Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 48

Thread: Alternative X-giving Dinners?

  1. #1
    phaeton Guest

    Default Alternative X-giving Dinners?

    For just a single guy a whole turkey would be way more than I could
    ever eat. Just a turkey breast (the ones I see frozen) might be a
    better choice, but to be honest I'm not really that crazy about turkey
    anyways. I thought about cooking a whole chicken in my crock pot, but
    if some other idea comes along that's better, then I'm game. Last year
    I made a shepherd's pie, that creamy broccoli/cauliflower/
    brusselsprouts casserole glop, and stove top stuffing. It was at
    least worth the effort.

    Anyone here doing a non-traditional X-giving dinner? Or have you done
    one in the past as a single Joe or Jane that did the trick?

    Thanks.

    -J

  2. #2
    aem Guest

    Default Re: Alternative X-giving Dinners?

    On Nov 14, 9:04 am, phaeton <blahbleh...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > [snip]
    > Anyone here doing a non-traditional X-giving dinner? Or have you done
    > one in the past as a single Joe or Jane that did the trick?
    >

    Do you live near a Chinatown? If so, go get a roast duck. Simple
    sides like egg drop soup, rice and bok choy (don't forget a finger of
    fresh ginger for the bok choy). A western dessert of your liking, or
    a sliced orange. Easy yet festive -aem


  3. #3
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Alternative X-giving Dinners?

    phaeton <[email protected]> wrote in news:d8521e04-8b5c-448b-8f79-
    [email protected]:

    > For just a single guy a whole turkey would be way more than I could
    > ever eat. Just a turkey breast (the ones I see frozen) might be a
    > better choice, but to be honest I'm not really that crazy about turkey
    > anyways. I thought about cooking a whole chicken in my crock pot, but
    > if some other idea comes along that's better, then I'm game. Last year
    > I made a shepherd's pie, that creamy broccoli/cauliflower/
    > brusselsprouts casserole glop, and stove top stuffing. It was at
    > least worth the effort.
    >
    > Anyone here doing a non-traditional X-giving dinner? Or have you done
    > one in the past as a single Joe or Jane that did the trick?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > -J



    I once bought a sliced smoked turkey breast (maybe a two pounder, I
    forget) from the Honey-Baked Ham company. Not as tasty as I'd hoped. But,
    combined with canned cranberry sauce and a dish of steaming hot peppered
    up jarred turkey gravy for dipping, it made OK sandwiches.

    And Bud Light.

    Best,

    Andy


  4. #4
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Alternative X-giving Dinners?

    phaeton wrote:
    > For just a single guy a whole turkey would be way more than I could
    > ever eat. Just a turkey breast (the ones I see frozen) might be a
    > better choice, but to be honest I'm not really that crazy about turkey
    > anyways. I thought about cooking a whole chicken in my crock pot, but
    > if some other idea comes along that's better, then I'm game. Last year
    > I made a shepherd's pie, that creamy broccoli/cauliflower/
    > brusselsprouts casserole glop, and stove top stuffing. It was at
    > least worth the effort.
    >
    > Anyone here doing a non-traditional X-giving dinner? Or have you done
    > one in the past as a single Joe or Jane that did the trick?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > -J



    Buy a turkey leg or two, and roast them. Much meatier than a
    chicken -- unless you actually /like/ white meat.

    Or a ham steak with a sweet mustard/cloves sauce, roast sweet
    potato, steamed broccoli, and a fruit salad.

    Bob

  5. #5
    critters & me in azusa, ca Guest

    Default Re: Alternative X-giving Dinners?

