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Thread: Another duck question

  1. #1
    Janet Guest

    Default Another duck question

    In reading many, many duck recipes over the last couple of days, I've noted
    that there seems to be a division between those that roast the duck for
    about an hour at most--sounds as if it would still be pink inside--and those
    that cook it for several hours, or until it is almost falling apart tender.
    Some of the latter then cut it up and bone it before serving. Almost all
    make a pan sauce, often with a fruity element, as one might expect with
    game..

    Does anyone here have a preference between the pink-inside duck and the
    well-cooked duck, and if so why?




  2. #2
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: Another duck question

    Janet wrote:
    >
    > In reading many, many duck recipes over the last couple of days, I've noted
    > that there seems to be a division between those that roast the duck for
    > about an hour at most--sounds as if it would still be pink inside--and those
    > that cook it for several hours, or until it is almost falling apart tender.
    > Some of the latter then cut it up and bone it before serving. Almost all
    > make a pan sauce, often with a fruity element, as one might expect with
    > game..
    >
    > Does anyone here have a preference between the pink-inside duck and the
    > well-cooked duck, and if so why?


    Rare duck is greasy and tough enough to be called stringy. Once chewed
    it does taste pretty good. The skin clings to it like a moleskin
    jacket.

    Well done duck is well drained but still rich and tender. The skin is
    crispy and comes off on your fork. Care is needed to keep it from
    drying out when cooking.

    My preference should be clear. ;^)

  3. #3
    pavane Guest

    Default Re: Another duck question


    "Doug Freyburger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:hgobhb$80f$[email protected]..
    | Janet wrote:
    | >
    | > In reading many, many duck recipes over the last couple of days, I've noted
    | > that there seems to be a division between those that roast the duck for
    | > about an hour at most--sounds as if it would still be pink inside--and those
    | > that cook it for several hours, or until it is almost falling apart tender.
    | > Some of the latter then cut it up and bone it before serving. Almost all
    | > make a pan sauce, often with a fruity element, as one might expect with
    | > game..
    | >
    | > Does anyone here have a preference between the pink-inside duck and the
    | > well-cooked duck, and if so why?
    |
    | Rare duck is greasy and tough enough to be called stringy. Once chewed
    | it does taste pretty good. The skin clings to it like a moleskin
    | jacket.
    |
    | Well done duck is well drained but still rich and tender. The skin is
    | crispy and comes off on your fork. Care is needed to keep it from
    | drying out when cooking.
    |
    | My preference should be clear. ;^)

    I agree completely, I have never had an underdone duck that I actually
    liked, have eaten a few to make cooks feel happy, and would always opt
    for a "rich and tender" well cooked duck, particularly with a good savory
    sauce, or a good orange sauce, or a good cherry sauce, or ...

    pavane



  4. #4
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Another duck question

    On Mon, 21 Dec 2009 11:09:06 -0500, "Janet" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >In reading many, many duck recipes over the last couple of days, I've noted
    >that there seems to be a division between those that roast the duck for
    >about an hour at most--sounds as if it would still be pink inside--and those
    >that cook it for several hours, or until it is almost falling apart tender.
    >Some of the latter then cut it up and bone it before serving. Almost all
    >make a pan sauce, often with a fruity element, as one might expect with
    >game..
    >
    >Does anyone here have a preference between the pink-inside duck and the
    >well-cooked duck, and if so why?
    >


    I was never a fan of roast duck but, if I had to make a choice, I'd
    opt for the well done with some kind of a fruit based sauce.
    The only way I can say I actually enjoyed duck was a large Muskovy
    that I smoked over mulberry wood. That I'll do again some day.

    Ross.

  5. #5
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Another duck question

    On Mon, 21 Dec 2009 11:09:06 -0500, "Janet" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Does anyone here have a preference between the pink-inside duck and the
    >well-cooked duck, and if so why?


    I love seared *rare* duck breast and confit made from the leg and
    thigh. I don't like duck breast cooked through though, not even to
    pink - I want it rare, otherwise it's too gamey tasting for me... you
    read that right. Even commercial farmed duck is too gamey tasting for
    me.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  6. #6
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Another duck question

    On Mon, 21 Dec 2009 17:33:31 +0000 (UTC), Doug Freyburger
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Rare duck is greasy and tough enough to be called stringy. Once chewed
    >it does taste pretty good. The skin clings to it like a moleskin
    >jacket.
    >
    >Well done duck is well drained but still rich and tender. The skin is
    >crispy and comes off on your fork. Care is needed to keep it from
    >drying out when cooking.
    >
    >My preference should be clear. ;^)


    Whole ducks are cooked with skin on, duck breasts are not served with
    skin on nor are they cooked with it on (as far as I know).

    I ordered duck breast med-rare a couple of weekends ago. Big mistake!
    I should have said rare as I always do. It was stringy and gamey to
    me. The duck was high quality, they even named the farm on the menu -
    but I didn't like it over-cooked like that. I'll never order it more
    cooked than rare from now on.



