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Thread: Alternate to "Ramen" Noodles

  1. #1
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Alternate to "Ramen" Noodles

    Somebody was asking about making ramen noodles at home as a
    replacement for those $.25 packages of "ramen" noodles.

    Go to a well-stocked Asian grocer and you'll find hoards of little,
    cellophane packages of noddles. Not all those are fried noodles.
    many of them are RICE noodles. They usually come with 3-5 flavoring
    packages: The soup mix (the salt/sugar/flavor packages), a package of
    dried vegetables, a pouch of chili powder, a pouch of fried shallot
    palm oil, a package of dried tofu and/or bean curd, and maybe some soy
    sauce or kecap manis.

    My favorite brands are Ace Vinecook and Kung Fu. But there are
    literally dozens of them that have no legible English writing on them.
    They range anywhere from $.39 to $.79 and beat the hell out of any of
    those Nissen fake ramen soups. I always have 5 to 30 of these in
    stock at my house and in my food stash at work.

    And if you still want ramen, there are even dozens more of those that
    you can choose from that will also beat the hell out of those
    supermarket ramens. My grocer has a selection of no less than 100
    brand and flavors of the rice and ramen noodles in cellophane
    packages.

    -sw

  2. #2
    Nan Guest

    Default Re: Alternate to "Ramen" Noodles

    On Jan 25, 12:16*am, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    > Somebody was asking about making ramen noodles at home as a
    > replacement for those $.25 packages of "ramen" noodles.
    >
    > Go to a well-stocked Asian grocer and you'll find hoards of little,
    > cellophane packages of noddles. *Not all those are fried noodles.
    > many of them are RICE noodles. *They usually come with 3-5 flavoring
    > packages: *The soup mix (the salt/sugar/flavor packages), a package of
    > dried vegetables, a pouch of chili powder, a pouch of fried shallot
    > palm oil, a package of dried tofu and/or bean curd, and maybe some soy
    > sauce or kecap manis.
    >
    > My favorite brands are Ace Vinecook and Kung Fu. *But there are
    > literally dozens of them that have no legible English writing on them.
    > They range anywhere from $.39 to $.79 and beat the hell out of any of
    > those Nissen fake ramen soups. *I always have 5 to 30 of these in
    > stock at my house and in my food stash at work.
    >
    > And if you still want ramen, there are even dozens more of those that
    > you can choose from that will also beat the hell out of those
    > supermarket ramens. *My grocer has a selection of no less than 100
    > brand and flavors of the rice and ramen noodles in cellophane
    > packages.
    >
    > -sw


    I've walked past those a bunch of times and had no idea of which to
    buy,
    because most of em are labled in Asian. Guess I'll have to get brave,
    and try one of a few different kinds.
    I was looking at the dehydrated shrimp flakes this week wondering
    what to use them for......Any ideas? It would help so much if the
    proprietor spoke more English too.
    Picked up both black and white sesame seeds to use toasted with
    the salmon sashimi we have frequently at home. That is manna from
    the Gods for sure.
    Open to other ideas too if your sharing recipes.
    Nan

  3. #3
    Zeppo Guest

    Default Re: Alternate to "Ramen" Noodles



    "Nan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Jan 25, 12:16 am, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    >> Somebody was asking about making ramen noodles at home as a
    >> replacement for those $.25 packages of "ramen" noodles.
    >>
    >> Go to a well-stocked Asian grocer and you'll find hoards of little,
    >> cellophane packages of noddles. Not all those are fried noodles.
    >> many of them are RICE noodles. They usually come with 3-5 flavoring
    >> packages: The soup mix (the salt/sugar/flavor packages), a package of
    >> dried vegetables, a pouch of chili powder, a pouch of fried shallot
    >> palm oil, a package of dried tofu and/or bean curd, and maybe some soy
    >> sauce or kecap manis.
    >>
    >> My favorite brands are Ace Vinecook and Kung Fu. But there are
    >> literally dozens of them that have no legible English writing on them.
    >> They range anywhere from $.39 to $.79 and beat the hell out of any of
    >> those Nissen fake ramen soups. I always have 5 to 30 of these in
    >> stock at my house and in my food stash at work.
    >>
    >> And if you still want ramen, there are even dozens more of those that
    >> you can choose from that will also beat the hell out of those
    >> supermarket ramens. My grocer has a selection of no less than 100
    >> brand and flavors of the rice and ramen noodles in cellophane
    >> packages.
    >>
    >> -sw