    On Nov 14, 9:04*am, phaeton <blahbleh...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > For just a single guy a whole turkey would be way more than I could
    > ever eat. *Just a turkey breast (the ones I see frozen) might be a
    > better choice, but to be honest I'm not really that crazy about turkey
    > anyways. *I thought about cooking a whole chicken in my crock pot, but
    > if some other idea comes along that's better, then I'm game. Last year
    > I made a shepherd's pie, that creamy broccoli/cauliflower/
    > brusselsprouts casserole glop, and stove top stuffing. *It was at
    > least worth the effort.
    >
    > Anyone here doing a non-traditional X-giving dinner? *Or have you done
    > one in the past as a single Joe or Jane that did the trick?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > -J


    how about going out to dinner at a nice restaurant, and ordering a
    prime rib dinner. if you got late enough, around 7m to 8 pm, (or an
    your or so just before closing) the families will all pretty much be
    gone and you can have a nice quite dinner. i used to do this every
    year, when i owned the 24/7 store. i would take the manager with me
    and the waitress always made sure we had "lots of leftovers" to take
    home.

    harriet & critters in azusa (barb schaller's boy brownies are cooking
    in the oven for a ladies coffee tomorrow afternoon)

  6. #6
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Alternative X-giving Dinners?

    phaeton wrote:

    > For just a single guy a whole turkey would be way more than I could
    > ever eat. Just a turkey breast (the ones I see frozen) might be a
    > better choice, but to be honest I'm not really that crazy about turkey
    > anyways. I thought about cooking a whole chicken in my crock pot, but
    > if some other idea comes along that's better, then I'm game. Last year
    > I made a shepherd's pie, that creamy broccoli/cauliflower/
    > brusselsprouts casserole glop, and stove top stuffing. It was at
    > least worth the effort.
    >
    > Anyone here doing a non-traditional X-giving dinner? Or have you done
    > one in the past as a single Joe or Jane that did the trick?


    I like to make Thanksgiving different every year, so I rarely make the
    traditional turkey dinner for Thanksgiving. My planned menu this year is:

    kale-sausage soup

    pork roast with persimmons
    pork jus
    cauliflower puree
    applesauce with allspice (We plan to make an Apple Hill trip next week)
    winter squash with herbes de Provence
    green salad with cider vinaigrette

    kiwi shortcake (might not happen; kiwis haven't shown up in the market yet.)
    pumpkin-hazelnut pastries


    Looking at past Thanksgiving menus I've made, I think this one from 2005
    might fit the bill for you:

    Deviled Eggs
    Parmesan crisps

    Creamy Chestnut-Arugula Soup

    Hot Melon Salad on Field Greens (This Alton Brown recipe was something of a
    flop for me; maybe you'd have better luck than I did.)

    Roasted Goose Breast with Blackberry Sauce
    Thyme Popovers

    Green Beans with Butter, Lemon, and Hazelnuts
    Parsnip-Potato Puree

    Spicy Sweet-Potato Pie
    Black Pear Tart
    Vanilla Ice Cream, Gran Marnier Zabaglione, and Whipped Cream for topping


    Bob




  7. #7
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Alternative X-giving Dinners?

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    phaeton <[email protected]> wrote:

    > For just a single guy a whole turkey would be way more than I could
    > ever eat. Just a turkey breast (the ones I see frozen) might be a
    > better choice, but to be honest I'm not really that crazy about turkey
    > anyways. I thought about cooking a whole chicken in my crock pot, but
    > if some other idea comes along that's better, then I'm game. Last year
    > I made a shepherd's pie, that creamy broccoli/cauliflower/
    > brusselsprouts casserole glop, and stove top stuffing. It was at
    > least worth the effort.
    >
    > Anyone here doing a non-traditional X-giving dinner? Or have you done
    > one in the past as a single Joe or Jane that did the trick?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > -J


    How about a duck or a cornish game hen or two?
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  8. #8
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Alternative X-giving Dinners?

