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Thread: Anchovies

  1. #1
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Anchovies

    I bought a can (2 ounces) of anchovies, and not sure how to use them.
    How many should I add to one pound of canned tomatoes to give them a
    "meaty" taste without being too fishy or salty? I'm going to sauté them
    in the olive oil until they dissolve before I add the tomatoes.

    Thanks,
    Bob

    --
    "FEED ME!" —Audrey Jr.

  2. #2
    Mike Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies


    "zxcvbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >I bought a can (2 ounces) of anchovies, and not sure how to use them. How
    >many should I add to one pound of canned tomatoes to give them a "meaty"
    >taste without being too fishy or salty? I'm going to sauté them in the
    >olive oil until they dissolve before I add the tomatoes.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Bob
    >
    > --
    > "FEED ME!" —Audrey Jr.


    Start with 1




  3. #3
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    Mike <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"zxcvbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message


    >>I bought a can (2 ounces) of anchovies, and not sure how to use them. How
    >>many should I add to one pound of canned tomatoes to give them a "meaty"
    >>taste without being too fishy or salty? I'm going to sauté them in the
    >>olive oil until they dissolve before I add the tomatoes.


    >Start with 1


    I agree, although one tin of anchovies per 12 ounces
    of tomatoes might be a more satisfying. And be sure
    to use unsalted tomatoes.

    Steve

  4. #4
    Mack A. Damia Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    On Wed, 13 May 2009 12:37:59 -0500, zxcvbob <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I bought a can (2 ounces) of anchovies, and not sure how to use them.
    >How many should I add to one pound of canned tomatoes to give them a
    >"meaty" taste without being too fishy or salty? I'm going to sauté them
    >in the olive oil until they dissolve before I add the tomatoes.


    Mighty salty little things. I don't even like them on pizza as they
    tend to overwhelm everything.

    Now, caesar salad dressing I like.
    --
    mad

  5. #5
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    On May 13, 1:37*pm, zxcvbob <zxcv...@charter.net> wrote:
    > I bought a can (2 ounces) of anchovies, and not sure how to use them.
    > How many should I add to one pound of canned tomatoes to give them a
    > "meaty" taste without being too fishy or salty? *I'm going to sauté them
    > in the olive oil until they dissolve before I add the tomatoes.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Bob
    >
    > --
    > "FEED ME!" —Audrey Jr.


    I soak em milk to try to kill the fishy taste, them blot with towels
    before slapping on one half of the pizza ( not MINE, mind you).

    A little anchovy goes a loooooooooooooooooooooooooong way. I remember
    in my younger days tossing out a whole batch of tomato sauce once cuz
    I thought anchovies would help. I think a pinch of anchovy cud be
    detected in a cauldron of sauce.

  6. #6
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    zxcvbob wrote:
    > I bought a can (2 ounces) of anchovies, and not sure how to use them.
    > How many should I add to one pound of canned tomatoes to give them a
    > "meaty" taste without being too fishy or salty? I'm going to sauté them
    > in the olive oil until they dissolve before I add the tomatoes.


    Depends on how big the fillets are. Rinse first, about a
    half-tablespoon's worth. Then go from there.

    Anchovies are the secret ingredient in many dishes when used in
    moderation. I use them in meatloaf, for example. Getting them
    incorporated evenly can be tricky - mix with another ingredient first.

    -sw

  7. #7
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    zxcvbob wrote:
    >
    > I bought a can (2 ounces) of anchovies, and not sure how to use them.
    > How many should I add to one pound of canned tomatoes to give them a
    > "meaty" taste without being too fishy or salty? I'm going to sauté them
    > in the olive oil until they dissolve before I add the tomatoes.


    I always soak them in a few changes of water
    to remove as much salt as I can. Doesn't seem
    to hurt the flavor much.

  8. #8
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    In article <Y1EOl.26489$[email protected]>,
    Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > zxcvbob wrote:
    > > I bought a can (2 ounces) of anchovies, and not sure how to use them.
    > > How many should I add to one pound of canned tomatoes to give them a
    > > "meaty" taste without being too fishy or salty? I'm going to sauté them
    > > in the olive oil until they dissolve before I add the tomatoes.

