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Thread: "American cloth"

  1. #1
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default "American cloth"

    Brit: A sturdy enameled oilcloth.

  2. #2
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: "American cloth"

    spamtrap1888 <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Brit: A sturdy enameled oilcloth.


    How does one put enamel on oilcloth?



  3. #3
    sf Guest

    Default Re: "American cloth"

    On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 15:11:44 -0700 (PDT), spamtrap1888
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Brit: A sturdy enameled oilcloth.


    I know what enamel is and I know what oilcloth is, but what the heck
    is *enameled* oilcloth?

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  4. #4
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: "American cloth"

    sf wrote:
    > On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 15:11:44 -0700 (PDT), spamtrap1888
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Brit: A sturdy enameled oilcloth.

    >
    > I know what enamel is and I know what oilcloth is, but what the heck
    > is *enameled* oilcloth?


    http://thesewingacademy.org/index.php?topic=8061.0



  5. #5
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: "American cloth"

    On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 17:54:17 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >spamtrap1888 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Brit: A sturdy enameled oilcloth.

    >
    >How does one put enamel on oilcloth?
    >


    With a brush? Great floor cover- or tablecloth. [I've had the
    former, don't remember the latter, but the pictures look familiar]
    http://www.curbly.com/users/modhomee...how-to-make-it

    Jim

  6. #6
    sf Guest

    Default Re: "American cloth"

    On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 23:05:17 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > sf wrote:
    > > On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 15:11:44 -0700 (PDT), spamtrap1888
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Brit: A sturdy enameled oilcloth.

    > >
    > > I know what enamel is and I know what oilcloth is, but what the heck
    > > is *enameled* oilcloth?

    >
    > http://thesewingacademy.org/index.php?topic=8061.0
    >

    Thanks, I think. I'm still not visualizing it and still can't imagine
    how it is used or even why it would be a topic here.

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  7. #7
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: "American cloth"

    On Wednesday, October 10, 2012 6:11:44 PM UTC-4, spamtrap1888 wrote:
    > Brit: A sturdy enameled oilcloth.


    Who the **** cares?

  8. #8
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: "American cloth"

    On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 07:04:23 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 23:05:17 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> sf wrote:
    >> > On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 15:11:44 -0700 (PDT), spamtrap1888
    >> > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> Brit: A sturdy enameled oilcloth.
    >> >
    >> > I know what enamel is and I know what oilcloth is, but what the heck
    >> > is *enameled* oilcloth?

    >>
    >> http://thesewingacademy.org/index.php?topic=8061.0
    >>

    >Thanks, I think. I'm still not visualizing it and still can't imagine
    >how it is used or even why it would be a topic here.


    I don't know why it is here, but what about fabric for tents? Many
    communities in the west started out as tent cities.

  9. #9
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: "American cloth"

    On Oct 11, 7:04*am, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 23:05:17 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    >
    > <julieb...@frontier.com> wrote:
    > > sf wrote:
    > > > On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 15:11:44 -0700 (PDT), spamtrap1888
    > > > <spamtrap1...@gmail.com> wrote:

    >
    > > >> Brit: A sturdy enameled oilcloth.

    >
    > > > I know what enamel is and I know what oilcloth is, but what the heck
    > > > is *enameled* oilcloth?

    >
    > >http://thesewingacademy.org/index.php?topic=8061.0

    >
    > Thanks, I think. *I'm still not visualizing it and still can't imagine
    > how it is used or even why it would be a topic here.


    "American cloth" is the only term I know parallel to "Canadian bacon."

  10. #10
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: "American cloth"

    Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 07:04:23 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 23:05:17 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> sf wrote:
    >>>> On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 15:11:44 -0700 (PDT), spamtrap1888
    >>>> <s[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Brit: A sturdy enameled oilcloth.
    >>>>
    >>>> I know what enamel is and I know what oilcloth is, but what the
    >>>> heck is *enameled* oilcloth?
    >>>
    >>> http://thesewingacademy.org/index.php?topic=8061.0
    >>>

    >> Thanks, I think. I'm still not visualizing it and still can't
    >> imagine how it is used or even why it would be a topic here.

    >
    > I don't know why it is here, but what about fabric for tents? Many
    > communities in the west started out as tent cities.


    I've seen plenty of old oiled canvas tents, and not one was ever "enameled".

    Those damn things are super heavy but extremely sturdy. The biggest hassle
    is maintenance, where they have to be put away scrupulously dried, or they
    will stink next time out.

    MartyB



  11. #11
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: "American cloth"

    On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 08:44:13 -0400, Jim Elbrecht <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 17:54:17 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>spamtrap1888 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> Brit: A sturdy enameled oilcloth.