    "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Nov 14, 9:04 am, phaeton <blahbleh...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >> [snip]
    >> Anyone here doing a non-traditional X-giving dinner? Or have you done
    >> one in the past as a single Joe or Jane that did the trick?
    >>

    > Do you live near a Chinatown? If so, go get a roast duck. Simple
    > sides like egg drop soup, rice and bok choy (don't forget a finger of
    > fresh ginger for the bok choy). A western dessert of your liking, or
    > a sliced orange. Easy yet festive -aem
    >


    I was planning to roast a corniish game hen but I've done that for the last
    few years so it's getting old. I was thinking about half a roast duck for
    Thanksgiving. I can buy one pre-roasted at the grocery store (not from a
    Chinese market, as there are none around). And I won't be making it into a
    Chinese inspired meal since the Chinese aren't the only people who eat roast
    duck

    Jill


  9. #9
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Alternative X-giving Dinners?

    On Sat, 14 Nov 2009 09:04:42 -0800 (PST), phaeton
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Anyone here doing a non-traditional X-giving dinner? Or have you done
    >one in the past as a single Joe or Jane that did the trick?


    If you're not doing a turkey or turkey part will all the trimmings,
    then Turkey Day is just like any other day - especially if you're
    cooking for just yourself.

    If you just plain don't want/like turkey, but would give a nod to
    other T-Day trimmings, try rolled pork loin with an apple stuffing.


    Apple Stuffed Pork Loin Roast
    Paula Deen, 2007

    Prep Time: 10 min
    Inactive Prep Time: 1 hr 10 min
    Cook Time: 1 hr 45 min
    Level: Easy
    Serves: 6 to 8


    Ingredients

    * 3 tablespoons olive oil
    * 1 large onion, chopped
    * 2 Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored and chopped
    * 8 fresh sage leaves
    * 2 cups thick-cut white bread cubes, crusts removed
    * 1 egg, beaten
    * 2 tablespoons butter
    * Salt and pepper
    * 1/2 to 1 cup chicken broth, plus more if needed
    * 1 (3 pound) pork loin roast, butterflied

    Directions

    Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

    In a large skillet, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the
    onion, apples and sage. Saute until softened. Remove from the heat and
    gently stir in the bread, egg, butter and salt and pepper. Add the
    chicken broth gradually until everything is moistened. Let the
    stuffing mixture cool completely before putting it in the pork loin.
    Spoon the stuffing down the pork, horizontally, in a line. Roll the
    pork over the stuffing, jelly roll style, ending with the seam down
    and fat side up. Lightly score the fat, in a diamond pattern, with a
    sharp knife. Tightly tie the pork roast up with butcher's twine,
    season it with more salt and pepper, and transfer to a roasting pan.

    Roast the pork in a preheated oven for about 90 minutes or until an
    instant-read thermometer registers 160 degrees F.

    Remove from the oven and let rest for 15 minutes before slicing.

    Garnish with apples and fresh herbs.





    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  10. #10
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Alternative X-giving Dinners?

    "phaeton" wrote

    > For just a single guy a whole turkey would be way more than I could
    > ever eat. Just a turkey breast (the ones I see frozen) might be a


    > Anyone here doing a non-traditional X-giving dinner? Or have you done
    > one in the past as a single Joe or Jane that did the trick?


    Hi J!

    Although the below has way too many sides for a singlit eater, it's a base
    that is really and truely what we had that year and can be scaled for a
    single eater very easily.

    You could 'un-japan' it easily by making a single yam with some honey and
    perhaps a handful of red or purple seedless grapes (raisins might work too)
    and just baste the little beastie with butter. About 1 cup of stove top
    stuffing will work for a cornish hen, wer had extra on the side to make the
    meat stretch for 2 adults and a 7YO.

    As I was very limited in the larder (commisary closed etc) I made do with
    what we had. More notes below the recipe.

