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Thread: Ajvar!!!

  1. #1
    Gorio Guest

    Default Ajvar!!!


    Anyone know how to make this? I used to live in a city where I could
    always find it in the jar. Had about three different kinds. Love them
    all. It's a simple thing, I'm hoping.

    If anyone makes this delicious pepper condiment, I'd very much
    appreciate the love. I'm a decent cook, can roast the peppers and all,
    but would like alittle more detail before I move on and some small tips
    would be quite welcome. The one thing you can put on bread better than
    butter, IMHO.

    I can GOOGLE it but fear I'll find some recipe that doesn't measure up.
    I eat Zer Gut right now (from Hungary). Any help appreciated.
    Molto gracci!!!




    --
    Gorio

  2. #2
    isw Guest

    Default Re: Ajvar!!!

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Gorio <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Anyone know how to make this? I used to live in a city where I could
    > always find it in the jar. Had about three different kinds. Love them
    > all. It's a simple thing, I'm hoping.
    >
    > If anyone makes this delicious pepper condiment, I'd very much
    > appreciate the love. I'm a decent cook, can roast the peppers and all,
    > but would like alittle more detail before I move on and some small tips
    > would be quite welcome. The one thing you can put on bread better than
    > butter, IMHO.
    >
    > I can GOOGLE it but fear I'll find some recipe that doesn't measure up.
    > I eat Zer Gut right now (from Hungary). Any help appreciated.
    > Molto gracci!!!


    So is that "Adj-var" or "Ai-var". Or something entirely different? I've
    seen it (even that brand) in a little local store, but I don't know what
    to do with it. Is it (spicy) hot, or savory, or what?

    Isaac

  3. #3
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Ajvar!!!

    On Oct 15, 7:17*pm, Gorio <Gorio.8dffe68.835...@foodbanter.com> wrote:
    > Anyone know how to make this? I used to live in a city where I could
    > always find it in the jar. Had about three different kinds. Love them
    > all. It's a simple thing, I'm hoping.
    >
    > If anyone makes this delicious pepper condiment, I'd very much
    > appreciate the love. I'm a decent cook, can roast the peppers and all,
    > but would like alittle more detail before I move on and some small tips
    > would be quite welcome. The one thing you can put on bread better than
    > butter, IMHO.
    >
    > I can GOOGLE it but fear I'll find some recipe that doesn't measure up.
    > I eat Zer Gut right now (from Hungary). Any help appreciated.
    > Molto gracci!!!


    The Middle Eastern store near my house carries it so I've never
    bothered to make it. This story/recipe sounds good:

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...430271&sc=emaf

    I like the versions with more chili heat.

  4. #4
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Ajvar!!!

    Gorio <[email protected]> wrote:

    > If anyone makes this delicious pepper condiment, I'd very muchappreciate
    > the love.


    Your Foodbanter postings happen to be hardly readable on some
    newsreaders. Why not use something better - which would be most
    anything else, Google groups excepting?

    Ajvar is sold in most every supermarket here. I personally detest it,
    just as I do anything made with bell peppers, but below is a recipe from
    _The Cooking of Vienna's Empire_ by the great Joseph Wechsberg.

    I have to add that chile peppers are often added; yellow and red bell
    peppers, as well as some Balkan or Hungarian paprika cultivars can be
    used, too - and are to be preferred, as far as I am concerned; lemon
    juice can be replaced with vinegar. Some tomatoes can be added, or they
    can replace the aubergines, in which case it would be more like the
    Hungarian lecsó. Instead of chopping, the vegetables can be put through
    a meat mincer/grinder.

    Victor

    Srpski Ajvar
    Serbian Vegetable Caviar
    To serve 2 to 4

    1 large eggplant (about 1 1/2 pounds)
    3 large green peppers (about 1 pound)
    1 teaspoon salt
    Freshly ground black pepper
    1/2 teaspoon finely chopped garlic
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    6 tablespoons vegetable oil
    2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley

    Preheat the oven to 500°. Place the eggplant and green peppers on a
    rack set in a baking pan. Bake the peppers for 25 minutes, then remove
    them. Bake the eggplant 15 to 20 minutes longer, or until it is tender.
    Wrap the eggplant in a damp towel and let it stand about 10 minutes to
    loosen its skin. Peel the green peppers, remove and discard the seeds
    and ribs, then chop the peppers very finely and transfer them to a glass
    mixing bowl. Peel the eggplant, chop it very finely and squeeze it dry
    in a kitchen towel.

