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Thread: Ancho chiles/Enchiladas

  1. #1
    Saerah Gray Guest

    Default Ancho chiles/Enchiladas


    I have not used these in a long, long time. These aren't *that* hot, right?
    (I am also using a minced fresh poblano. I think it is my favorite chile
    pepper!) I am making enchiladas later, and I am using them for the sauce.
    (koko's recently posted recipe)

    Ellie likes spicy things, but not things that are really spicy. Will the
    cooking gods hate me if I end up adding some tomatoes to make it milder if
    it ends up spicier than she'll like?

    --
    Saerah

    "Welcome to Usenet, Biatch! Adapt or haul ass!"
    - some hillbilly from FL

  2. #2
    koko Guest

    Default Re: Ancho chiles/Enchiladas

    On Sat, 27 Sep 2008 13:27:44 GMT, Saerah Gray <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >I have not used these in a long, long time. These aren't *that* hot, right?
    >(I am also using a minced fresh poblano. I think it is my favorite chile
    >pepper!) I am making enchiladas later, and I am using them for the sauce.
    >(koko's recently posted recipe)
    >
    >Ellie likes spicy things, but not things that are really spicy. Will the
    >cooking gods hate me if I end up adding some tomatoes to make it milder if
    >it ends up spicier than she'll like?


    The ancho chili is a dried poblano and is a mild chili.
    http://www.foodsubs.com/Chiledry.html

    I've heard of tomato products being used in enchilada sauce and as far
    as I know everyone's lived to tell about it. ;-)

    Please give Ellie a big hug and kiss from me.
    Maybe her leotard fell behind the dresser.

    koko
    There is no love more sincere than the love of food
    George Bernard Shaw
    www.kokoscorner.typepad.com
    updated 9/26

  3. #3
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Ancho chiles/Enchiladas

    Saerah Gray <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I have not used these in a long, long time. These aren't *that* hot, right?
    >(I am also using a minced fresh poblano. I think it is my favorite chile
    >pepper!) I am making enchiladas later, and I am using them for the sauce.
    >(koko's recently posted recipe)


    >Ellie likes spicy things, but not things that are really spicy. Will the
    >cooking gods hate me if I end up adding some tomatoes to make it milder if
    >it ends up spicier than she'll like?


    Anchos are milder than (almost any) New Mexico chili, so yes you will
    end up with a mild enchilada sauce.

    I don't think there's much wrong with adding a fraction of
    tomato or tomato product to an enchilada sauce, so long as it
    does not dominate.

    Steve

  4. #4
    Saerah Gray Guest

    Default Re: Ancho chiles/Enchiladas

    koko <[email protected]> fnord
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Sat, 27 Sep 2008 13:27:44 GMT, Saerah Gray <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>I have not used these in a long, long time. These aren't *that* hot,
    >>right? (I am also using a minced fresh poblano. I think it is my
    >>favorite chile pepper!) I am making enchiladas later, and I am using
    >>them for the sauce. (koko's recently posted recipe)
    >>
    >>Ellie likes spicy things, but not things that are really spicy. Will
    >>the cooking gods hate me if I end up adding some tomatoes to make it
    >>milder if it ends up spicier than she'll like?

    >
    > The ancho chili is a dried poblano and is a mild chili.
    > http://www.foodsubs.com/Chiledry.html
    >


    Yeah, I knew it was a dried poblano; I just ddidn't know how spicy the
    dried ones were (dumb, I know)

    > I've heard of tomato products being used in enchilada sauce and as far
    > as I know everyone's lived to tell about it. ;-)
    >


    The sauce is made. It is tres awesome (I ended up using a can of
    tomatoes, but that made it a red sauce instead of a brown one :>)

    > Please give Ellie a big hug and kiss from me.
    > Maybe her leotard fell behind the dresser.



    I still couldn't find it. Oh well, now she has a pink one. She's happy


    --
    Saerah

    "Welcome to Usenet, Biatch! Adapt or haul ass!"
    - some hillbilly from FL

  5. #5
    Saerah Gray Guest

    Default Re: Ancho chiles/Enchiladas

    [email protected] (Steve Pope) fnord
    news:gbm0l2$j5f$[email protected]:

    > Saerah Gray <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>I have not used these in a long, long time. These aren't *that* hot,
    >>right? (I am also using a minced fresh poblano. I think it is my
    >>favorite chile pepper!) I am making enchiladas later, and I am using
    >>them for the sauce. (koko's recently posted recipe)

    >
    >>Ellie likes spicy things, but not things that are really spicy. Will
    >>the cooking gods hate me if I end up adding some tomatoes to make it
    >>milder if it ends up spicier than she'll like?