    >
    > I've walked past those a bunch of times and had no idea of which to
    > buy,
    > because most of em are labled in Asian. Guess I'll have to get brave,
    > and try one of a few different kinds.
    > I was looking at the dehydrated shrimp flakes this week wondering
    > what to use them for......Any ideas? It would help so much if the
    > proprietor spoke more English too.
    > Picked up both black and white sesame seeds to use toasted with
    > the salmon sashimi we have frequently at home. That is manna from
    > the Gods for sure.
    > Open to other ideas too if your sharing recipes.
    > Nan


    I've usually found someone working in the store that speaks decent English
    and is willing to help educate me and help me make selections. Look for some
    of the younger people working there to ask.
    Jon


  4. #4
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Alternate to "Ramen" Noodles

    Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    > And if you still want ramen, there are even dozens more of those that
    > you can choose from that will also beat the hell out of those
    > supermarket ramens. My grocer has a selection of no less than 100
    > brand and flavors of the rice and ramen noodles in cellophane
    > packages.


    That many in cellophane? My nearest Asian food store
    has at least that many instant noodle soups, but I'd
    guess most of them are sealed in styrofoam cups or bowls,
    not the traditional cellophane used for low-end ramen.

    Maybe a year ago I tried one just to remind myself why
    I don't eat them. Since then, I've become more serious
    about salt, so they're definitely off the menu.

  5. #5
    Nan Guest

    Default Re: Alternate to "Ramen" Noodles

    On Jan 25, 3:41*pm, "Zeppo" <ze...@hotmail.org> wrote:
    > "Nan" <nann...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Jan 25, 12:16 am, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    > >> Somebody was asking about making ramen noodles at home as a
    > >> replacement for those $.25 packages of "ramen" noodles.

    >
    > >> Go to a well-stocked Asian grocer and you'll find hoards of little,
    > >> cellophane packages of noddles. *Not all those are fried noodles.
    > >> many of them are RICE noodles. *They usually come with 3-5 flavoring
    > >> packages: *The soup mix (the salt/sugar/flavor packages), a package of
    > >> dried vegetables, a pouch of chili powder, a pouch of fried shallot
    > >> palm oil, a package of dried tofu and/or bean curd, and maybe some soy
    > >> sauce or kecap manis.

    >
    > >> My favorite brands are Ace Vinecook and Kung Fu. *But there are
    > >> literally dozens of them that have no legible English writing on them.
    > >> They range anywhere from $.39 to $.79 and beat the hell out of any of
    > >> those Nissen fake ramen soups. *I always have 5 to 30 of these in
    > >> stock at my house and in my food stash at work.

    >
    > >> And if you still want ramen, there are even dozens more of those that
    > >> you can choose from that will also beat the hell out of those
    > >> supermarket ramens. *My grocer has a selection of no less than 100
    > >> brand and flavors of the rice and ramen noodles in cellophane
    > >> packages.