    Add the eggplant, the salt and a few grindings of black pepper to the
    chopped peppers in the mixing bowl. Then, with a wooden spoon, stir in
    the garlic, lemon juice and vegetable oil, mixing all the ingredients
    together thoroughly. Taste for seasoning.

    Chill and garnish with the parsley. Srpski ajvar is served as a relish.


  5. #5
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Ajvar!!!

    On Sun, 16 Oct 2011 02:17:35 +0000, Gorio
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Anyone know how to make this?


    No. I have absolutely no idea what you're talking about either.

    --
    All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt.

  6. #6
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Ajvar!!!

    sf replied to Gorio:

    >> Anyone know how to make this?

    >
    > No. I have absolutely no idea what you're talking about either.


    He's just talkin' 'bout Shaft.

    Bob




  7. #7
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Ajvar!!!

    On 2011-10-16, Gorio <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I eat Zer Gut right now (from Hungary). Any help appreciated.
    > Molto gracci!!!


    First time I ran across it was in Whole Foods. It was so amazing I
    bought 2 cases and gave jars out fer Christmas. I've tried different
    brands over the years, but that first was my favorite. Surprisingly,
    it was the only one that listed carrots among the ingredients.

    nb

  8. #8
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Ajvar!!!

    On Oct 16, 1:29*am, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > On Sun, 16 Oct 2011 02:17:35 +0000, Gorio
    >
    > <Gorio.8dffe68.835...@foodbanter.com> wrote:
    > > Anyone know how to make this?

    >
    > No. *I have absolutely no idea what you're talking about either.
    >


    Goes great with cevapcici, as does kajmak.

  9. #9
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Ajvar!!!

    On Sun, 16 Oct 2011 02:17:35 +0000, Gorio
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >Anyone know how to make this? I used to live in a city where I could
    >always find it in the jar. Had about three different kinds. Love them
    >all. It's a simple thing, I'm hoping.
    >
    >If anyone makes this delicious pepper condiment, I'd very much
    >appreciate the love. I'm a decent cook, can roast the peppers and all,
    >but would like alittle more detail before I move on and some small tips
    >would be quite welcome. The one thing you can put on bread better than
    >butter, IMHO.
    >
    >I can GOOGLE it but fear I'll find some recipe that doesn't measure up.
    >I eat Zer Gut right now (from Hungary). Any help appreciated.
    >Molto gracci!!!


    It sounds delicious. I hadn't heard of it before. I'm going to look
    for it in my food co-op.
    Janet US

  10. #10
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Ajvar!!!

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Gorio <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Anyone know how to make this? I used to live in a city where I could
    > always find it in the jar. Had about three different kinds. Love them
    > all. It's a simple thing, I'm hoping.
    >
    > If anyone makes this delicious pepper condiment, I'd very much
    > appreciate the love. I'm a decent cook, can roast the peppers and all,
    > but would like alittle more detail before I move on and some small tips
    > would be quite welcome. The one thing you can put on bread better than
    > butter, IMHO.
    >
    > I can GOOGLE it but fear I'll find some recipe that doesn't measure up.
    > I eat Zer Gut right now (from Hungary). Any help appreciated.
    > Molto gracci!!!


    I buy it at Trader Joe's, Gorio. :-0)
    --
    Barb,
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller September 5, 2011

  11. #11
    Gorio Guest

    Default Re: Ajvar!!!


    notbob;1672025 Wrote:
    > On 2011-10-16, Gorio [email protected] wrote:
    > -
    > I eat Zer Gut right now (from Hungary). Any help appreciated.
    > Molto gracci!!!-
    >
    > First time I ran across it was in Whole Foods. It was so amazing I
    > bought 2 cases and gave jars out fer Christmas. I've tried different
    > brands over the years, but that first was my favorite. Surprisingly,
    > it was the only one that listed carrots among the ingredients.
    >
    > nb


    I just grew up with it as Sebian moms in my old neighborhood would make
    it. They used that instead or with butter. I've had very hot and
    pleasantly mild. Problem is, those Serbian moms aren't around and I'll
    ask their sons, and they haven't a clue. One daughter rattled off the
    ingredients; but I was looking for some technical support.