    ---------- Recipe via Meal-Master (tm) v8.05

    Title: Xxcarol's Japan Thanksgiving
    Categories: Xxcarol, Holiday, Cornish hen
    Yield: 3 Servings

    2 c Stuffing-baked
    1 ea Cornish hen
    1 lg Japanese sweet yam
    2 c Rice- medium calrose
    1/4 c Saki
    1/4 c Smashed japanese grapes-red
    3 sm Carrots- sliced pretty
    2 md Japanese cucumbers
    3 sl Bitter melon
    4 ea Green onions- whole
    1 c Red beans- sweet

    Ok, whaddaya do when you get in port at 6pm day the day before
    Thanksgiving?

    You start by defrosting the only 'bird' ya got! That was a cornish hen.
    Split 3 ways, it's not alot of meat but we have the other stuff to makeup
    for that. Make up stuffing (I used bagged pepperidge farm) and stuff the
    hen as much as reasonably possible. The rest goes in a baking dish to the
    side.

    Make a batch of rice in the ricemaker and in the steamer above, add the
    red
    beans (pre-cooked) and the bitter melon slices.

    Slice the sweet yam and add to it the saki and mashed grapes. Add
    sufficient water to cover and taste test for sweetness once the yams are
    done. Add molasses or light karo syrup to taste.

    Baste the hen with the sauces from the yam pot (add more to yam pot as
    needed).

    Steam or blanche the carrots lightly then add the fresh cucumber. A dab
    of
    sugared ginger atop makes it perfect! No dressing neededbut if you
    insist,
    make it a sweet-vinigary one.

    5 mins before the hen is done, lace the green onions into a chain and ring
    them around the bird.

    When all is done, put the hen on a platter with the yams to the side and
    use an ice-cream scoop to ball up stuffing on the other side. Place green
    onion ring around it all and the carrots/cucumbers towards the feet. In
    this case, a lazy-susan dish is perfect if large! I added rice and sweet
    beans to the head portion of mine (extra at the stove) and put a slice of
    bitter melon on each plate.

    Dessert? We were too stuffed! But we had on the ready, fresh tangerines
    and vanilla ice-cream. Line the dish with the tangerine slices then add a
    scoop of ice-cream. Drizzle with chocolate syrup.

    From the kitchen of: xxcarol
    22 November 2001
    Sasebo Japan

    -----

    For you, I''d stuff a cornish hen, round it at the end with the green onion
    for pretty, and have fresh steamed carrorts and green beans with buttered
    mushrooms at the foot. I'd slice a bosk pear and place at the head then
    line the sides with the yams. If I wanted gravy, I'd go with a jar. I'd
    probably make one of those smallest cans of biscuits (they have 5 per can I
    think).


  11. #11
    PeterL Guest

    Default Re: Alternative X-giving Dinners?

    phaeton <[email protected]> wrote in news:d8521e04-8b5c-448b-8f79-
    [email protected]:

    > For just a single guy a whole turkey would be way more than I could
    > ever eat. Just a turkey breast (the ones I see frozen) might be a
    > better choice, but to be honest I'm not really that crazy about turkey
    > anyways. I thought about cooking a whole chicken in my crock pot, but
    > if some other idea comes along that's better, then I'm game. Last year
    > I made a shepherd's pie, that creamy broccoli/cauliflower/
    > brusselsprouts casserole glop, and stove top stuffing. It was at
    > least worth the effort.
    >
    > Anyone here doing a non-traditional X-giving dinner? Or have you done
    > one in the past as a single Joe or Jane that did the trick?
    >




    McDonalds???



    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia


    If we are not meant to eat animals,
    why are they made of meat?

  12. #12
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Alternative X-giving Dinners?



    phaeton wrote:
    >
    > For just a single guy a whole turkey would be way more than I could
    > ever eat. Just a turkey breast (the ones I see frozen) might be a
    > better choice, but to be honest I'm not really that crazy about turkey
    > anyways. I thought about cooking a whole chicken in my crock pot, but
    > if some other idea comes along that's better, then I'm game. Last year
    > I made a shepherd's pie, that creamy broccoli/cauliflower/
    > brusselsprouts casserole glop, and stove top stuffing. It was at
    > least worth the effort.
    >
    > Anyone here doing a non-traditional X-giving dinner? Or have you done
    > one in the past as a single Joe or Jane that did the trick?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > -J



    Duck this year! We don't care for turkey that much at any time of year.