    >
    > >> -sw

    >
    > > I've walked past those a bunch of times and had no idea of which to
    > > buy,
    > > because most of em are labled in Asian. Guess I'll have to get brave,
    > > and try one of a few different kinds.
    > > I was looking at the dehydrated shrimp flakes this week wondering
    > > what to use them for......Any ideas? *It would help so much if the
    > > proprietor spoke more English too.
    > > Picked up both black and white sesame seeds to use toasted with
    > > the salmon sashimi we have frequently at home. That is manna from
    > > the Gods for sure.
    > > Open to other ideas too if your sharing recipes.
    > > Nan

    >
    > I've usually found someone working in the store that speaks decent English
    > and is willing to help educate me and help me make selections. Look for some
    > of the younger people working there to ask.
    > Jon- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    It's a Mom & Pop store, and Mom does speak good English. However I
    seldom
    see her there. She is very friendly, but Pop is kind of quiet and just
    stands at the
    register reading a newspaper. If you ask for something, he will try to
    find it, but
    offers no help or suggestions.

  6. #6
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Alternate to "Ramen" Noodles

    On Tue, 25 Jan 2011 08:21:58 -0800 (PST), Nan wrote:

    > I was looking at the dehydrated shrimp flakes this week wondering
    > what to use them for......Any ideas? It would help so much if the
    > proprietor spoke more English too.


    I've never seen shrimp flakes - bonito/tuna flakes, yes. But not
    shrimp.

    Whole dried shrimp are pounded to make sauces and seasonings. Also
    used whole in savory baked goods and rice dishes. If they are selling
    shrimp flakes then they're probably trying to hide questionable
    quality.

    -sw

  7. #7
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Alternate to "Ramen" Noodles

    On Tue, 25 Jan 2011 15:32:38 -0800, Mark Thorson wrote:

    > Sqwertz wrote:
    >>
    >> And if you still want ramen, there are even dozens more of those that
    >> you can choose from that will also beat the hell out of those
    >> supermarket ramens. My grocer has a selection of no less than 100
    >> brand and flavors of the rice and ramen noodles in cellophane
    >> packages.

    >
    > That many in cellophane? My nearest Asian food store
    > has at least that many instant noodle soups, but I'd
    > guess most of them are sealed in styrofoam cups or bowls,
    > not the traditional cellophane used for low-end ramen.


    There's probably closer to 120. That's in addition to the bowls, of
    which there's probably about 30 kinds of those. Cases of those are
    stacked to the ceiling in a separate section, along with individual
    bowls on the shelves near the cellophaned noodles.

    I keep meaning to take my camera up there to photograph some of the
    weirder stuff.

    > Maybe a year ago I tried one just to remind myself why
    > I don't eat them. Since then, I've become more serious
    > about salt, so they're definitely off the menu.


    With the cellophane packages and some of bowls, you control how much
    salt you use.

    -sw

  8. #8
    George Guest

    Default Re: Alternate to "Ramen" Noodles

    On 1/26/2011 12:01 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
    > On Tue, 25 Jan 2011 08:21:58 -0800 (PST), Nan wrote:
    >
    >> I was looking at the dehydrated shrimp flakes this week wondering
    >> what to use them for......Any ideas? It would help so much if the
    >> proprietor spoke more English too.

    >
    > I've never seen shrimp flakes - bonito/tuna flakes, yes. But not
    > shrimp.
    >
    > Whole dried shrimp are pounded to make sauces and seasonings. Also
    > used whole in savory baked goods and rice dishes. If they are selling
    > shrimp flakes then they're probably trying to hide questionable
    > quality.
    >
    > -sw


    I have never seen shrimp flakes either, I often buy the bags of tiny
    dried shrimp because of the great taste they add to dishes.

  9. #9
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Re: Alternate to "Ramen" Noodles


    On 26-Jan-2011, Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > There's probably closer to 120. That's in addition to the bowls, of
    > which there's probably about 30 kinds of those. Cases of those are
    > stacked to the ceiling in a separate section, along with individual
    > bowls on the shelves near the cellophaned noodles.


    I think that is a fair estimate; I was just in my local international grocer
    (Global Foods, St. Louis MO) and in the asian section. The "noodle" section
    was at least 25-30 feet long, 6 feet high, with about 8 vertical shelves.
    Though there may have been a few cups on the top shelf, the next two or
    three shelves were every variety of noodle packed in cellophane, much like
    Ramen packaging in the supermarkets. The lower shelves were larger
    packages, mostly cellophane, of varying sizes and type.
    --
    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  10. #10
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Alternate to "Ramen" Noodles

    In article <ihpljq$8rs$[email protected]>,
    George <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I have never seen shrimp flakes either, I often buy the bags of tiny
    > dried shrimp because of the great taste they add to dishes.