    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  7. #7
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Another duck question

    Janet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Does anyone here have a preference between the pink-inside duck and the
    > well-cooked duck, and if so why?


    As with other poultry, there is a difference in the rate of cooking of
    breast and legs. Duck breast is dark meat and for the past thirty
    years, at least, it has been fashionable to serve it pink. It works
    well with duck breast, but only with the breast. Legs requre longer
    cooking time, or they will remain unacceptable raw. So, unless you are
    willing to cook breast and legs separately, it is necessary to cook the
    whole duck until the legs are cooked through. This has always been the
    old, traditional method, and it works well because duck takes well to
    longer cooking - and you get crispy skin into the bargain. Still, it is
    not necessary to roast an average-sized domestic duck for much longer
    than about 1 1/2 hours unless the gravy is more important to you than
    the duck itself.

    Victor

  8. #8
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: Another duck question


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]..
    > On Mon, 21 Dec 2009 11:09:06 -0500, "Janet" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Does anyone here have a preference between the pink-inside duck and the
    >>well-cooked duck, and if so why?

    >
    > I love seared *rare* duck breast and confit made from the leg and
    > thigh. I don't like duck breast cooked through though, not even to
    > pink - I want it rare, otherwise it's too gamey tasting for me... you
    > read that right. Even commercial farmed duck is too gamey tasting for
    > me.
    >
    > --
    > I love cooking with wine.
    > Sometimes I even put it in the food.
    >
    >

    Right on with the duck breast and the leg. Duck leg confit is a crucial step
    on the road to cassoulet.

    Happy Holidaze,






  9. #9
    Don Martinich Guest

    Default Re: Another duck question

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Janet" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In reading many, many duck recipes over the last couple of days, I've noted
    > that there seems to be a division between those that roast the duck for
    > about an hour at most--sounds as if it would still be pink inside--and those
    > that cook it for several hours, or until it is almost falling apart tender.
    > Some of the latter then cut it up and bone it before serving. Almost all
    > make a pan sauce, often with a fruity element, as one might expect with
    > game..
    >
    > Does anyone here have a preference between the pink-inside duck and the
    > well-cooked duck, and if so why?


    My two most memorable and enjoyable duck dinners featured well-done
    birds. One was a domestic duck cooked by a Hungarian chef who had
    escaped to California during the revolution of 1956. It was not served
    with a fruit sauce nor did it need one. Garlic was the only seasoning I
    could detect. Rich and succulent.

    The other duck was a pintail shot in a Central Valley rice farm. The
    duck must have been there for a while as it was not lean. It was slowly
    cooked outdoors turning on a spit over an alder fire. Also lightly
    seasoned and no sweet saauce. It was not too dry or gamey at all.

    I also recommend the stuffed duck legs at the Bay Wolf restaurant in
    Oakland, CA.

    D.M.

  10. #10
    Michael Guest

    Default Re: Another duck question

    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Whole ducks are cooked with skin on, duck breasts are not served with
    > skin on nor are they cooked with it on (as far as I know).


    I've never had duck breast in a restaurant without the skin on.



  11. #11
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Another duck question

    Kent wrote:
    > "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news[email protected]..
    >> On Mon, 21 Dec 2009 11:09:06 -0500, "Janet" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Does anyone here have a preference between the pink-inside duck and
    >>> the well-cooked duck, and if so why?

    >>
    >> I love seared *rare* duck breast and confit made from the leg and
    >> thigh. I don't like duck breast cooked through though, not even to
    >> pink - I want it rare, otherwise it's too gamey tasting for me... you
    >> read that right. Even commercial farmed duck is too gamey tasting
    >> for me.
    >>
    >> --
    >> I love cooking with wine.
    >> Sometimes I even put it in the food.
    >>
    >>

    > Right on with the duck breast and the leg. Duck leg confit is a
    > crucial step on the road to cassoulet.
    >
    > Happy Holidaze,


    Reading what Paula Wolfert has to say on the subject in "The Cooking of
    South-West France"--a great book, if you don't have it--has convinced me
    that cutting up the duck, cooking the breast separately, rendering the fat
    and making confit from the legs (and broth from the rest) is the way to go.
    So now I need to go buy another duck so that I have sufficient breast for 4
    people.




  12. #12
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Another duck question

    Janet wrote:

    > I have sufficient breast for 4 people.


    Cue Sheldon...

    Bob



  13. #13
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Another duck question

    Victor Sack wrote:
    > Janet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Does anyone here have a preference between the pink-inside duck and
    >> the well-cooked duck, and if so why?

