]>,
    "Theron" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I frequently use chicken stock along with
    > other stock to enrich a dish. Shuck the shells and heads from raw shrimp.
    > Brown the shells in fat until they are nice and brown. I use bacon fat.
    > Anything is OK, depending on your preference. Cover with water and some
    > onion, and simmer for about 45 minutes to create a stock. I would always add
    > the shrimp raw to a dish like this.


    Sorry, but I'd not use bacon grease to brown for a seafood/shrimp stock.
    Butter and/or olive oil or possibly coconut oil.

    To me, the smokey/salty/porky flavor would overpower the sweet delicate
    flavor of the shrimp.

    I frequently make shrimp stock out of shrimp shells with good success.
    I just put the (usually previously frozen) shrimp shells into the
    pressure cooker with a stalk or two of celery, one SMALL onion, a bit of
    ground dried lemon peel, a scant dash of garlic powder and pepper and
    pressure cook for 1 hour with just enough water to cover them.

    I get a nice delicate stock this way and use it for either chowder,
    seafood soup/stew or as a rice stock.

    The last time I made a seafood stock, I made the mistake of adding crab
    shells. The flavor from those totally overwhelmed the shrimp flavor.
    Next time I have crab shells, they get done by themselves!
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/home?tab=mq>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  6. #6
    Kathleen Guest

    Default Re: Another fine improvised soup from Lin

    Omelet wrote:

    > In article <004b3795$0$32347$[email protected]>,
    > "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Lin made a spicy soup last night which was noteworthy (in a very good way).
    >>Here's the description of what she did:

    >
    >
    > Sounds fascinating.
    > I've been considering those pie pumpkins lately as many of the other
    > oddball varieties of winter squash are also now available. I love
    > Turban and some of the others, Acorn, not so much. I'm thinking that
    > one of those pie pumpkins would be good served as a winter squash dish
    > or soup.


    I've got a Delicata squash upstairs in the fridge right now.

    I made chicken soup just a few days back but Son was staying over at a
    friend's house and missed out. He whined so vociferously that I've got
    another pot of soup on the stove now, made using the remnants of last
    night's roast chicken.

    I had onion, celery and mushrooms, but no carrots. Could have sworn I
    had a bag of carrots... And I'll add those thick Amish noodles he likes
    so well.

    Anyhow, I thought about using some of the squash instead, but was afraid
    it might make the broth too sweet so I decided to leave it out. I'll
    probably bake it up for dinner tomorrow.


  7. #7
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Another fine improvised soup from Lin

    In article <TPNzm.13069$[email protected]>,
    Kathleen <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Omelet wrote:
    >
    > > In article <004b3795$0$32347$[email protected]>,
    > > "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >>Lin made a spicy soup last night which was noteworthy (in a very good way).
    > >>Here's the description of what she did:

    > >
    > >
    > > Sounds fascinating.
    > > I've been considering those pie pumpkins lately as many of the other
    > > oddball varieties of winter squash are also now available. I love
    > > Turban and some of the others, Acorn, not so much. I'm thinking that
    > > one of those pie pumpkins would be good served as a winter squash dish
    > > or soup.

    >
    > I've got a Delicata squash upstairs in the fridge right now.
    >
    > I made chicken soup just a few days back but Son was staying over at a
    > friend's house and missed out. He whined so vociferously that I've got
    > another pot of soup on the stove now, made using the remnants of last
    > night's roast chicken.
    >
    > I had onion, celery and mushrooms, but no carrots. Could have sworn I
    > had a bag of carrots... And I'll add those thick Amish noodles he likes
    > so well.
    >
    > Anyhow, I thought about using some of the squash instead, but was afraid
    > it might make the broth too sweet so I decided to leave it out. I'll
    > probably bake it up for dinner tomorrow.


    Baked and cut into chunks, might make a nice addition to the soup
    afterwards. That way the flavor would not cook into the broth?
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/home?tab=mq>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  8. #8
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Another fine improvised soup from Lin

    Ed wrote:

    > Browning the shells make all the difference in the world. It gives you a
    > good rich shrimp stock that would don't get at all from simply simmering
    > the raw shells in water. I learned this sitting on a bar stool talking to
    > Mark Miller, owner of the Coyote Cafe in Santa Fe. He's a great cookbook
    > author, in addition to running great restaurants.