    How do you use them? Rehydrate first?

    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of Jella
    "Always in a jam, never in a stew; sometimes in a pickle."
    Pepparkakor particulars posted 11-29-2010;
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller

  11. #11
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Alternate to "Ramen" Noodles

    George wrote:
    >
    > I have never seen shrimp flakes either, I often buy the bags of tiny
    > dried shrimp because of the great taste they add to dishes.


    I think they have a strong fishy taste. I'd only consider them
    in places where I'd use nuoc mam, and I never use nuoc mam.

  12. #12
    George Guest

    Default Re: Alternate to "Ramen" Noodles

    On 1/26/2011 3:20 PM, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > In article<ihpljq$8rs$[email protected]>,
    > George<[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I have never seen shrimp flakes either, I often buy the bags of tiny
    >> dried shrimp because of the great taste they add to dishes.

    >
    > How do you use them? Rehydrate first?
    >


    They are pretty small so they don't really need any soaking. You just
    toss them in towards the end in dishes such as Pad Thai. Their main
    purpose is to bring umami to a dish.

    In some cooking you just grind/break them up and add.

  13. #13
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Alternate to "Ramen" Noodles

    On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 07:46:28 -0500, George wrote:

    > On 1/26/2011 3:20 PM, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >> In article<ihpljq$8rs$[email protected]>,
    >> George<[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I have never seen shrimp flakes either, I often buy the bags of tiny
    >>> dried shrimp because of the great taste they add to dishes.

    >>
    >> How do you use them? Rehydrate first?

    >
    > They are pretty small so they don't really need any soaking. You just
    > toss them in towards the end in dishes such as Pad Thai. Their main
    > purpose is to bring umami to a dish.


    Like dried squid, they aren't too receptive to rehydrating outside of
    a simmered soup or hot pot. They will get a little softer, but don't
    expect them to swell up more than 20%. Smaller shrimp are used in
    congee and other rice dishes, and also savory pastries.

    They come in many different grades and sizes that can range anywhere
    from $2 to $10 for the same weight of product.

    Conpoy, the dried scallop, is also used similarly in sauces, soups and
    hot pots - usually shredded or smaller ones are used whole.

    -sw

  14. #14
    Ema Nymton Guest

    Default Re: Alternate to "Ramen" Noodles

    On 1/24/2011 11:16 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
    > My favorite brands are Ace Vinecook and Kung Fu. But there are
    > literally dozens of them that have no legible English writing on them.
    > They range anywhere from $.39 to $.79 and beat the hell out of any of
    > those Nissen fake ramen soups. I always have 5 to 30 of these in
    > stock at my house and in my food stash at work.


    Those are two brands I have not tried, but I will look for them. My
    favorite is Vifon, it contains rice noodles.

    Becca

  15. #15
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Alternate to "Ramen" Noodles

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Ema Nymton <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 1/24/2011 11:16 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
    > > My favorite brands are Ace Vinecook and Kung Fu. But there are
    > > literally dozens of them that have no legible English writing on them.
    > > They range anywhere from $.39 to $.79 and beat the hell out of any of
    > > those Nissen fake ramen soups. I always have 5 to 30 of these in
    > > stock at my house and in my food stash at work.

    >
    > Those are two brands I have not tried, but I will look for them. My
    > favorite is Vifon, it contains rice noodles.
    >
    > Becca


    I use Shiratake noodles when I can get them.
    They are not digestible so have no calories. Texture is similar to my
    beloved Mung bean noodles.

