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Thread: Airline chicken

  1. #1
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Airline chicken

    Tried a new restaurant in town. I was not familiar with one item on the
    menu.

    My dinner of Airline Chicken came with a risotto with
    strawberries and toasted filberts in it. Below is some information on what
    that cut of poultry is.

    Airline chicken
    Airline chicken can be several things, depending upon who you talk to. It
    can be a fancy cut, a special presentation, or a negative appelation
    directed at inflight foodservice. The airline connection? Again, several
    theories. These range from practical (chicken travels well, this cut of
    chicken fits neatly into an airline tray/dish compartments) to artistic (it
    looks like it's about to take off).

    Culinary professionals generally agree modern "Airline Chicken" descends
    from traditional European cuts. Most notably "Hotel Cut," "French Cut," and
    "Supreme." The airline version leaves the meat on the first joint of the
    wing. Traditional European cuts are bone only. All version are skin-on.

    According to the National Chicken Council "The term "airline chicken breast"
    first became popular in the 1960s when major commercial airlines included
    full service meals on air flights that were of sufficient length/time to
    serve such meals. Airlines required a relatively small breast portion for a
    number of reasons and kept part of the wing on to give a presentation that
    made the serving portion appear to be bigger than it actually was and also
    to give it a certain differentiation from the non-airline breast. It was and
    still is a relatively costly product. My guess is a chef on PanAm or similar
    top airline developed the concept and other airlines quickly followed. Few,
    if any, domestic airlines still have "meals" that include "airline chicken
    breasts." Some caterers have this type of product for special occasion
    events. The Council adds: "The term "airline chicken" goes back a long way.
    It used to be called a "hotel cut.""



  2. #2
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Airline chicken

    On Sun, 16 May 2010 22:48:22 -0400, "Ed Pawlowski"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Tried a new restaurant in town. I was not familiar with one item on the
    > menu.
    >
    > My dinner of Airline Chicken came with a risotto with
    > strawberries and toasted filberts in it. Below is some information on what
    > that cut of poultry is.
    >
    > Airline chicken
    > Airline chicken can be several things, depending upon who you talk to.


    <snip>

    Hopefully it tasted better than chicken you'd get on an airline.

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  3. #3
    pavane Guest

    Default Re: Airline chicken


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]..
    | On Sun, 16 May 2010 22:48:22 -0400, "Ed Pawlowski"
    | <[email protected]> wrote:
    |
    | > Tried a new restaurant in town. I was not familiar with one item on the
    | > menu.
    | >
    | > My dinner of Airline Chicken came with a risotto with
    | > strawberries and toasted filberts in it. Below is some information on what
    | > that cut of poultry is.
    | >
    | > Airline chicken
    | > Airline chicken can be several things, depending upon who you talk to.
    |
    | <snip>
    |
    | Hopefully it tasted better than chicken you'd get on an airline.

    Some of the better chicken I have ever had were the cornish
    game hens on Canadian Pacific Airlines in the 1970's. That was
    an airline that cared about its food. Ah, nostalgia.

    pavane



  4. #4
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Airline chicken

    On Sun, 16 May 2010 22:48:22 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

    > Tried a new restaurant in town. I was not familiar with one item on the
    > menu.
    >
    > My dinner of Airline Chicken


    I mentioned this here a few years ago when they sold them at costco.
    They are simply a chicken breast with the first section of wing
    attached.

    <http://groups.google.com/group/rec.food.cooking/browse_frm/thread/b19685b0ee447363/53a8607810d3edd4?hl=en&tvc=1&q="airline+chicken"+g roup%3Arec.food.cooking#53a8607810d3edd4>

    I could have sworn the manufacturers name was "Cuisine Creations",
    but I don't see that out there on the Web.

    It was the same company that was started by one of the initial
    founders or teachers of sous vide cooking, IIRC. This is one of
    their first sous vide prepared entrees they packaged.

    Where's Kent when you need him?