    >
    > Depends on how big the fillets are. Rinse first, about a
    > half-tablespoon's worth. Then go from there.
    >
    > Anchovies are the secret ingredient in many dishes when used in
    > moderation. I use them in meatloaf, for example. Getting them
    > incorporated evenly can be tricky - mix with another ingredient first.
    >
    > -sw


    Shrimp stock can be a great "secret ingredient" too, and it's not quite
    as powerful even when reduced.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
    It's about learning to dance in the rain.
    -- Anon.

  9. #9
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    Omelet wrote:
    > In article <Y1EOl.26489$[email protected]>,
    > Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> zxcvbob wrote:
    >>> I bought a can (2 ounces) of anchovies, and not sure how to use them.
    >>> How many should I add to one pound of canned tomatoes to give them a
    >>> "meaty" taste without being too fishy or salty? I'm going to sauté them
    >>> in the olive oil until they dissolve before I add the tomatoes.

    >> Depends on how big the fillets are. Rinse first, about a
    >> half-tablespoon's worth. Then go from there.
    >>
    >> Anchovies are the secret ingredient in many dishes when used in
    >> moderation. I use them in meatloaf, for example. Getting them
    >> incorporated evenly can be tricky - mix with another ingredient first.
    >>
    >> -sw

    >
    > Shrimp stock can be a great "secret ingredient" too, and it's not quite
    > as powerful even when reduced.



    Oyster sauce and dark sesame oil are the secret ingredients when making
    fried rice. (The oyster sauce moreso than the sesame oil.) It doesn't
    take much of either one.

    Bob

  10. #10
    Default User Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    Omelet wrote:

    > In article <Y1EOl.26489$[email protected]>,
    > Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > zxcvbob wrote:
    > > > I bought a can (2 ounces) of anchovies, and not sure how to use
    > > > them. How many should I add to one pound of canned tomatoes to
    > > > give them a "meaty" taste without being too fishy or salty? I'm
    > > > going to sauti them in the olive oil until they dissolve before I
    > > > add the tomatoes.

    > >
    > > Depends on how big the fillets are. Rinse first, about a
    > > half-tablespoon's worth. Then go from there.
    > >
    > > Anchovies are the secret ingredient in many dishes when used in
    > > moderation. I use them in meatloaf, for example. Getting them
    > > incorporated evenly can be tricky - mix with another ingredient
    > > first.


    > Shrimp stock can be a great "secret ingredient" too, and it's not
    > quite as powerful even when reduced.


    I had a recipe for red clam sauce that added some minced anchovy to the
    sauce. That was good.




    Brian

    --
    Day 100 of the "no grouchy usenet posts" project

  11. #11
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies


    "zxcvbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >I bought a can (2 ounces) of anchovies, and not sure how to use them. How
    >many should I add to one pound of canned tomatoes to give them a "meaty"
    >taste without being too fishy or salty?


    This is a no brainer... two three fillets should do it... and drain the oil
    into the sauce too... then eat the rest au jus with a 2ni.



  12. #12
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies


    "Mark Thorson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > zxcvbob wrote:
    >>
    >> I bought a can (2 ounces) of anchovies, and not sure how to use them.
    >> How many should I add to one pound of canned tomatoes to give them a
    >> "meaty" taste without being too fishy or salty? I'm going to sauté them
    >> in the olive oil until they dissolve before I add the tomatoes.

    >
    > I always soak them in a few changes of water
    > to remove as much salt as I can. Doesn't seem
    > to hurt the flavor much.


