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Thread: Anchovies

  1. #1
    Jay Guest

    Default Anchovies

    I bought a jar for the first time (previously had them from small
    tins). Used a couple in a salad and put the jar in the fridge (as per
    the label). 2 days later I go to get them out of the fridge and the
    liquid in the jar has turned into a mushy white mush!
    The ingredients are anchovies, olive oil and salt.
    Is this normal behaviour? Are they usable? Can it be prevented?


  2. #2
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    Jay <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I bought a jar for the first time (previously had them from small
    >tins). Used a couple in a salad and put the jar in the fridge (as per
    >the label). 2 days later I go to get them out of the fridge and the
    >liquid in the jar has turned into a mushy white mush!
    >The ingredients are anchovies, olive oil and salt.
    >Is this normal behaviour? Are they usable? Can it be prevented?


    Yeah, it's normal -- that is olive oil in the jar, which (at
    least in certain grades) is solid at refrigerator temperature
    (at least for some refrigerators).

    When I open a tin, I rinse off the oil and transfer to
    a new container. This is just for convenience, no problem
    to let it solidify instead, then scrape/rinse it away later.

    Steve

  3. #3
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    It is perfectly normal. As soon as they are returned to room temp or heated,
    they'll look like what you bought.

    --
    http://www.judithgreenwood.com
    "Jay" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]..
    >I bought a jar for the first time (previously had them from small
    > tins). Used a couple in a salad and put the jar in the fridge (as per
    > the label). 2 days later I go to get them out of the fridge and the
    > liquid in the jar has turned into a mushy white mush!
    > The ingredients are anchovies, olive oil and salt.
    > Is this normal behaviour? Are they usable? Can it be prevented?
    >




  4. #4
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    "Steve Pope" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:g90bbe$nu3$[email protected]..
    > Jay <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>I bought a jar for the first time (previously had them from small
    >>tins). Used a couple in a salad and put the jar in the fridge (as per
    >>the label). 2 days later I go to get them out of the fridge and the
    >>liquid in the jar has turned into a mushy white mush!
    >>The ingredients are anchovies, olive oil and salt.
    >>Is this normal behaviour? Are they usable? Can it be prevented?

    snippage
    > When I open a tin, I rinse off the oil and transfer to
    > a new container. This is just for convenience, no problem
    > to let it solidify instead, then scrape/rinse it away later.
    >
    > Steve


    Steve, for many of southern recipes, you need the oil and salt for the
    finished flavor of the dish. Ex: orecchiette ai broccoletti



  5. #5
    Jay Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    On Aug 26, 7:31*pm, "Giusi" <decobabe...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > "Steve Pope" <spop...@speedymail.org> ha scritto nel messaggionews:g90bbe$nu3$[email protected]..
    >
    > > Jay *<JazeM...@gmail.com> wrote:

    >
    > >>I bought a jar for the first time (previously had them from small
    > >>tins). Used a couple in a salad and put the jar in the fridge (as per
    > >>the label). 2 days later I go to get them out of the fridge and the
    > >>liquid in the jar has turned into a mushy white mush!
    > >>The ingredients are anchovies, olive oil and salt.
    > >>Is this normal behaviour? Are they usable? Can it be prevented?

    > snippage
    > > When I open a tin, I rinse off the oil and transfer to
    > > a new container. *This is just for convenience, no problem
    > > to let it solidify instead, then scrape/rinse it away later.

    >
    > > Steve

    >
    > Steve, for many of southern recipes, you need the oil and salt for the
    > finished flavor of the dish. *Ex: orecchiette ai broccoletti


    Thanks to all, you've set my mind at rest.
    Bit ugly when I'm trying to cut it up for a caeser salad.
    Never thought of rinsing it - thought I might rinse the flavour away

  6. #6
    George Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    Jay wrote:
    > On Aug 26, 7:31 pm, "Giusi" <decobabe...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >> "Steve Pope" <spop...@speedymail.org> ha scritto nel messaggionews:g90bbe$nu3$[email protected]..
    >>
    >>> Jay <JazeM...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >>>> I bought a jar for the first time (previously had them from small
    >>>> tins). Used a couple in a salad and put the jar in the fridge (as per
    >>>> the label). 2 days later I go to get them out of the fridge and the
    >>>> liquid in the jar has turned into a mushy white mush!
    >>>> The ingredients are anchovies, olive oil and salt.
    >>>> Is this normal behaviour? Are they usable? Can it be prevented?

    >> snippage
    >>> When I open a tin, I rinse off the oil and transfer to
    >>> a new container. This is just for convenience, no problem
    >>> to let it solidify instead, then scrape/rinse it away later.
    >>> Steve

    >> Steve, for many of southern recipes, you need the oil and salt for the
    >> finished flavor of the dish. Ex: orecchiette ai broccoletti

    >
    > Thanks to all, you've set my mind at rest.
    > Bit ugly when I'm trying to cut it up for a caeser salad.
    > Never thought of rinsing it - thought I might rinse the flavour away


    Just put them out to warm up a little while before you need them. All
    that happened is the oil became a solid.