  13. #13
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Alternative X-giving Dinners?

    On Sat 14 Nov 2009 10:04:42a, phaeton told us...

    > For just a single guy a whole turkey would be way more than I could
    > ever eat. Just a turkey breast (the ones I see frozen) might be a
    > better choice, but to be honest I'm not really that crazy about turkey
    > anyways. I thought about cooking a whole chicken in my crock pot, but
    > if some other idea comes along that's better, then I'm game. Last year
    > I made a shepherd's pie, that creamy broccoli/cauliflower/
    > brusselsprouts casserole glop, and stove top stuffing. It was at
    > least worth the effort.
    >
    > Anyone here doing a non-traditional X-giving dinner? Or have you done
    > one in the past as a single Joe or Jane that did the trick?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > -J


    Even if I were only cooking for myself, I would still want something that
    made me "think" Thanksgiving.

    I would roast a Cornish hen with stuffing, Bake a sweet potato, steam some
    Brussels sprouts or asparagus, and serve that up with some cranberry sauce
    and a hot roll or two.

    The Cornish hen will probably be froze, but they turn out quite well. You
    can get frozen pre-baked dinner rolls that are really quite good. If you
    don't bake, or simply don't want to bake, pick up a pumpkin pie from a good
    bakery.



    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  14. #14
    Rob Guest

    Default Re: Alternative X-giving Dinners?

    jmcquown wrote:
    > "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> On Nov 14, 9:04 am, phaeton <blahbleh...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >>> [snip]
    >>> Anyone here doing a non-traditional X-giving dinner? Or have you done
    >>> one in the past as a single Joe or Jane that did the trick?
    >>>

    >> Do you live near a Chinatown? If so, go get a roast duck. Simple
    >> sides like egg drop soup, rice and bok choy (don't forget a finger of
    >> fresh ginger for the bok choy). A western dessert of your liking, or
    >> a sliced orange. Easy yet festive -aem
    >>

    >
    > I was planning to roast a corniish game hen but I've done that for the
    > last few years so it's getting old. I was thinking about half a roast
    > duck for Thanksgiving. I can buy one pre-roasted at the grocery store
    > (not from a Chinese market, as there are none around). And I won't be
    > making it into a Chinese inspired meal since the Chinese aren't the only
    > people who eat roast duck
    >
    > Jill


    Living alone must be getting very old!

    Rob

  15. #15
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Alternative X-giving Dinners?

    phaeton told us...
    >
    >> For just a single guy a whole turkey would be way more than I could
    >> ever eat. Just a turkey breast (the ones I see frozen) might be a
    >> better choice, but to be honest I'm not really that crazy about turkey
    >> anyways. I thought about cooking a whole chicken in my crock pot, but
    >> if some other idea comes along that's better, then I'm game. Last year
    >> I made a shepherd's pie, that creamy broccoli/cauliflower/
    >> brusselsprouts casserole glop, and stove top stuffing. It was at
    >> least worth the effort.
    >>
    >> Anyone here doing a non-traditional X-giving dinner? Or have you done
    >> one in the past as a single Joe or Jane that did the trick?
    >>

    If you're really "not crazy about turkey" and you're just feeding you
    then make something you are crazy about, and since you only have to
    satisfy you now's your chance to indulge yourself. There have been
    times when it's been just me and my cats on a holiday and simply as a
    change (I even like turkey) I've roasted half a fresh ham. I prefer
    the butt half, costs a bit more per pound but it's meatier and easier
    to carve than the shank half... with a bit of kitchen talent you can
    debone it (or ask the butcher), tie it, even stuff it, makes a very
    tasty and festive presentation. And it can be portioned and frozen
    for later. Sometimes fresh ham, with stuffing, gravy, and all the
    standard Thankgiving acouterments is just as good if not better than
    turkey. And anyone doesn't think a whole fresh ham (the king of meat
    cuts) doesn't make a better presentation than a silly gobbler is nuts.