    I have _Coyote Cafe_ and _Coyote Cafe Pantry_; both of them are great. I
    particularly like his cocktail recipes. I ate at the Coyote Cafe in Las
    Vegas six or seven years ago, and enjoyed it quite a bit.

    I've seen Mark Miller on TV a couple times as a judge for culinary
    competitions. In some of those shows he came across as something of a dick;
    I'm glad to hear that you had a pleasant conversation with him.

    Bob


  9. #9
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Another fine improvised soup from Lin

    Tammy wrote:

    >> The pumpkin and the Red Savina chile gave Jamaican overtones to a soup
    >> which was Asian in many other respects. It was fantastic.

    >
    > <::swoon::> Oh my heavens, this does sound divine. And very unusual.
    > Can't wait to give it a whirl, maybe Tuesday if it really does rain.


    Later that evening (okay, it was when I burped) I noticed that the Red
    Savina chile had some lemony flavor notes which were rather pleasant. I'm
    constantly on the lookout for new flavor combinations, and this
    lemon-habaņero combination is new to me. I'm making a note to use that
    combination in my next birthday dinner, something like chicken cooked in a
    claypot with nuoc mau (Vietnamese burnt-caramel sauce), lemongrass, and
    habaņeros.

    Bob


  10. #10
    Theron Guest

    Default Re: Another fine improvised soup from Lin


    "Omelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]..
    > In article <hao28f$5uk$[email protected]>,
    > "Theron" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I frequently use chicken stock along with
    >> other stock to enrich a dish. Shuck the shells and heads from raw
    >> shrimp.
    >> Brown the shells in fat until they are nice and brown. I use bacon fat.
    >> Anything is OK, depending on your preference. Cover with water and some
    >> onion, and simmer for about 45 minutes to create a stock. I would always
    >> add
    >> the shrimp raw to a dish like this.

    >
    > Sorry, but I'd not use bacon grease to brown for a seafood/shrimp stock.
    > Butter and/or olive oil or possibly coconut oil.


    I don't think I did either the last time I made shrimp stock. A mild EVO, or
    butter is what you probably should use, and have. Although with browning of
    the shells the shrimp stock becomes very assertive, nothing like you get
    from simply putting shells in simmering water. The shrimp stock can dominate
    the flavor of a seafood stew, more than clam stock.

    Ed


    > To me, the smokey/salty/porky flavor would overpower the sweet delicate
    > flavor of the shrimp.
    >
    > I frequently make shrimp stock out of shrimp shells with good success.
    > I just put the (usually previously frozen) shrimp shells into the
    > pressure cooker with a stalk or two of celery, one SMALL onion, a bit of
    > ground dried lemon peel, a scant dash of garlic powder and pepper and
    > pressure cook for 1 hour with just enough water to cover them.
    >
    > I get a nice delicate stock this way and use it for either chowder,
    > seafood soup/stew or as a rice stock.
    >
    > The last time I made a seafood stock, I made the mistake of adding crab
    > shells. The flavor from those totally overwhelmed the shrimp flavor.
    > Next time I have crab shells, they get done by themselves!
    > --
    > Peace! Om
    >
    > "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their
    > foot down."
    > --Steve Rothstein
    >
    > Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/home?tab=mq>
    > [email protected]
    > Subscribe: [email protected]




  11. #11
    Theron Guest

    Default Re: Another fine improvised soup from Lin


    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    news:00890142$0$30092$[email protected]..
    > Ed wrote:
    >
    >> Browning the shells make all the difference in the world. It gives you a
    >> good rich shrimp stock that would don't get at all from simply simmering
    >> the raw shells in water. I learned this sitting on a bar stool talking
    >> to
    >> Mark Miller, owner of the Coyote Cafe in Santa Fe. He's a great cookbook
    >> author, in addition to running great restaurants.