    What a pussy... *real* men eat anchovies au jus... the gals at the bar will
    be impressed, they'll imagine you licking your eyebrows. heheh




  13. #13
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    In article <[email protected]>,
    zxcvbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Omelet wrote:
    > > In article <Y1EOl.26489$[email protected]>,
    > > Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> zxcvbob wrote:
    > >>> I bought a can (2 ounces) of anchovies, and not sure how to use them.
    > >>> How many should I add to one pound of canned tomatoes to give them a
    > >>> "meaty" taste without being too fishy or salty? I'm going to sauté them
    > >>> in the olive oil until they dissolve before I add the tomatoes.
    > >> Depends on how big the fillets are. Rinse first, about a
    > >> half-tablespoon's worth. Then go from there.
    > >>
    > >> Anchovies are the secret ingredient in many dishes when used in
    > >> moderation. I use them in meatloaf, for example. Getting them
    > >> incorporated evenly can be tricky - mix with another ingredient first.
    > >>
    > >> -sw

    > >
    > > Shrimp stock can be a great "secret ingredient" too, and it's not quite
    > > as powerful even when reduced.

    >
    >
    > Oyster sauce and dark sesame oil are the secret ingredients when making
    > fried rice. (The oyster sauce moreso than the sesame oil.) It doesn't
    > take much of either one.
    >
    > Bob


    Stir fry too, plus fresh ginger and garlic.
    But, Oyster and Sesame give it "that" flavor if you know what I mean. :-)
    --
    Peace! Om

    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
    It's about learning to dance in the rain.
    -- Anon.

  14. #14
    bulka Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    On May 13, 3:08 pm, zxcvbob <zxcv...@charter.net> wrote:
    > Omelet wrote:
    > > In article <Y1EOl.26489$c45.18...@nlpi065.nbdc.sbc.com>,
    > > Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:

    >
    > >> zxcvbob wrote:
    > >>> I bought a can (2 ounces) of anchovies, and not sure how to use them.
    > >>> How many should I add to one pound of canned tomatoes to give them a
    > >>> "meaty" taste without being too fishy or salty? I'm going to sautéthem
    > >>> in the olive oil until they dissolve before I add the tomatoes.
    > >> Depends on how big the fillets are. Rinse first, about a
    > >> half-tablespoon's worth. Then go from there.

    >
    > >> Anchovies are the secret ingredient in many dishes when used in
    > >> moderation. I use them in meatloaf, for example. Getting them
    > >> incorporated evenly can be tricky - mix with another ingredient first.

    >
    > >> -sw

    >
    > > Shrimp stock can be a great "secret ingredient" too, and it's not quite
    > > as powerful even when reduced.

    >
    > Oyster sauce and dark sesame oil are the secret ingredients when making
    > fried rice. (The oyster sauce moreso than the sesame oil.) It doesn't
    > take much of either one.
    >
    > Bob


    my "secret ingredient" is often fish sauce (nuoc mam/nam pla/patis,
    whatever), mostly fermented anchovie.

  15. #15
    Clay Irving Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    On 2009-05-14, bulka <[email protected]> wrote:

    > my "secret ingredient" is often fish sauce (nuoc mam/nam pla/patis,
    > whatever), mostly fermented anchovie.


    I agree -- It is a great seasoning for all types of cuisine, and it has been
    a spice for a very long time!

    http://www.panix.com/~clay/cookbook/...nt.cgi?nam-pla

    --
    Clay Irving <[email protected]>
    Nothing is more destructive of respect for the government and the law of
    the land than passing laws which cannot be enforced.
    - Albert Einstein

  16. #16
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    On Wed, 13 May 2009 13:30:15 -0500, Omelet wrote:

    > Shrimp stock can be a great "secret ingredient" too, and it's not quite
    > as powerful even when reduced.


    Buy Minor's Brand or "Better Than Buillion" Lobster Base. You can
    get the later at many HEB's for only $6/7oz. The convenience and
    taste beats the **** out of saving shrimp shells.

    -sw

  17. #17
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    On Wed, 13 May 2009 14:08:50 -0500, zxcvbob wrote:

    > Oyster sauce and dark sesame oil are the secret ingredients when making
    > fried rice. (The oyster sauce moreso than the sesame oil.) It doesn't
    > take much of either one.