    I often end up mail ordering them.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinlien

  16. #16
    Ema Nymton Guest

    Default Re: Alternate to "Ramen" Noodles

    On 1/30/2011 11:18 AM, Omelet wrote:
    >> Those are two brands I have not tried, but I will look for them. My
    >> favorite is Vifon, it contains rice noodles.
    >>
    >> Becca

    > I use Shiratake noodles when I can get them.
    > They are not digestible so have no calories. Texture is similar to my
    > beloved Mung bean noodles.
    >
    > I often end up mail ordering them.


    Here, they have them at the health food stores, but they are not in the
    supermarket. Amazon.com has them, one that I like is tofu noodles. I
    have to cook shirataki noodles for a couple of minutes, otherwise the
    texture reminds me of rubber bands.

    Becca

  17. #17
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Alternate to "Ramen" Noodles

    Omelet wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Ema Nymton <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On 1/24/2011 11:16 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
    >>> My favorite brands are Ace Vinecook and Kung Fu. But there are
    >>> literally dozens of them that have no legible English writing on them.
    >>> They range anywhere from $.39 to $.79 and beat the hell out of any of
    >>> those Nissen fake ramen soups. I always have 5 to 30 of these in
    >>> stock at my house and in my food stash at work.

    >> Those are two brands I have not tried, but I will look for them. My
    >> favorite is Vifon, it contains rice noodles.
    >>
    >> Becca

    >
    > I use Shiratake noodles when I can get them.
    > They are not digestible so have no calories. Texture is similar to my
    > beloved Mung bean noodles.
    >
    > I often end up mail ordering them.


    Mung bean noodles aren't low carb.

    --
    Jean B.

  18. #18
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Alternate to "Ramen" Noodles

    In article <ii4p[email protected]>,
    Ema Nymton <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 1/30/2011 11:18 AM, Omelet wrote:
    > >> Those are two brands I have not tried, but I will look for them. My
    > >> favorite is Vifon, it contains rice noodles.
    > >>
    > >> Becca

    > > I use Shiratake noodles when I can get them.
    > > They are not digestible so have no calories. Texture is similar to my
    > > beloved Mung bean noodles.
    > >
    > > I often end up mail ordering them.

    >
    > Here, they have them at the health food stores, but they are not in the
    > supermarket. Amazon.com has them, one that I like is tofu noodles. I
    > have to cook shirataki noodles for a couple of minutes, otherwise the
    > texture reminds me of rubber bands.
    >
    > Becca


    I don't get the tofu ones because they are not calorie free.
    If I'm going to purchase Shiratake, I want the glucomanan ones. :-)
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinlien

  19. #19
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Alternate to "Ramen" Noodles

    In article <[email protected]>, "Jean B." <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Omelet wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Ema Nymton <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> On 1/24/2011 11:16 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
    > >>> My favorite brands are Ace Vinecook and Kung Fu. But there are
    > >>> literally dozens of them that have no legible English writing on them.
    > >>> They range anywhere from $.39 to $.79 and beat the hell out of any of
    > >>> those Nissen fake ramen soups. I always have 5 to 30 of these in
    > >>> stock at my house and in my food stash at work.
    > >> Those are two brands I have not tried, but I will look for them. My
    > >> favorite is Vifon, it contains rice noodles.
    > >>
    > >> Becca

    > >
    > > I use Shiratake noodles when I can get them.
    > > They are not digestible so have no calories. Texture is similar to my
    > > beloved Mung bean noodles.
    > >
    > > I often end up mail ordering them.

    >
    > Mung bean noodles aren't low carb.


    I know that. I was talking about Shiratake.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinlien

  20. #20
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: Alternate to "Ramen" Noodles

    Omelet wrote:
    >
    > I use Shiratake noodles when I can get them.
    > They are not digestible so have no calories.


    Detail - ****ataki noodle carbs are all soluble fiber. Soluble fiber is
    digestible by the enzymes from our intestinal bacteria. So the noodles
    are nearly carb free but not calorie free. We get about half of the
    calories from soluble fiber.

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