    >
    > I have _Coyote Cafe_ and _Coyote Cafe Pantry_; both of them are great. I
    > particularly like his cocktail recipes. I ate at the Coyote Cafe in Las
    > Vegas six or seven years ago, and enjoyed it quite a bit.
    >
    > I've seen Mark Miller on TV a couple times as a judge for culinary
    > competitions. In some of those shows he came across as something of a
    > dick;
    > I'm glad to hear that you had a pleasant conversation with him.
    >
    > Bob
    >

    He was the chef at the 4th St Grill in Berkeley, after leaving Chez Panisse.
    After that he headed to Sante Fe, and the Coyote Grill, where all that he's
    known and appreciated for started. It's incredible how many started as a
    protege of Alice Waters.

    Ed






  12. #12
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Another fine improvised soup from Lin

    In article <hapafm$teg$[email protected]>,
    "Theron" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > Sorry, but I'd not use bacon grease to brown for a seafood/shrimp stock.
    > > Butter and/or olive oil or possibly coconut oil.

    >
    > I don't think I did either the last time I made shrimp stock. A mild EVO, or
    > butter is what you probably should use, and have. Although with browning of
    > the shells the shrimp stock becomes very assertive, nothing like you get
    > from simply putting shells in simmering water. The shrimp stock can dominate
    > the flavor of a seafood stew, more than clam stock.
    >
    > Ed


    Ok, I'll give browning a try next time then, thanks. I have at least 4
    bags of shrimp shells in the freezer at the moment for more stock.
    Butter would certainly be complimentary, but don't underestimate coconut
    oil. It's inexpensive and has a sweet flavor.

    I just took off a pot of trotters so have a nice bowl of pork stock in
    the 'frige chilling for defatting and the trotters came out perfect and
    well melted, so I was able to de-bone them. I'll just eat those as is. I
    can use the collagen dose. <g>

    Not sure what I'm going to do with the stock yet. I may make a nice
    chunky veggie stew out of it but I'd need to go shopping for fresh
    produce. I _have_ used canned veggies in soups before, but I prefer not
    to. I may also just make lentils since I have a bag on hand and it's
    been awhile.

    Pork stock works well for lentils, beans or split peas but it'll still
    need carrot and onion at the very least. Hmm, come to think of it, I
    bought a bag of baby carrots a couple of days ago and they are out in
    the Hobart. I may not have to go shopping after all. :-) I can use
    celery seed instead of fresh celery for the flavor as I have no fresh
    celery on hand.

    A nice cold front blew in tonight. It's actually a bit cold outside! I
    love it. It poured yesterday so the ground is soft. I may actually go
    out when it gets light and weed out that darned herb garden and prep it
    for re-planting. I plan to lay down landscaping fabric and mulch to
    eliminate the NEED to keep it weeded! It's a pain in the ass.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/home?tab=mq>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  13. #13
    bakers is offline Assistant Cook
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    4

    Default

    that sounds great!

  14. #14
    Theron Guest

    Default Re: Another fine improvised soup from Lin


    "Omelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]..
    > In article <hapafm$teg$[email protected]>,
    > "Theron" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> > Sorry, but I'd not use bacon grease to brown for a seafood/shrimp
    >> > stock.
    >> > Butter and/or olive oil or possibly coconut oil.

    >>
    >> I don't think I did either the last time I made shrimp stock. A mild EVO,
    >> or
    >> butter is what you probably should use, and have. Although with browning
    >> of
    >> the shells the shrimp stock becomes very assertive, nothing like you get
    >> from simply putting shells in simmering water. The shrimp stock can
    >> dominate
    >> the flavor of a seafood stew, more than clam stock.
    >>
    >> Ed

    >
    > Ok, I'll give browning a try next time then, thanks. I have at least 4
    > bags of shrimp shells in the freezer at the moment for more stock.
    > Butter would certainly be complimentary, but don't underestimate coconut
    > oil. It's inexpensive and has a sweet flavor.
    >
    > I just took off a pot of trotters so have a nice bowl of pork stock in
    > the 'frige chilling for defatting and the trotters came out perfect and
    > well melted, so I was able to de-bone them. I'll just eat those as is. I
    > can use the collagen dose. <g>
    >
    > Not sure what I'm going to do with the stock yet. I may make a nice
    > chunky veggie stew out of it but I'd need to go shopping for fresh
    > produce. I _have_ used canned veggies in soups before, but I prefer not
    > to. I may also just make lentils since I have a bag on hand and it's
    > been awhile.
    >
    > Pork stock works well for lentils, beans or split peas but it'll still
    > need carrot and onion at the very least. Hmm, come to think of it, I
    > bought a bag of baby carrots a couple of days ago and they are out in
    > the Hobart. I may not have to go shopping after all. :-) I can use
    > celery seed instead of fresh celery for the flavor as I have no fresh
    > celery on hand.
    >
    > A nice cold front blew in tonight. It's actually a bit cold outside! I
    > love it. It poured yesterday so the ground is soft. I may actually go
    > out when it gets light and weed out that darned herb garden and prep it
    > for re-planting. I plan to lay down landscaping fabric and mulch to
    > eliminate the NEED to keep it weeded! It's a pain in the ass.
    > --
    > Peace! Om
    >
    >