    Thank you to those who ghelped out, and to those who offered insightful
    commentary.

    /aI-var/ is the pronunciation. You just put it on bread, like you would
    bgetter; but is has a lovely chile taste that came become addicting;
    provided you like the taste of roasted bell peppers.

    I also spread it on the isides of the tortilla shells when I make
    enchiladas. Adds a little depth of flavor.

    Sorry if my computer savvy is lacking. I don't even know what a
    newsreader is.

    I just like good eats.

    Thanks again; I'll choose one to try and give it a rip. I only asked,
    really, becasue I got 10 lbs. of perfect red bells at an Amish auction
    for $3. I immediately thought of this condiment.

    I'm trying the one you posted Spamtrap. Just ahppen to have picked up
    some perfect eggplant this morning. Got my grill going and will brush 10
    peppers will oil for grilling.

    Nice you you to reply. Don't know whether to use EVOO to finish or stick
    with the cheaper stuff. Since I'm not cooking with the OO, I'm thinking
    the better stuff will be the deal.




    --
    Gorio

  12. #12
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Ajvar!!!

    On Sun, 16 Oct 2011 20:18:02 +0000, Gorio
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I just grew up with it as Sebian moms in my old neighborhood would make
    > it. They used that instead or with butter. I've had very hot and
    > pleasantly mild. Problem is, those Serbian moms aren't around and I'll
    > ask their sons, and they haven't a clue. One daughter rattled off the
    > ingredients; but I was looking for some technical support.


    Did you plug "Ajva recipes" into Google images? I'd never heard of it
    before this thread, but I see it's an eggplant and pepper spread.
    Looks interesting, I like eggplant.

    --
    All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt.

  13. #13
    Gorio Guest

    Default Re: Ajvar!!!


    Melba's Jammin';1672087 Wrote:
    > In article [email protected],
    > Gorio [email protected] wrote:
    > -
    > Anyone know how to make this? I used to live in a city where I could
    > always find it in the jar. Had about three different kinds. Love them
    > all. It's a simple thing, I'm hoping.
    >
    > If anyone makes this delicious pepper condiment, I'd very much
    > appreciate the love. I'm a decent cook, can roast the peppers and all,
    > but would like alittle more detail before I move on and some small
    > tips
    > would be quite welcome. The one thing you can put on bread better than
    > butter, IMHO.
    >
    > I can GOOGLE it but fear I'll find some recipe that doesn't measure
    > up.
    > I eat Zer Gut right now (from Hungary). Any help appreciated.
    > Molto gracci!!!-
    >
    > I buy it at Trader Joe's, Gorio. :-0)
    > --
    > Barb,
    > http://web.me.com/barbschaller September 5, 2011


    Hour and a half is the closest jar of ajvar to me. I use grab a few when
    I swing through there; but it's a hassle. Now, I have made ajvar. Pretty
    easy. Takes a little time; but you can make a big mess of it if you
    want. As the article suggested, grilling the peppers black (skin) is
    key. Mine is pretty garlicky; but every bit as good as the store bought.
    I bet it will improve in the fridge. Give it some body.




    --
    Gorio

  14. #14
    Don Martinich Guest

    Default Re: Ajvar!!!

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Gorio <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Anyone know how to make this? I used to live in a city where I coul
    > always find it in the jar. Had about three different kinds. Love the
    > all. It's a simple thing, I'm hoping.
    >
    > If anyone makes this delicious pepper condiment, I'd very muc
    > appreciate the love. I'm a decent cook, can roast the peppers and all
    > but would like alittle more detail before I move on and some small tip
    > would be quite welcome. The one thing you can put on bread better tha
    > butter, IMHO.
    >
    > I can GOOGLE it but fear I'll find some recipe that doesn't measure up
    > I eat Zer Gut right now (from Hungary). Any help appreciated.
    > Molto gracci!!
    >
    >
    > --
    > Gorio


    The Wechsberg recipe should work, but, I have never, ever seen it made
    with green peppers- it's always been ripe red peppers. It is ubiquitous
    in restaurants in Dalmatia (Croatia) where it is served with grilled
    meats along with chopped raw onions. There is often a choice of hot or
    mild. The ingredients are pretty consistent: eggplant and ripe red
    peppers, cooked, peeled, deseeded, and chopped finely, mixed with
    vegetable oil, lemon juice or wine vinegar, minced garlic and salt.