    Go shopping:
    http://i36.tinypic.com/23u3e4z.jpg

    Well seasoned (Penzeys adobo is da bomb):
    http://i34.tinypic.com/2wf39sm.jpg

    Beautifully roasted:
    http://i37.tinypic.com/dy9b1e.jpg

    Favorite holiday side:
    http://i36.tinypic.com/mkiqg6.jpg

    Sliced fresh roast ham makes better than turkey sammiches... goes
    great with rice n' bean pilafs, even diced to make teriffic poke fly
    lice. And even though not smoked a meaty fresh ham bone makes
    excellent soups.

  16. #16
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Alternative X-giving Dinners?

    On Sat, 14 Nov 2009 20:41:02 -0500, Rob <[email protected]> wrote:

    >jmcquown wrote:
    >> "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>> On Nov 14, 9:04 am, phaeton <blahbleh...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >>>> [snip]
    >>>> Anyone here doing a non-traditional X-giving dinner? Or have you done
    >>>> one in the past as a single Joe or Jane that did the trick?
    >>>>
    >>> Do you live near a Chinatown? If so, go get a roast duck. Simple
    >>> sides like egg drop soup, rice and bok choy (don't forget a finger of
    >>> fresh ginger for the bok choy). A western dessert of your liking, or
    >>> a sliced orange. Easy yet festive -aem
    >>>

    >>
    >> I was planning to roast a corniish game hen but I've done that for the
    >> last few years so it's getting old. I was thinking about half a roast
    >> duck for Thanksgiving. I can buy one pre-roasted at the grocery store
    >> (not from a Chinese market, as there are none around). And I won't be
    >> making it into a Chinese inspired meal since the Chinese aren't the only
    >> people who eat roast duck
    >>
    >> Jill

    >
    >Living alone must be getting very old!
    >
    >Rob


    DK. You're so transparent and needy.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  17. #17
    bulka Guest

    Default Re: Alternative X-giving Dinners?

    On Nov 14, 12:04 pm, phaeton <blahbleh...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > For just a single guy a whole turkey would be way more than I could
    > ever eat. Just a turkey breast (the ones I see frozen) might be a
    > better choice, but to be honest I'm not really that crazy about turkey
    > anyways. I thought about cooking a whole chicken in my crock pot, but
    > if some other idea comes along that's better, then I'm game. Last year
    > I made a shepherd's pie, that creamy broccoli/cauliflower/
    > brusselsprouts casserole glop, and stove top stuffing. It was at
    > least worth the effort.
    >
    > Anyone here doing a non-traditional X-giving dinner? Or have you done
    > one in the past as a single Joe or Jane that did the trick?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > -J


    I don't mean to rub salt into a wound - but you need some friends.
    (So do I, for that matter, so please don't think I'm being mean.) Or
    at least people. Thanksgiving isn't about food, but about sharing,
    and you need other people for that. I've had great meal evenings with
    people I didn't really know and mostly never saw again. Pot-lucks
    with friends of friends. If you have the hint of an invitation,
    follow it up. You can be the hero and bring the bird. Save the stove-
    top-stuffing for those lonely nights in front of the TV.

    Bulka

  18. #18
    --Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Alternative X-giving Dinners?

    On Nov 14, 1:24*pm, "jmcquown" <j_mcqu...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > "aem" <aem_ag...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]..
    >
    > > On Nov 14, 9:04 am, phaeton <blahbleh...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > >> [snip]
    > >> Anyone here doing a non-traditional X-giving dinner? *Or have you done
    > >> one in the past as a single Joe or Jane that did the trick?