    I'm going to make a "cassoulet" type of dish with leftover chunks of smoked
    pulled pork. Pork stock would be excellent in a dish like this where you
    move the stock taste from traditional lamb to pork. I make choucroute garni
    occsionally with leftover spare ribs as the stock flavoring ingredient. You
    can buy pork buillion cubes in most large Chinese markets. I didn't have the
    foggiest that there was such a thing. That's a long long way, however, from
    what you're doing.

    Ed






  15. #15
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Another fine improvised soup from Lin

    In article <haqrpk$p49$[email protected]>,
    "Theron" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'm going to make a "cassoulet" type of dish with leftover chunks of smoked
    > pulled pork. Pork stock would be excellent in a dish like this where you
    > move the stock taste from traditional lamb to pork. I make choucroute garni
    > occsionally with leftover spare ribs as the stock flavoring ingredient. You
    > can buy pork buillion cubes in most large Chinese markets. I didn't have the
    > foggiest that there was such a thing. That's a long long way, however, from
    > what you're doing.
    >
    > Ed


    Bullion cubes tend to be too salty, but they have their uses. :-) Have
    you ever made trotter stock? It's done chilling now and I've defatted
    it, and it's solid as rubber right now. <g> I do have some pork meat in
    the freezer. Some of that cut into thin slices could go with the
    lentils, but I don't usually add meat chunks to that unless I've used a
    ham bone and use what I get off of that.

    Come to think of it, there is a little Canadian Bacon left out in the
    'frige. A little of that cut into small cubes would be complimentary...
    So would some bacon bits.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/home?tab=mq>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  16. #16
    PeterL Guest

    Default Re: Another fine improvised soup from Lin

    TammyM <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:


    >> Ground Cardamom to taste
    >> Ground Curry Powder to taste
    >> Green curry paste -- at least 3-4 heaping teaspoons. I kept adding to
    >> taste as the pot simmered.
    >>


    >
    > <::swoon::> Oh my heavens, this does sound divine. And very unusual.
    > Can't wait to give it a whirl, maybe Tuesday if it really does rain.





    Why anyone would add the above 3 ingredients together is beyond me!!

    Cardamon..... an essential ingredient in a curry powder.

    It would be negated by the "curry powder to taste" (and as the OP has
    taste in his arse, it'd have to use quite a lot!!)

    And then they would in turn be negated by the "Green curry paste, to
    taste"!!


    Sounds like a COS to me.


    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia


    If we are not meant to eat animals,
    why are they made of meat?

  17. #17
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Another fine improvised soup from Lin

    Peter sniped:

    >>> Ground Cardamom to taste
    >>> Ground Curry Powder to taste
    >>> Green curry paste -- at least 3-4 heaping teaspoons. I kept adding to
    >>> taste as the pot simmered.
    >>>

    >
    >>
    >> <::swoon::> Oh my heavens, this does sound divine. And very unusual.
    >> Can't wait to give it a whirl, maybe Tuesday if it really does rain.

    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Why anyone would add the above 3 ingredients together is beyond me!!
    >
    > Cardamon..... an essential ingredient in a curry powder.
    >
    > It would be negated by the "curry powder to taste" (and as the OP has
    > taste in his arse, it'd have to use quite a lot!!)
    >
    > And then they would in turn be negated by the "Green curry paste, to
    > taste"!!
    >
    >
    > Sounds like a COS to me.



    Sounds like someone thinks Lin is a man. Also sounds like someone thinks "to
    taste" means "until all other flavors are obliterated."

    Rather telling, isn't it?

    Bob



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