    >
    > Anchos are milder than (almost any) New Mexico chili, so yes you will
    > end up with a mild enchilada sauce.
    >


    I have some dried guajillos, too, but I'm saving them for something
    else. (chocolate mole, whenever I get around to it.)

    The things you can find at Aldi are often surprising!

    > I don't think there's much wrong with adding a fraction of
    > tomato or tomato product to an enchilada sauce, so long as it
    > does not dominate.
    >


    Yeah, I have used the bottled stuff, and it is way too "spicy tomato
    sauce" for my tastes.

    When I make things from scratch for the first time, I like them to be
    "authentic", or at least close to it.

    --
    Saerah

    "Welcome to Usenet, Biatch! Adapt or haul ass!"
    - some hillbilly from FL

  6. #6
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Ancho chiles/Enchiladas


    "Saerah Gray" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] 50...
    >
    > I have not used these in a long, long time. These aren't *that* hot,
    > right?
    > (I am also using a minced fresh poblano. I think it is my favorite chile
    > pepper!) I am making enchiladas later, and I am using them for the sauce.
    > (koko's recently posted recipe)
    >
    > Ellie likes spicy things, but not things that are really spicy. Will the
    > cooking gods hate me if I end up adding some tomatoes to make it milder if
    > it ends up spicier than she'll like?



    Anchos have almost no heat at all, quite sweet actually. You'll find many
    paprikas and chili powders have more spice than an ancho. They'll add a
    whole lot of flavor but no spice. You can always make a half batch of
    enchiladas with jalapenos or chipotles if you prefer something hotter.

    Paul



  7. #7
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Ancho chiles/Enchiladas


    "koko" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Sat, 27 Sep 2008 13:27:44 GMT, Saerah Gray <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>I have not used these in a long, long time. These aren't *that* hot,
    >>right?
    >>(I am also using a minced fresh poblano. I think it is my favorite chile
    >>pepper!) I am making enchiladas later, and I am using them for the sauce.
    >>(koko's recently posted recipe)
    >>
    >>Ellie likes spicy things, but not things that are really spicy. Will the
    >>cooking gods hate me if I end up adding some tomatoes to make it milder if
    >>it ends up spicier than she'll like?

    >
    > The ancho chili is a dried poblano and is a mild chili.
    > http://www.foodsubs.com/Chiledry.html
    >
    > I've heard of tomato products being used in enchilada sauce and as far
    > as I know everyone's lived to tell about it. ;-)
    >
    > Please give Ellie a big hug and kiss from me.
    > Maybe her leotard fell behind the dresser.
    >
    > koko
    > There is no love more sincere than the love of food
    > George Bernard Shaw
    > www.kokoscorner.typepad.com
    > updated 9/26


    Here is the actual scolville scale

    You can see where the Ancho and Poblano range.

    Dimitri

    pepper Type Heat rating (in Scoville heat
    units)
    Habanero 200,000-300,000
    Red Amazon 75,000
    Pequin 75,000
    Chiltecepin 70,000-75,000
    Tabasco 30,00-50,000
    Cayenne 35,000
    Arbol 25,000
    Japone 25,000
    Smoked Jalepeno (Chipotle) 10,000
    Serrano 7,000-25,000
    Puya 5,000
    Guajillo 5,000
    Jalepeno 3,500-4,500
    Poblano 2,500-3,000
    Pasilla 2,500
    TAM Mild Jalepeno- 11,000-1,500
    Anaheim 1,000-1,400
    New Mexican 1,000
    Ancho 1,000
    Bell & Pimento 0


  8. #8
    koko Guest

    Default Re: Ancho chiles/Enchiladas

    On Sat, 27 Sep 2008 19:53:53 GMT, Saerah Gray <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >koko <[email protected]> fnord
    >news:[email protected] :
    >
    >> On Sat, 27 Sep 2008 13:27:44 GMT, Saerah Gray <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>I have not used these in a long, long time. These aren't *that* hot,
    >>>right? (I am also using a minced fresh poblano. I think it is my
    >>>favorite chile pepper!) I am making enchiladas later, and I am using
    >>>them for the sauce. (koko's recently posted recipe)
    >>>
    >>>Ellie likes spicy things, but not things that are really spicy. Will
    >>>the cooking gods hate me if I end up adding some tomatoes to make it
    >>>milder if it ends up spicier than she'll like?

    >>
    >> The ancho chili is a dried poblano and is a mild chili.
    >> http://www.foodsubs.com/Chiledry.html
    >>

    >
    >Yeah, I knew it was a dried poblano; I just ddidn't know how spicy the
    >dried ones were (dumb, I know)
    >

    No, not in the least. I thought they were mild but I still had to look
    it up. You got me wondering if I remembered right.