    One year it was very sad. My wife and I were living in Tampa, and the
    closest I got to turkey was a can of chicken noodle soup.
    >
    > > Do you live near a Chinatown? *If so, go get a roast duck. *Simple
    > > sides like egg drop soup, rice and bok choy (don't forget a finger of
    > > fresh ginger for the bok choy). *A western dessert of your liking, or
    > > a sliced orange. *Easy yet festive


    I can do w/o bok choy, but Chinese takeout is certainly a tradition
    with less orthodox Jews on Christmas, and maybe T-Giving as well. I
    love Chinese takeout duck the way some of the places here make it.

    > -aem
    >
    > I was planning to roast a corniish game hen but I've done that for the last
    > few years so it's getting old. *I was thinking about half a roast duck for
    > Thanksgiving. *I can buy one pre-roasted at the grocery store (not froma
    > Chinese market, as there are none around). *And I won't be making it into a
    > Chinese inspired meal since the Chinese aren't the only people who eat roast
    > duck


    We have those little hens every week or two. My wife often makes them
    on Thursday--or sometimes Friday--nights when I work. I had the the
    leftovers from Fri night's this morning for breakfast. When we have a
    larger place, next year, I'd like to invite a few lonely folks, not
    complete strangers, and certainly not unwashed people, just people who
    don't have family in town to share in a meal. In spite of being non-
    theistic, I do think that thankfulness is nevertheless important, and
    could happily be pretty ecumenical in my celebration. Maybe invite a
    couple of the Joe's Place guys:
    http://www.joesplacestl.org/
    >
    > Jill


    --Bryan

  19. #19
    phaeton Guest

    Default Re: Alternative X-giving Dinners?


    >
    > I don't mean to rub salt into a wound - but you need some friends.
    > (So do I, for that matter, so please don't think I'm being mean.) Or
    > at least people. *Thanksgiving isn't about food, but about sharing,
    > and you need other people for that. *I've had great meal evenings with
    > people I didn't really know and mostly never saw again. *Pot-lucks
    > with friends of friends. *If you have the hint of an invitation,
    > follow it up. *You can be the hero and bring the bird. *Save the stove-
    > top-stuffing for those lonely nights in front of the TV.
    >
    > Bulka


    Thanks Bulka, i know your intent is kind and helpful. I actually do
    have some friends, but they've all got family to go to for the
    holidays. My only invitation means a 15 hour drive to Georgia, which
    in this stage of the game might be a bit much for the old truck (just
    rolled over 166,000 miles). Theoretically I should have a wife or
    even a family of my own to share the holidays with, but I'm well past
    the age of "attractiveness", even for people my own age. I'd have
    some dogs, but apartment living forbids it. So yeah, I shall be alone
    this year again. But I'm ok with that. Not everyone gets to be a
    rock star for their whole life.

    -J


  20. #20
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Alternative X-giving Dinners?

    On Nov 14, 11:46*am, "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz>
    wrote:
    > phaeton wrote:
    > > For just a single guy a whole turkey would be way more than I could
    > > ever eat. *Just a turkey breast (the ones I see frozen) might be a
    > > better choice, but to be honest I'm not really that crazy about turkey
    > > anyways. *I thought about cooking a whole chicken in my crock pot, but
    > > if some other idea comes along that's better, then I'm game. Last year
    > > I made a shepherd's pie, that creamy broccoli/cauliflower/
    > > brusselsprouts casserole glop, and stove top stuffing. *It was at
    > > least worth the effort.

    >
    > > Anyone here doing a non-traditional X-giving dinner? *Or have you done
    > > one in the past as a single Joe or Jane that did the trick?

    >
    > I like to make Thanksgiving different every year, so I rarely make the
    > traditional turkey dinner for Thanksgiving. My planned menu this year is:


    *snip phony menu

    He asked for ideas for a SINGLE GUY.....not a friggin' spread from the
    windmills of your mind. Sheesh. Any opportunity to brag it up and
    try to impress!

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32