  7. #7
    George Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    Steve Pope wrote:
    > Jay <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I bought a jar for the first time (previously had them from small
    >> tins). Used a couple in a salad and put the jar in the fridge (as per
    >> the label). 2 days later I go to get them out of the fridge and the
    >> liquid in the jar has turned into a mushy white mush!
    >> The ingredients are anchovies, olive oil and salt.
    >> Is this normal behaviour? Are they usable? Can it be prevented?

    >
    > Yeah, it's normal -- that is olive oil in the jar, which (at
    > least in certain grades) is solid at refrigerator temperature
    > (at least for some refrigerators).
    >
    > When I open a tin, I rinse off the oil and transfer to
    > a new container. This is just for convenience, no problem
    > to let it solidify instead, then scrape/rinse it away later.
    >
    > Steve


    Can I suggest that you are loosing a lot of the flavor that has
    dissolved in the oil? If you store partial contents in the fridge just
    let them warm up a little and the oil will quickly liquefy.

  8. #8
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    Giusi <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Steve Pope" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio


    >> When I open a tin, I rinse off the oil and transfer to
    >> a new container. This is just for convenience, no problem
    >> to let it solidify instead, then scrape/rinse it away later.


    >Steve, for many of southern recipes, you need the oil and salt for the
    >finished flavor of the dish. Ex: orecchiette ai broccoletti


    Sure, go for it if you want anchovie tin fluid in your
    dish. I generally discard it, and rinse some of the
    salt off (but I don't go the next step of soaking the
    anchovies, which removes most of the salt).

    I normally use anochovies for pasta puttanesca, or Caesar
    salads. Sometimes -- once per decade -- I make anchovie
    butter for serving atop of steak or lamb. No anchovie
    juice required for these purposes.

    Steve

  9. #9
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    George <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Steve Pope wrote:


    >> When I open a tin, I rinse off the oil and transfer to
    >> a new container. This is just for convenience, no problem
    >> to let it solidify instead, then scrape/rinse it away later.


    >Can I suggest that you are loosing a lot of the flavor that has
    >dissolved in the oil?


    Yes, but you can compensate by using more anchovies to
    begin with.

    Steve

  10. #10
    Blinky the Shark Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    Steve Pope wrote:

    > George <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Steve Pope wrote:

    >
    >>> When I open a tin, I rinse off the oil and transfer to
    >>> a new container. This is just for convenience, no problem
    >>> to let it solidify instead, then scrape/rinse it away later.

    >
    >>Can I suggest that you are loosing a lot of the flavor that has
    >>dissolved in the oil?

    >
    > Yes, but you can compensate by using more anchovies to
    > begin with.


    Or he could just tight the oil that's been loosed.

    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org
    Need a new news feed? http://blinkynet.net/comp/newfeed.html


  11. #11
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    Steve Pope wrote:
    > Giusi <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> "Steve Pope" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio

    >
    >>> When I open a tin, I rinse off the oil and transfer to
    >>> a new container. This is just for convenience, no problem
    >>> to let it solidify instead, then scrape/rinse it away later.

    >
    >> Steve, for many of southern recipes, you need the oil and salt for
    >> the finished flavor of the dish. Ex: orecchiette ai broccoletti

    >
    > Sure, go for it if you want anchovie tin fluid in your
    > dish.


    The OP said he bought it in a jar.

    Jill

  12. #12
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    jmcquown <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Steve Pope wrote:


    >> Giusi <[email protected]> wrote:


    >>> "Steve Pope" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio


    >>>> When I open a tin, I rinse off the oil and transfer to
    >>>> a new container. This is just for convenience, no problem
    >>>> to let it solidify instead, then scrape/rinse it away later.


    >>> Steve, for many of southern recipes, you need the oil and salt for
    >>> the finished flavor of the dish. Ex: orecchiette ai broccoletti


    >> Sure, go for it if you want anchovie tin fluid in your
    >> dish.


    >The OP said he bought it in a jar.


    Yes, certainly. There was thread drift, to tins.

    Steve

  13. #13
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    Steve Pope wrote:
    > jmcquown <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Steve Pope wrote:

    >
    >>> Giusi <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >>>> "Steve Pope" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio

    >
    >>>>> When I open a tin, I rinse off the oil and transfer to
    >>>>> a new container. This is just for convenience, no problem
    >>>>> to let it solidify instead, then scrape/rinse it away later.

    >
    >>>> Steve, for many of southern recipes, you need the oil and salt for
    >>>> the finished flavor of the dish. Ex: orecchiette ai broccoletti

    >
    >>> Sure, go for it if you want anchovie tin fluid in your
    >>> dish.