    -sw

  5. #5
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Airline chicken

    On Sun, 16 May 2010 23:58:53 -0400, "pavane"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Some of the better chicken I have ever had were the cornish
    > game hens on Canadian Pacific Airlines in the 1970's. That was
    > an airline that cared about its food. Ah, nostalgia.


    Overall, Air Canada is still pretty good. Can't say the food in
    Economy class is anything to write home about though.

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  6. #6
    pavane Guest

    Default Re: Airline chicken


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]..
    | On Sun, 16 May 2010 23:58:53 -0400, "pavane"
    | <[email protected]> wrote:
    |
    | > Some of the better chicken I have ever had were the cornish
    | > game hens on Canadian Pacific Airlines in the 1970's. That was
    | > an airline that cared about its food. Ah, nostalgia.
    |
    | Overall, Air Canada is still pretty good. Can't say the food in
    | Economy class is anything to write home about though.

    Glad to hear it is at least pretty good. I really loved both airlines
    but CP Air ended all its meals with a wedge of Black Diamond and
    a buttery cracker. One of the world's great taste combinations.

    pavane



  7. #7
    aem Guest

    Default Re: Airline chicken

    On May 16, 7:48 pm, "Ed Pawlowski" <e...@snetnospam.net> wrote:
    [snip]
    > According to the National Chicken Council "The term "airline chicken breast"
    > first became popular in the 1960s when major commercial airlines included
    > full service meals on air flights that were of sufficient length/time to
    > serve such meals. Airlines required a relatively small breast portion for a
    > number of reasons and kept part of the wing on .... [snip]


    When I carve a roast chicken I sometimes do this. Once I served it to
    a friend who had never seen it and she exclaimed, "Cool! How did you
    attach the wing to the breast?!" Anatomical discussion followed. It
    was fun but I was once again surprised at how unconnected some people
    are from the food they eat. -aem

  8. #8
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: Airline chicken

    On 5/17/2010 12:20 PM, aem wrote:
    > When I carve a roast chicken I sometimes do this. Once I served it to
    > a friend who had never seen it and she exclaimed, "Cool! How did you
    > attach the wing to the breast?!" Anatomical discussion followed. It
    > was fun but I was once again surprised at how unconnected some people
    > are from the food they eat. -aem
    >


    Next time, impress her again, serve a drumstick with a thigh attached. ;-)

    Becca

    Chicken and Spinach Parmesan

    2 cups diced cooked chicken
    10 ounces frozen spinach, drained well
    1/2 cup sour cream
    1/2 cup mayonnaise
    1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
    salt, to taste
    1/2 teaspoon pepper
    3 ounces freshly grated parmesan cheese, about 3/4 cup
    1 ounce mozzarella cheese, shredded, about 1/4 cup

    Arrange the chicken and spinach in a greased 8x8" baking dish. Mix the
    remaining ingredients and spread over the chicken. Bake, uncovered, at 350
    for 40 minutes or until the top is nicely browned. Don't skimp on the
    baking. The topping needs to be quite brown for good flavor.
    Makes 4 servings



  9. #9
    Michel Boucher Guest

    Default Re: Airline chicken

    sf <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Overall, Air Canada is still pretty good.


    Compared to what? McDonald's?

    > Can't say the food in
    > Economy class is anything to write home about though.


    If they had any, it might not be anything to write home about.
    Nowadays, airlines serve snacks, mostly small cheese trays or
    peanuts, which I cannot digest.

    The last time I ate what I would consider a meal on a means of
    conveyance was when my daughter and I went from London (Ontario) to
    Toronto first class. That was a long time ago.

    --

    "When a government starts to cancel dissent or avoid dissent
    is frankly when it's rapidly losing its moral authority to
    govern."

    Stephen Harper, 18 April 2005

  10. #10
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Airline chicken

    I just got the news that my flight between Newark and Tel Aviv (5/19)
    has been upgraded to first class. Hope they have some of that chicken.
    It sounds yummy.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Airline chicken

    On Mon, 17 May 2010 16:40:14 -0500, Janet Wilder
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I just got the news that my flight between Newark and Tel Aviv (5/19)
    > has been upgraded to first class. Hope they have some of that chicken.
    > It sounds yummy.