    >
    > As with other poultry, there is a difference in the rate of cooking of
    > breast and legs. Duck breast is dark meat and for the past thirty
    > years, at least, it has been fashionable to serve it pink. It works
    > well with duck breast, but only with the breast. Legs requre longer
    > cooking time, or they will remain unacceptable raw. So, unless you
    > are willing to cook breast and legs separately, it is necessary to
    > cook the whole duck until the legs are cooked through. This has
    > always been the old, traditional method, and it works well because
    > duck takes well to longer cooking - and you get crispy skin into the
    > bargain. Still, it is not necessary to roast an average-sized
    > domestic duck for much longer than about 1 1/2 hours unless the gravy
    > is more important to you than the duck itself.
    >
    > Victor


    <G> Gravy is almost always more important to me than any bird itself!

    But I think I've decided that cutting it up and cooling the boned breasts
    separately is the way to go.




  14. #14
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Another duck question

    Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    > Janet wrote:
    >
    >> I have sufficient breast for 4 people.

    >
    > Cue Sheldon...
    >
    > Bob

    Hah! As they say, "Let's not and say we did."




  15. #15
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: Another duck question


    "Janet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In reading many, many duck recipes over the last couple of days, I've
    > noted that there seems to be a division between those that roast the duck
    > for about an hour at most--sounds as if it would still be pink inside--and
    > those that cook it for several hours, or until it is almost falling apart
    > tender. Some of the latter then cut it up and bone it before serving.
    > Almost all make a pan sauce, often with a fruity element, as one might
    > expect with game..
    >
    > Does anyone here have a preference between the pink-inside duck and the
    > well-cooked duck, and if so why?
    >
    >

    Duck is one of the few things we cook on the rotisserie. We use a Farberware
    Rotisserie on the kitchen counter, which gets all the heat directly. This
    seems to work. The radiant heat crisps up the skin first and cooks the meat
    underneath second. The leg-thigh part is cooked more because it's closer to
    the heating element. The constant "internal basting" keeps the breast from
    drying out more, and it tastes fine even if it does get a little bit more
    done than with separate treatment of the breast and thigh. You can do this
    on an outside grill. Do it with the cover up. You don't want to create an
    oven.

    Kent




  16. #16
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Another duck question

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Janet" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In reading many, many duck recipes over the last couple of days, I've noted
    > that there seems to be a division between those that roast the duck for
    > about an hour at most--sounds as if it would still be pink inside--and those
    > that cook it for several hours, or until it is almost falling apart tender.
    > Some of the latter then cut it up and bone it before serving. Almost all
    > make a pan sauce, often with a fruity element, as one might expect with
    > game..
    >
    > Does anyone here have a preference between the pink-inside duck and the
    > well-cooked duck, and if so why?


    I prefer the crispy pink inside duck.

    Why?

    Because it's more tender and has more flavor.

    Who likes poultry of any kind overcooked and dry?
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  17. #17
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Another duck question

    In article <[email protected]>,
    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Mon, 21 Dec 2009 11:09:06 -0500, "Janet" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Does anyone here have a preference between the pink-inside duck and the
    > >well-cooked duck, and if so why?

    >
    > I love seared *rare* duck breast and confit made from the leg and
    > thigh. I don't like duck breast cooked through though, not even to
    > pink - I want it rare, otherwise it's too gamey tasting for me... you
    > read that right. Even commercial farmed duck is too gamey tasting for
    > me.


    :-)
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  18. #18
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Another duck question

    In article <00e9f7fe$0$6722$[email protected]>,
    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > Janet wrote:
    >
    > > I have sufficient breast for 4 people.

    >
    > Cue Sheldon...
    >
    > Bob


    <laughs> The same thought crossed my mind...

    unfortunately. ;-D
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  19. #19
    Bent Attorney Esq. Guest

    Default Re: Another duck question

    On Dec 22, 1:34*pm, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > In article <7p9kt1Fga...@mid.individual.net>,
    >
    > *"Janet" <boxh...@maine.rr.com> wrote:
    > > In reading many, manyduckrecipes over the last couple of days, I've noted
    > > that there seems to be a division between those thatroasttheduckfor
    > > about an hour at most--sounds as if it would still be pink inside--and those
    > > that cook it for several hours, or until it is almost falling apart tender.
    > > Some of the latter then cut it up and bone it before serving. Almost all
    > > make a pan sauce, often with a fruity element, as one might expect with
    > > game..

    >
    > > Does anyone here have a preference between the pink-insideduckand the
    > > well-cookedduck, and if so why?

    >
    > I prefer the crispy pink insideduck.
    >
    > Why?
    >
    > Because it's more tender and has more flavor.
    >
    > Who likes poultry of any kind overcooked and dry?
    > --


    Omlete, how long have you been suffering from erectile disfunction?

    > Peace! Om
    >
    > "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down." *
    > --Steve Rothstein
    >
    > Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    > recfoodreci...@yahoogroups.com
    > Subscribe: recfoodrecipes-subscr...@yahoogroups.com



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