    >> I've heard of tomato products being used in enchilada sauce and as far
    >> as I know everyone's lived to tell about it. ;-)
    >>

    >
    >The sauce is made. It is tres awesome (I ended up using a can of
    >tomatoes, but that made it a red sauce instead of a brown one :>)


    Great as long as it was tasty, that's all that matters.


    >> Please give Ellie a big hug and kiss from me.
    >> Maybe her leotard fell behind the dresser.

    >
    >
    >I still couldn't find it. Oh well, now she has a pink one. She's happy
    >


    Oh, how you bring back memories of when I was raising my daughter
    alone.

    koko
    There is no love more sincere than the love of food
    George Bernard Shaw
    www.kokoscorner.typepad.com
    updated 9/26

  9. #9
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: Ancho chiles/Enchiladas

    On Sat, 27 Sep 2008 19:56:06 GMT, Saerah Gray <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >[email protected] (Steve Pope) fnord
    >news:gbm0l2$j5f$[email protected]:
    >
    >> Saerah Gray <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I have not used these in a long, long time. These aren't *that* hot,
    >>>right? (I am also using a minced fresh poblano. I think it is my
    >>>favorite chile pepper!) I am making enchiladas later, and I am using
    >>>them for the sauce. (koko's recently posted recipe)

    >>
    >>>Ellie likes spicy things, but not things that are really spicy. Will
    >>>the cooking gods hate me if I end up adding some tomatoes to make it
    >>>milder if it ends up spicier than she'll like?

    >>
    >> Anchos are milder than (almost any) New Mexico chili, so yes you will
    >> end up with a mild enchilada sauce.
    >>

    >
    >I have some dried guajillos, too, but I'm saving them for something
    >else. (chocolate mole, whenever I get around to it.)
    >
    >The things you can find at Aldi are often surprising!
    >
    >> I don't think there's much wrong with adding a fraction of
    >> tomato or tomato product to an enchilada sauce, so long as it
    >> does not dominate.
    >>

    >
    >Yeah, I have used the bottled stuff, and it is way too "spicy tomato
    >sauce" for my tastes.
    >
    >When I make things from scratch for the first time, I like them to be
    >"authentic", or at least close to it.


    Here's a thread on enchiladas from 6 years ago that authenticity comes
    up in. I made enchiladas a few weeks ago and googled the group. I
    used bits and pieces from a few of the recipes and was very pleased
    with the results. I did use tomatoes.

    http://tinyurl.com/4vj4fw

    Lou

  10. #10
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Ancho chiles/Enchiladas

    On Sat, 27 Sep 2008 13:30:46 -0700, Dimitri wrote:
    >
    > Here is the actual scolville scale
    >
    > You can see where the Ancho and Poblano range.
    >
    > Dimitri
    >
    > pepper Type Heat rating (in Scoville heat
    > units)


    > Smoked Jalepeno (Chipotle) 10,000


    > Jalepeno 3,500-4,500


    i wonder why smoking would double or almost triple the scoville units?
    shrinkage? i don't recall seeing dried jalapeņos other than chipotles.

    your pal,
    blake

  11. #11
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Ancho chiles/Enchiladas


    "blake murphy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:l1pmeha2oenj.12n2o9h3aqp6j$.[email protected]..
    > On Sat, 27 Sep 2008 13:30:46 -0700, Dimitri wrote:
    >>
    >> Here is the actual scolville scale
    >>
    >> You can see where the Ancho and Poblano range.
    >>
    >> Dimitri
    >>
    >> pepper Type Heat rating (in Scoville
    >> heat
    >> units)

    >
    >> Smoked Jalepeno (Chipotle) 10,000

    >
    >> Jalepeno 3,500-4,500

    >
    > i wonder why smoking would double or almost triple the scoville units?
    > shrinkage? i don't recall seeing dried jalapeņos other than chipotles.
    >
    > your pal,
    > blake


    I was looking at that myself - I suppose the scoville units are a ratio of
    capsicum to the flesh. I believe the smoking process reduces the amount of
    "flesh" by removing moisture there be increasing the scoville ratio.

    I would think that's how it works.

    Dimitri


  12. #12
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: Ancho chiles/Enchiladas

    In article <l1pmeha2oenj.12n2o9h3aqp6j$.[email protected]>,
    blake murphy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sat, 27 Sep 2008 13:30:46 -0700, Dimitri wrote:
    > >
    > > Here is the actual scolville scale
    > >
    > > You can see where the Ancho and Poblano range.
    > >
    > > Dimitri
    > >
    > > pepper Type Heat rating (in Scoville
    > > heat
    > > units)

    >
    > > Smoked Jalepeno (Chipotle) 10,000

    >
    > > Jalepeno 3,500-4,500

    >
    > i wonder why smoking would double or almost triple the scoville units?
    > shrinkage? i don't recall seeing dried jalapeņos other than chipotles.