    D.M.

  15. #15
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Ajvar!!!

    On Oct 16, 6:19*pm, Don Martinich <dmartin...@att.net> wrote:

    > The Wechsberg recipe should work, but, I have never, ever seen it made
    > with green peppers- it's always been ripe red peppers. It is ubiquitous
    > in restaurants in Dalmatia (Croatia) where it is served with grilled
    > meats along with chopped raw onions. There is often a choice of hot or
    > mild. The ingredients are pretty consistent: eggplant and ripe red
    > peppers, cooked, peeled, deseeded, and chopped finely, mixed with
    > vegetable oil, lemon juice or wine vinegar, minced garlic and salt.
    >


    West of the Rockies, the bell pepper is commonly referred to as the
    green pepper. Maybe whoever translated Wechsberg's recipe was thinking
    "bell pepper."


  16. #16
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Ajvar!!!

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Gorio <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Melba's Jammin';1672087 Wrote:
    > > In article [email protected],
    > > Gorio [email protected] wrote:
    > > -
    > > Anyone know how to make this? I used to live in a city where I could
    > > always find it in the jar. Had about three different kinds. Love them
    > > all. It's a simple thing, I'm hoping.
    > >
    > > If anyone makes this delicious pepper condiment, I'd very much
    > > appreciate the love. I'm a decent cook, can roast the peppers and all,
    > > but would like alittle more detail before I move on and some small
    > > tips
    > > would be quite welcome. The one thing you can put on bread better than
    > > butter, IMHO.
    > >
    > > I can GOOGLE it but fear I'll find some recipe that doesn't measure
    > > up.
    > > I eat Zer Gut right now (from Hungary). Any help appreciated.
    > > Molto gracci!!!-
    > >
    > > I buy it at Trader Joe's, Gorio. :-0)
    > > --
    > > Barb,
    > > http://web.me.com/barbschaller September 5, 2011

    >
    > Hour and a half is the closest jar of ajvar to me. I use grab a few when
    > I swing through there; but it's a hassle. Now, I have made ajvar. Pretty
    > easy. Takes a little time; but you can make a big mess of it if you
    > want. As the article suggested, grilling the peppers black (skin) is
    > key. Mine is pretty garlicky; but every bit as good as the store bought.
    > I bet it will improve in the fridge. Give it some body.


    Yum! Reminds me to check and see if I have a jar on the shelf in the
    basement.

    --
    Barb,
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller September 5, 2011

  17. #17
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Ajvar!!!

    On Oct 16, 8:33*pm, spamtrap1888 <spamtrap1...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Oct 16, 6:19*pm, Don Martinich <dmartin...@att.net> wrote:
    >
    > > The Wechsberg recipe should work, but, I have never, ever seen it made
    > > with green peppers- it's always been ripe red peppers. It is ubiquitous
    > > in restaurants in Dalmatia (Croatia) where it is served with grilled
    > > meats along with chopped raw onions. There is often a choice of hot or
    > > mild. The ingredients are pretty consistent: eggplant and ripe red
    > > peppers, cooked, peeled, deseeded, and chopped finely, mixed with
    > > vegetable oil, lemon juice or wine vinegar, minced garlic and salt.

    >
    > West of the Rockies, the bell pepper is commonly referred to as the
    > green pepper. Maybe whoever translated Wechsberg's recipe was thinking
    > "bell pepper."


    I meant "East of the Rockies"..

    Sorry.

  18. #18
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re Ajvar!!!

    On 15/10/11 19:17, Gorio wrote:
    > > Anyone know how to make this? I used to live in a city where I could
    > > always find it in the jar. Had about three different kinds. Love them
    > > all. It's a simple thing, I'm hoping.
    > >
    > > If anyone makes this delicious pepper condiment, I'd very much
    > > appreciate the love. I'm a decent cook, can roast the peppers and all,
    > > but would like alittle more detail before I move on and some small tips
    > > would be quite welcome. The one thing you can put on bread better than
    > > butter, IMHO.
    > >
    > > I can GOOGLE it but fear I'll find some recipe that doesn't measure up.
    > > I eat Zer Gut right now (from Hungary). Any help appreciated.
    > > Molto gracci!!!