    >>
    >>How does one put enamel on oilcloth?
    >>

    >
    >With a brush? Great floor cover- or tablecloth. [I've had the
    >former, don't remember the latter, but the pictures look familiar]
    >http://www.curbly.com/users/modhomee...how-to-make-it
    >
    >Jim


    Another:
    http://www.dunberryhilldesigns.com/?...FcFxOgodijgAYg

  12. #12
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: "American cloth"

    On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 12:21:17 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 07:04:23 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 23:05:17 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> sf wrote:
    >>>>> On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 15:11:44 -0700 (PDT), spamtrap1888
    >>>>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Brit: A sturdy enameled oilcloth.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I know what enamel is and I know what oilcloth is, but what the
    >>>>> heck is *enameled* oilcloth?
    >>>>
    >>>> http://thesewingacademy.org/index.php?topic=8061.0
    >>>>
    >>> Thanks, I think. I'm still not visualizing it and still can't
    >>> imagine how it is used or even why it would be a topic here.

    >>
    >> I don't know why it is here, but what about fabric for tents? Many
    >> communities in the west started out as tent cities.

    >
    >I've seen plenty of old oiled canvas tents, and not one was ever "enameled".
    >
    >Those damn things are super heavy but extremely sturdy. The biggest hassle
    >is maintenance, where they have to be put away scrupulously dried, or they
    >will stink next time out.
    >
    >MartyB
    >


    Around here they are called sheepherder's tents. They all have a hole
    in the roof for a chimney pipe for the sheepherder's stove. Deer
    hunters often used them when they set up camp for a week or more. You
    could scuff your knuckles really bad on the fabric when you were
    setting up the tent. And you're right, they stink. They stink to
    start because of whatever is used to coat the fabric to make it water
    proof.
    Janet US

  13. #13
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: "American cloth"

    On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 13:31:18 -0400, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

    >On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 08:44:13 -0400, Jim Elbrecht <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 17:54:17 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
    >><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>spamtrap1888 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>> Brit: A sturdy enameled oilcloth.
    >>>
    >>>How does one put enamel on oilcloth?
    >>>

    >>
    >>With a brush? Great floor cover- or tablecloth. [I've had the
    >>former, don't remember the latter, but the pictures look familiar]
    >>http://www.curbly.com/users/modhomee...how-to-make-it
    >>
    >>Jim

    >
    >Another:
    >http://www.dunberryhilldesigns.com/?...FcFxOgodijgAYg


    O.k., now I know what they are talking about.
    Haven't seen mention of that in a long time. At one time it was kind
    of a fad.
    Janet US

  14. #14
    sf Guest

    Default Re: "American cloth"

    On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 08:23:22 -0600, Janet Bostwick
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 07:04:23 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 23:05:17 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    > ><[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> sf wrote:
    > >> > On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 15:11:44 -0700 (PDT), spamtrap1888
    > >> > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> >> Brit: A sturdy enameled oilcloth.
    > >> >
    > >> > I know what enamel is and I know what oilcloth is, but what the heck
    > >> > is *enameled* oilcloth?
    > >>
    > >> http://thesewingacademy.org/index.php?topic=8061.0
    > >>

    > >Thanks, I think. I'm still not visualizing it and still can't imagine
    > >how it is used or even why it would be a topic here.

    >
    > I don't know why it is here, but what about fabric for tents? Many
    > communities in the west started out as tent cities.


    I was thinking at first that it would be used more like a rug, but I
    think now that the rugs are some other painted canvas. In any case,
    this thread lead me to how to make oil cloth which is more useful and
    something that you can I could actually do if we wanted to.

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  15. #15
    sf Guest

    Default Re: "American cloth"

    On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 08:15:06 -0700 (PDT), spamtrap1888
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "American cloth" is the only term I know parallel to "Canadian bacon."


    It was a term you were actually *familiar* with? You didn't just
    blunder into it somewhere on the internet? What part of the country
    did you come from?

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  16. #16
    sf Guest

    Default Re: "American cloth"

    On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 12:44:15 -0600, Janet Bostwick
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 13:31:18 -0400, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >
    > >On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 08:44:13 -0400, Jim Elbrecht <[email protected]>
    > >wrote:
    > >
    > >>On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 17:54:17 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
    > >><[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>>spamtrap1888 <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>>> Brit: A sturdy enameled oilcloth.
    > >>>
    > >>>How does one put enamel on oilcloth?
    > >>>
    > >>
    > >>With a brush? Great floor cover- or tablecloth. [I've had the
    > >>former, don't remember the latter, but the pictures look familiar]
    > >>http://www.curbly.com/users/modhomee...how-to-make-it
    > >>
    > >>Jim

    > >
    > >Another:
    > >http://www.dunberryhilldesigns.com/?...FcFxOgodijgAYg

    >
    > O.k., now I know what they are talking about.
    > Haven't seen mention of that in a long time. At one time it was kind
    > of a fad.
    > Janet US


    Okay. Mystery solved - it's a British term, "oyl clothes". Figures.
    I've never heard them called American Cloth or Enameled Oilcloth, only
    painted floorcloth.

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

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