    >
    >> The OP said he bought it in a jar.

    >
    > Yes, certainly. There was thread drift, to tins.
    >
    > Steve


    I know Copacetic

  14. #14
    none Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    Steve Pope wrote:
    > Jay <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I bought a jar for the first time (previously had them from small
    >> tins). Used a couple in a salad and put the jar in the fridge (as per
    >> the label). 2 days later I go to get them out of the fridge and the
    >> liquid in the jar has turned into a mushy white mush!
    >> The ingredients are anchovies, olive oil and salt.
    >> Is this normal behaviour? Are they usable? Can it be prevented?

    >
    > Yeah, it's normal -- that is olive oil in the jar, which (at
    > least in certain grades) is solid at refrigerator temperature
    > (at least for some refrigerators).
    >
    > When I open a tin, I rinse off the oil and transfer to
    > a new container. This is just for convenience, no problem
    > to let it solidify instead, then scrape/rinse it away later.
    >
    > Steve


    I guess you could just let the jar warm enough to melt the solidified
    olive oil before using the anchovies..? It shouldn't take long.
    If you are daring and adventurous, and enjoy fishing with dynamite, you
    could put the jar in the microwave oven for 10 seconds or so.

  15. #15
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    On 2008-08-26, Jay <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The ingredients are anchovies, olive oil and salt.
    > Is this normal behaviour? Are they usable? Can it be prevented?


    Yeah. Oil in cold gets funky.

    Look for salt-packed anchovies. Hard to find, but so superior to anything
    in oil.

    nb

  16. #16
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    "none" <""Mark\"@(none)"> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]..
    > Steve Pope wrote:
    >> Jay <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I bought a jar for the first time (previously had them from small
    >>> tins). Used a couple in a salad and put the jar in the fridge (as per
    >>> the label). 2 days later I go to get them out of the fridge and the
    >>> liquid in the jar has turned into a mushy white mush!

    >> Yeah, it's normal -- that is olive oil in the jar, which (at
    >> least in certain grades) is solid at refrigerator temperature
    >> (at least for some refrigerators).
    >>
    >> When I open a tin, I rinse off the oil and transfer to
    >> a new container. This is just for convenience, no problem
    >> to let it solidify instead, then scrape/rinse it away later.
    >>
    >> Steve

    >
    > I guess you could just let the jar warm enough to melt the solidified
    > olive oil before using the anchovies..? It shouldn't take long.
    > If you are daring and adventurous, and enjoy fishing with dynamite, you
    > could put the jar in the microwave oven for 10 seconds or so.


    None of that is necessary. You need to leave the anchovies you aren't using
    in the oil and salt that are preseving them. Don't heat them until you are
    using them. These bottles are not cheap, but they will happily sit in the
    fridge door for months as you use the anchovies filet by filet, which opened
    tins will not.
    Remove the amount you need and within moments it will be as you expect it to
    be. If cooking with them, toss them into the pan and they will dissolve and
    disappear just like any other anchovy.



  17. #17
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    "notbob" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]..
    > On 2008-08-26, Jay <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> The ingredients are anchovies, olive oil and salt.
    >> Is this normal behaviour? Are they usable? Can it be prevented?

    >
    > Yeah. Oil in cold gets funky.
    >
    > Look for salt-packed anchovies. Hard to find, but so superior to anything
    > in oil.
    >
    > nb


    I disagree. There is a reason to use one or the other depending on the
    recipe. If the recipe can use either it will say so and tell you what to do
    with the ones you plan to use.

    This is like that arritude that fresh egg pasta is always better than dried
    pasta. It's two different things, each good at what it does.



  18. #18
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    Giusi wrote on Wed, 27 Aug 2008 08:50:41 +0200:

    > "notbob" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> On 2008-08-26, Jay <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> The ingredients are anchovies, olive oil and salt.
    >>> Is this normal behaviour? Are they usable? Can it be
    >>> prevented?

    >>
    >> Yeah. Oil in cold gets funky.
    >>
    >> Look for salt-packed anchovies. Hard to find, but so
    >> superior to anything in oil.
    >>
    >> nb


    > I disagree. There is a reason to use one or the other
    > depending on the recipe. If the recipe can use either it will
    > say so and tell you what to do with the ones you plan to use.


    Watching this thread, I get the impression that many people like the
    taste of anchovies. I only like them as a contribution to an overall
    flavor and I can't stand them on pizza.