    The recipe someone posted in the newsgroup is more of a paprika colored
    eggplant spread. That's not ajvar. Ajvar is a paprika spread.

    For ajvar there is a ratio of up to 1/3 of eggplant to red paprika, not
    the other way around. And by weight, and only when paprikas are entirely
    cleaned.
    Pay attention: eggplant UP TO 1/3, maximum, and by weight. Ajvar can contain
    less eggplant.

    There are versions of ajvar with no eggplants at all, and it is
    considered a true ajvar. Eggplant is used only to mellow the intense
    flavor of a red paprika. Yes, there are people to whom a pure paprika
    ajvar is too intense. Preferences are different.

    I have never, ever seen ajvar made of bell peppers. For ajvar my family
    and all neighbors, and all other ajvars I have ever seen around the
    country were made of red elongated paprika with sharp tops. Its flavor
    is quite different than of bell peppers we used to buy in stores in the
    West. Those are the paprikas for ajvar:
    http://www.reimerseeds.com/chervena-...t-peppers.aspx
    Sweet peppers, long, sharp tops.

    It doesn't need to be exactly this cultivar, but you got the idea. Find
    them somewhere, long and sharp tops paprika. Not bell peppers.

    In the western part of peninsula, some people use a shorter red paprika,
    but again with sharp tops which are still not bell peppers, as bell
    peppers are not of the same and intense flavor, and even do not look
    like the same.
    Like these ones:
    http://www.amazon.com/Antohi-Romania.../dp/B0027RGID2
    Again. they don't need to be exactly the same cultivar, but certainly no
    bell peppers for ajvar. I think you'll be disappointed if using bell peppers
    comparing it to the ajvar from a factory you already tasted.

    From 100 paprikas and a moderate amount of eggplants you end up with
    about 6kg (13.23lb) of ajvar.

    Making ajvar is a highly demanding job. For about two large bags of
    paprikas (imagine a large garbage bags) it begins in the morning and
    ends in the evening.
    After roasting them, a skin of each and every paprika has to be cleaned
    off its seed, and skins peeled off. Than, ground them through a meat
    grounding machine. Cook them for 3 hours of cooking (or longer, depends
    of the amount of the ajvar in your big kettle) with constant stirring.
    Constant stirring ! No cigarette breaks.

    Industry uses steaming process, not roasting, in order to get their
    skins peeled. The final aroma is slightly different, but still good.
    However, when it comes to a flavor, it's all about the choice of
    paprika, and amount of acid and eggplant.

    Ajvar is completely cooked and ready to transfer into sterilized glass
    jars when you see the bottom of a kettle when stirring the ajvar.


  19. #19
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Re Ajvar!!!

    On Thu, 28 Feb 2013 23:59:34 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] wrote:

    >
    > The recipe someone posted in the newsgroup is more of a paprika colored
    > eggplant spread. That's not ajvar. Ajvar is a paprika spread.
    >
    > For ajvar there is a ratio of up to 1/3 of eggplant to red paprika, not
    > the other way around. And by weight, and only when paprikas are entirely
    > cleaned.
    > Pay attention: eggplant UP TO 1/3, maximum, and by weight. Ajvar can contain
    > less eggplant.
    >
    > There are versions of ajvar with no eggplants at all, and it is
    > considered a true ajvar. Eggplant is used only to mellow the intense
    > flavor of a red paprika. Yes, there are people to whom a pure paprika
    > ajvar is too intense. Preferences are different.
    >
    > I have never, ever seen ajvar made of bell peppers. For ajvar my family
    > and all neighbors, and all other ajvars I have ever seen around the
    > country were made of red elongated paprika with sharp tops. Its flavor
    > is quite different than of bell peppers we used to buy in stores in the
    > West. Those are the paprikas for ajvar:
    > http://www.reimerseeds.com/chervena-...t-peppers.aspx


    Of course, the first recipe I googled called for bell pepper, but it
    looks and sounds delicious anyway - maybe because the pepper you
    describe doesn't exist here commercially (to my knowledge).
    http://www.thekitchn.com/ajvar-serbi...licky-r-148666
    Must look into this more now.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

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