    I've been promoting Oyster Sauce for decades. It's not usaully used
    in restaurant-fried rice, but I always add a little when cooking it
    at home. I never use soy sauce in anything.

    And I use ****loads of sesame oil in my Korean chap chae.

    -sw

  18. #18
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    On Thu, 14 May 2009 01:25:20 +0000 (UTC), Clay Irving wrote:

    > On 2009-05-14, bulka <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> my "secret ingredient" is often fish sauce (nuoc mam/nam pla/patis,
    >> whatever), mostly fermented anchovie.

    >
    > I agree -- It is a great seasoning for all types of cuisine, and it has been
    > a spice for a very long time!


    This ties in with how this subtread got started.

    Anchovies and fish/shellfish extracts are the best seasonings on
    earth. Even better when you ferment them.

    -sw

    Except surstromming.

    -sw

  19. #19
    Julian Vrieslander Guest

    Default Spaghetti alla Puttanesca (was: Re: Anchovies)

    In article <[email protected]>,
    zxcvbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I bought a can (2 ounces) of anchovies, and not sure how to use them.
    > How many should I add to one pound of canned tomatoes to give them a
    > "meaty" taste without being too fishy or salty? I'm going to sauté them
    > in the olive oil until they dissolve before I add the tomatoes.


    One of the standard quick dinners at our house is Spaghetti alla
    Puttanesca. I use an entire 2 ounce can of anchovies for one 28 ounce
    can of whole tomatoes.

    Rinse the anchovies in water to reduce the salt, and coarsely chop them.
    Then they go into a pan with 4 tablespoons of olive oil. Cook on low
    heat, stirring and poking them until they dissolve.

    Turn up the heat and add 4 garlic cloves and one small dried chili, both
    finely chopped. When the garlic starts to sizzle, add the tomatoes, a
    teaspoon of dried oregano, and black pepper. Bring to a boil, stirring
    and mashing the tomatoes. Then turn down the heat and simmer for 30
    minutes, or until you get a thick, full-flavored sauce.

    While the sauce is cooking, remove the pits from some good quality black
    olives. I usually buy pitted Kalamatas from the deli counter at our
    market, and cut them in half. A few minutes before you are ready to
    serve, toss the olives and some capers into the sauce and stir.

    This is my favorite pasta sauce. Even Cindy (my SO, and resident
    nutritionist of RFC) likes it - and she usually hates anything that's
    been near an anchovy. In fact, the sauce does not have any fishy
    flavor. The anchovies just add a subtle savory (umami?) quality.

    This recipe was adapted from The Classic Mediterranean Cookbook, by
    Sarah Woodward. As written, the recipe calls for one cup of olives and
    2 Tbs of capers, which I think is way too much. Sarah calls for 1 lb of
    dry pasta, probably to feed 4. We use 1/2 lb of spaghetti for the two
    of us, and the recipe produces just enough sauce.

    The recipe's name translates as "whore's spaghetti". Sarah speculates
    that it got this name because it goes together quickly with ingredients
    from the pantry. Perfect for professionals who have little time to
    cook, and who work at odd hours when the stores and restaurants are not
    open.

    --
    Julian Vrieslander

  20. #20
    bob Guest

    Default Re: Spaghetti alla Puttanesca (was: Re: Anchovies)

    On Wed, 13 May 2009 22:56:07 -0700, Julian Vrieslander
    <[email protected]> shouted from the highest
    rooftop:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > zxcvbob <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I bought a can (2 ounces) of anchovies, and not sure how to use them.
    >> How many should I add to one pound of canned tomatoes to give them a
    >> "meaty" taste without being too fishy or salty? I'm going to sauté them
    >> in the olive oil until they dissolve before I add the tomatoes.


    <snip>

    Looks pretty much like the one I make, but these days I work in metric
    measurements cause that's how things like canned toms, etc are
    measured in New Zealand. It's my favourite salsa to make and eat.



    --

    una cerveza mas por favor ...

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~
    Wax-up and drop-in of Surfing's Golden Years: <http://www.surfwriter.net>
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~

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