    How did that happen? Frequent Flier miles?

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  12. #12
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Airline chicken

    aem wrote:
    >
    > When I carve a roast chicken I sometimes do this. Once I served it to
    > a friend who had never seen it and she exclaimed, "Cool! How did you
    > attach the wing to the breast?!" Anatomical discussion followed. It
    > was fun but I was once again surprised at how unconnected some people
    > are from the food they eat. -aem


    This would be a good topic for a youtube video.
    "We stick the end of the wing in boiling hot
    unflavored clear Jello, count off thirty seconds,
    then press it firmly against the breast portion and
    hold it there until it cools down to slightly warm."

  13. #13
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Airline chicken

    On 5/17/2010 6:39 PM, sf wrote:
    > On Mon, 17 May 2010 16:40:14 -0500, Janet Wilder
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I just got the news that my flight between Newark and Tel Aviv (5/19)
    >> has been upgraded to first class. Hope they have some of that chicken.
    >> It sounds yummy.

    >
    > How did that happen? Frequent Flier miles?
    >


    Yes miles plus a fee. Wouldn't ordinarily do it, but it's a long flight
    and I deserve a little pampering.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  14. #14
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Airline chicken

    On Tue, 18 May 2010 10:45:28 -0500, Janet Wilder
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 5/17/2010 6:39 PM, sf wrote:
    > > On Mon, 17 May 2010 16:40:14 -0500, Janet Wilder
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> I just got the news that my flight between Newark and Tel Aviv (5/19)
    > >> has been upgraded to first class. Hope they have some of that chicken.
    > >> It sounds yummy.

    > >
    > > How did that happen? Frequent Flier miles?
    > >

    >
    > Yes miles plus a fee.


    Thanks, just wondered how it's done.

    >Wouldn't ordinarily do it, but it's a long flight
    > and I deserve a little pampering.


    I often look at first class as I walk by and think 13-17 hours of
    luxury would be nice. Are your seats those cocoons I've seen? What I
    really want is a way to elevate my feet/legs. If they'd just put
    those foot rests, like you'd have on a bus, into long haul economy I'd
    be happy.


    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  15. #15
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Airline chicken

    On 5/18/2010 2:29 PM, sf wrote:
    > On Tue, 18 May 2010 10:45:28 -0500, Janet Wilder
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On 5/17/2010 6:39 PM, sf wrote:
    >>> On Mon, 17 May 2010 16:40:14 -0500, Janet Wilder
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I just got the news that my flight between Newark and Tel Aviv (5/19)
    >>>> has been upgraded to first class. Hope they have some of that chicken.
    >>>> It sounds yummy.
    >>>
    >>> How did that happen? Frequent Flier miles?
    >>>

    >>
    >> Yes miles plus a fee.

    >
    > Thanks, just wondered how it's done.
    >
    >> Wouldn't ordinarily do it, but it's a long flight
    >> and I deserve a little pampering.

    >
    > I often look at first class as I walk by and think 13-17 hours of
    > luxury would be nice. Are your seats those cocoons I've seen? What I
    > really want is a way to elevate my feet/legs. If they'd just put
    > those foot rests, like you'd have on a bus, into long haul economy I'd
    > be happy.
    >
    >

    I don't know if they are cocoons, but they do recline and have little
    hoods on top. At least that's what I saw in the photos. Last time I
    traveled first class was in the 80's

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  16. #16
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Airline chicken

    On Tue, 18 May 2010 22:45:52 -0500, Janet Wilder
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I don't know if they are cocoons, but they do recline and have little
    > hoods on top.


    Close enough!

    >At least that's what I saw in the photos. Last time I traveled first class was in the 80's


    It was longer ago for me. Back in the days when 1st class was still
    reasonable and normal people could afford a ticket w/o upgrade miles
    or their employer paying for it.

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

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