    Penzeys sells dried, crushed jalepeno:

    http://www.penzeys.com/cgi-bin/penze...sjalapeno.html

    They claim a heat level of 55,000.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  13. #13
    Mike Guest

    Default Re: Ancho chiles/Enchiladas


    "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:XuRDk.1913$[email protected]..
    >
    > "blake murphy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:l1pmeha2oenj.12n2o9h3aqp6j$.[email protected]..
    >> On Sat, 27 Sep 2008 13:30:46 -0700, Dimitri wrote:
    >>>
    >>> Here is the actual scolville scale
    >>>
    >>> You can see where the Ancho and Poblano range.
    >>>
    >>> Dimitri
    >>>
    >>> pepper Type Heat rating (in Scoville
    >>> heat
    >>> units)

    >>
    >>> Smoked Jalepeno (Chipotle) 10,000

    >>
    >>> Jalepeno
    >>> 3,500-4,500

    >>
    >> i wonder why smoking would double or almost triple the scoville units?
    >> shrinkage? i don't recall seeing dried jalapeņos other than chipotles.
    >>
    >> your pal,
    >> blake

    >
    > I was looking at that myself - I suppose the scoville units are a ratio of
    > capsicum to the flesh. I believe the smoking process reduces the amount
    > of "flesh" by removing moisture there be increasing the scoville ratio.
    >
    > I would think that's how it works.
    >
    > Dimitri


    It concentrates the heat in the pepper.
    Heat also seems to make peppers get hotter.
    I smoked some Habaneros last fall and they were blazing hot.. I added a
    smoked Habby to a jar of canned smoked salmon and pressure cooked it.
    the Habby put a hurting on my guts the next morning.



  14. #14
    Saerah Gray Guest

    Default Re: Ancho chiles/Enchiladas

    "Paul M. Cook" <[email protected]> fnord
    news:gbm3oi$684$[email protected]:

    >
    > "Saerah Gray" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected] 50...
    >>
    >> I have not used these in a long, long time. These aren't *that* hot,
    >> right?
    >> (I am also using a minced fresh poblano. I think it is my favorite
    >> chile pepper!) I am making enchiladas later, and I am using them for
    >> the sauce. (koko's recently posted recipe)
    >>
    >> Ellie likes spicy things, but not things that are really spicy. Will
    >> the cooking gods hate me if I end up adding some tomatoes to make it
    >> milder if it ends up spicier than she'll like?

    >
    >
    > Anchos have almost no heat at all, quite sweet actually. You'll find
    > many paprikas and chili powders have more spice than an ancho.
    > They'll add a whole lot of flavor but no spice. You can always make a
    > half batch of enchiladas with jalapenos or chipotles if you prefer
    > something hotter.
    >
    > Paul
    >
    >
    >


    They ended up being not spicy enough for my friend and I, but Ellie
    liked them (and thought it was "hot" )

    --
    Saerah

    "Welcome to Usenet, Biatch! Adapt or haul ass!"
    - some hillbilly from FL

  15. #15
    Saerah Gray Guest

    Default Re: Ancho chiles/Enchiladas

    koko <[email protected]> fnord news:qgctd41hr3idmm1e4r7t18rc9fvmd4dsou@
    4ax.com:

    > Great as long as it was tasty, that's all that matters.
    >


    Oh, it was. Pics in abf later.

    >
    >>> Please give Ellie a big hug and kiss from me.
    >>> Maybe her leotard fell behind the dresser.

    >>
    >>
    >>I still couldn't find it. Oh well, now she has a pink one. She's happy
    >>

    >
    > Oh, how you bring back memories of when I was raising my daughter
    > alone.