    Anchovies are not as bad as Vietnamese fish sauce, Nuoc Mam. I once
    tried it by itself but never again. I had to use mouthwash and a strong
    drink to get rid of the quintessentially fishy taste. However, at the
    right concentration, fish sauce also improves overall flavor and works
    in dipping sauces.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  19. #19
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    On Sat, 18 Oct 2008 21:18:08 GMT, "James Silverton"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Anchovies are not as bad as Vietnamese fish sauce, Nuoc Mam. I once
    >tried it by itself but never again. I had to use mouthwash and a strong
    >drink to get rid of the quintessentially fishy taste. However, at the
    >right concentration, fish sauce also improves overall flavor and works
    >in dipping sauces.


    Guess you found out the hard way that it's not like soy. I like it,
    but I'd never think of it for dipping or eating plain. It's a great
    accent to a bigger recipe.


    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that
    interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

  20. #20
    PeterLucas Guest

    Default Re: Anchovies

    "James Silverton" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:kosKk.2000$[email protected]:


    >> I disagree. There is a reason to use one or the other
    >> depending on the recipe. If the recipe can use either it will
    >> say so and tell you what to do with the ones you plan to use.

    >
    > Watching this thread, I get the impression that many people like the
    > taste of anchovies. I only like them as a contribution to an overall
    > flavor and I can't stand them on pizza.



    I'm just about to try some 'White Anchovies'. A mate of mine is anchovie
    mad and has found some somewhere!!


    But for your usual run of the mill tinned or bottled anchovies, try
    putting the lot in a saucepan over moderate heat, stirring all the
    while. The fish will melt down to a sauce and lose that 'hairy-fish'
    taste, and it's quite lovely when used in gravies or casseroles etc.


    >
    > Anchovies are not as bad as Vietnamese fish sauce, Nuoc Mam. I once
    > tried it by itself but never again. I had to use mouthwash and a

    strong
    > drink to get rid of the quintessentially fishy taste. However, at the
    > right concentration, fish sauce also improves overall flavor and works
    > in dipping sauces.
    >



    Fish sauce is *never* used by itself!! Usually used with several other
    ingredients in a dipping sauce, or added to a curry at the end for a bit
    of a flavour hit.

    Fish sauce is often made with anchovies and is made by leaving large
    quantities of fish to ferment in salt, and straining off the 'juice' :-)

    http://importfood.com/how_fish_sauce_is_made.html

    http://www.thaifoodandtravel.com/fea...ishsauce1.html

    "In case you are not yet familiar with fish sauce, it is that salty,
    smelly brown liquid made from fish that is the single, most important
    flavoring ingredient in Thai cooking (also well-loved in Laos, Cambodia,
    Vietnam, Burma and the Philippines). Used like salt in western cooking
    and soy sauce in Chinese cooking, good-quality fish sauce imparts a
    distinct aroma and flavor all its own. It is indispensable in the Thai
    kitchen as Thai food wouldn't be quite the same without it.

    Called "nam bplah" in Thai, or literally "fish water," genuine fish
    sauce is the water, or juice, in the flesh of fish that is extracted in
    the process of prolonged salting and fermentation. It is made from small
    fish that would otherwise have little value for consumption. This can
    either be freshwater or saltwater fish, though today, most fish sauce is
    made from the latter as pollution and dams have drastically reduced the
    once plentiful supply of freshwater fish in the heartlands of Southeast
    Asia.

    Among marine fish, anchovies and related species of small schooling fish
    from two to five inches in length are commonly used, as they can be
    found in bountiful supply in the coastal waters of the Gulf of Thailand
    and the South China Sea. Larger varieties of fish, such as mackerel and
    sardines, also make good fish sauce, but because they are relatively
    more expensive due to their value as a food fish, they are seldom used
    in the commercial production of fish sauce.

    For fish sauce to develop a pleasant, fragrant aroma and taste, the fish
    must be very fresh. As soon as fishing boats return with their catch,
    the fish are rinsed and drained, then mixed with sea salt two to three
    parts fish to one part salt by weight. They are then filled into large
    earthenware jars, lined on the bottom with a layer of salt, and topped
    with a layer of salt. A woven bamboo mat is placed over the fish and
    weighted down with heavy rocks to keep the fish from floating when water
    inside them are extracted out by the salt and fermentation process.

    The jars are covered and left in a sunny location for nine months to a
    year. From time to time, they are uncovered to air out and to let the
    fish be exposed to direct, hot sunshine, which helps "digest" the fish
    and turn them into fluid. The periodic "sunning" produces a fish sauce
    of superior quality, giving it a fragrant aroma and a clear, reddish
    brown color.

    After enough months have passed, the liquid is removed from the jars,
    preferably through a spigot on the bottom of the jars, so that it passes
    through the layers of fish remains; or by siphoning. Any sediments are
    strained out with a clean cloth. The filtered fish sauce is filled into
    other clean jars and allowed to air out in the sun for a couple of weeks
    to dissipate the strong fish odors. It is then ready for bottling. The
    finished product is 100-percent, top-grade, genuine fish sauce. "

    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia


    If we are not meant to eat animals,
    why are they made of meat?

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