    Maybe I will have fond memories of exhaustion when I am older


    --
    Saerah

    "Welcome to Usenet, Biatch! Adapt or haul ass!"
    - some hillbilly from FL

  16. #16
    Saerah Gray Guest

    Default Re: Ancho chiles/Enchiladas

    Lou Decruss <[email protected]> fnord
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Sat, 27 Sep 2008 19:56:06 GMT, Saerah Gray <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>[email protected] (Steve Pope) fnord
    >>news:gbm0l2$j5f$[email protected]:
    >>
    >>> Saerah Gray <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>I have not used these in a long, long time. These aren't *that* hot,
    >>>>right? (I am also using a minced fresh poblano. I think it is my
    >>>>favorite chile pepper!) I am making enchiladas later, and I am using
    >>>>them for the sauce. (koko's recently posted recipe)
    >>>
    >>>>Ellie likes spicy things, but not things that are really spicy. Will
    >>>>the cooking gods hate me if I end up adding some tomatoes to make it
    >>>>milder if it ends up spicier than she'll like?
    >>>
    >>> Anchos are milder than (almost any) New Mexico chili, so yes you

    will
    >>> end up with a mild enchilada sauce.
    >>>

    >>
    >>I have some dried guajillos, too, but I'm saving them for something
    >>else. (chocolate mole, whenever I get around to it.)
    >>
    >>The things you can find at Aldi are often surprising!
    >>
    >>> I don't think there's much wrong with adding a fraction of
    >>> tomato or tomato product to an enchilada sauce, so long as it
    >>> does not dominate.
    >>>

    >>
    >>Yeah, I have used the bottled stuff, and it is way too "spicy tomato
    >>sauce" for my tastes.
    >>
    >>When I make things from scratch for the first time, I like them to be
    >>"authentic", or at least close to it.

    >
    > Here's a thread on enchiladas from 6 years ago that authenticity comes
    > up in. I made enchiladas a few weeks ago and googled the group. I
    > used bits and pieces from a few of the recipes and was very pleased
    > with the results. I did use tomatoes.
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/4vj4fw
    >
    > Lou


    I really like the way the dried chilies make it a chili sauce with
    tomatoes, more than tomato sauce with chilies, you know?

    --
    Saerah

    "Welcome to Usenet, Biatch! Adapt or haul ass!"
    - some hillbilly from FL

  17. #17
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Ancho chiles/Enchiladas

    On Sun, 28 Sep 2008 17:58:43 -0700, Mike wrote:

    > "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:XuRDk.1913$[email protected]..
    >>
    >> "blake murphy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:l1pmeha2oenj.12n2o9h3aqp6j$.[email protected]..
    >>> On Sat, 27 Sep 2008 13:30:46 -0700, Dimitri wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> Here is the actual scolville scale
    >>>>
    >>>> You can see where the Ancho and Poblano range.
    >>>>
    >>>> Dimitri
    >>>>
    >>>> pepper Type Heat rating (in Scoville
    >>>> heat
    >>>> units)
    >>>
    >>>> Smoked Jalepeno (Chipotle) 10,000
    >>>
    >>>> Jalepeno
    >>>> 3,500-4,500
    >>>
    >>> i wonder why smoking would double or almost triple the scoville units?
    >>> shrinkage? i don't recall seeing dried jalapeņos other than chipotles.
    >>>
    >>> your pal,
    >>> blake

    >>
    >> I was looking at that myself - I suppose the scoville units are a ratio of
    >> capsicum to the flesh. I believe the smoking process reduces the amount
    >> of "flesh" by removing moisture there be increasing the scoville ratio.
    >>
    >> I would think that's how it works.
    >>
    >> Dimitri

    >
    > It concentrates the heat in the pepper.
    > Heat also seems to make peppers get hotter.
    > I smoked some Habaneros last fall and they were blazing hot.. I added a
    > smoked Habby to a jar of canned smoked salmon and pressure cooked it.
    > the Habby put a hurting on my guts the next morning.


    so there is a heat factor in addition to the shrinkage (i.e., more bounce
    to the ounce)?

    your pal,
    blake

  18. #18
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Ancho chiles/Enchiladas

    On Sun, 28 Sep 2008 14:07:35 -0700, Dan Abel wrote:

    > In article <l1pmeha2oenj.12n2o9h3aqp6j$.[email protected]>,
    > blake murphy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 27 Sep 2008 13:30:46 -0700, Dimitri wrote:
    >>>
    >>> Here is the actual scolville scale
    >>>
    >>> You can see where the Ancho and Poblano range.
    >>>
    >>> Dimitri
    >>>
    >>> pepper Type Heat rating (in Scoville
    >>> heat
    >>> units)

    >>
    >>> Smoked Jalepeno (Chipotle) 10,000

    >>
    >>> Jalepeno 3,500-4,500

    >>
    >> i wonder why smoking would double or almost triple the scoville units?
    >> shrinkage? i don't recall seeing dried jalapeņos other than chipotles.

    >
    >
    > Penzeys sells dried, crushed jalepeno:
    >
    > http://www.penzeys.com/cgi-bin/penze...sjalapeno.html
    >
    > They claim a heat level of 55,000.


    jeez, more then ten times as hot as fresh? this is really puzzling.

    your pal,
    blake



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