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Thread: Adventures in dried beans

  1. #1
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Adventures in dried beans

    I decided to make some three bean salad. I've used dried beans in
    soups before but not for anything where the beans stood on their
    own. In other words, I wanted them to come out whole looking like
    you'd get from a can.

    Well, I bought some dried beans and immediately made the mistake of
    soaking the black beans and the cannellinis together. Dumb. Purple
    beans anyone? Already I knew my salad would be even more unattractive
    than I usually find it. For some reason I have a craving so I decided to
    forge ahead.

    Instructions say to simmer the beans for an hour and a half. What
    a dreadful looking pile of bean remains I wound up with. I'd checked
    during the process and they didn't seem ready much earlier.

    So, if you were making bean salad, would you stick with the canned
    beans and save the dried for things like soups? Or am I missing some
    crucial step in the rehydration project?

    nancy




  2. #2
    Michael \Dog3\ Guest

    Default Re: Adventures in dried beans

    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]>
    news:6ANln.329785$[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking

    > I decided to make some three bean salad. I've used dried beans in
    > soups before but not for anything where the beans stood on their
    > own. In other words, I wanted them to come out whole looking like
    > you'd get from a can.
    >
    > Well, I bought some dried beans and immediately made the mistake of
    > soaking the black beans and the cannellinis together. Dumb. Purple
    > beans anyone? Already I knew my salad would be even more unattractive
    > than I usually find it. For some reason I have a craving so I decided
    > to forge ahead.
    >
    > Instructions say to simmer the beans for an hour and a half. What
    > a dreadful looking pile of bean remains I wound up with. I'd checked
    > during the process and they didn't seem ready much earlier.
    >
    > So, if you were making bean salad, would you stick with the canned
    > beans and save the dried for things like soups? Or am I missing some
    > crucial step in the rehydration project?


    Nancy,

    I have never used dried beans for salads. I have always used canned
    beans, rinsed of course. If I were going to use the dried beans I'd
    follow the same process you did but I would chill them in the fridge. You
    did not mention if you did this or not. What did you do with the dreadful
    pile of beans? I'd have made soup out of 'em Purple Bean Surprise
    soup. Hmmm... Halloween soup maybe?

    Michael

    --
    "Like all great divas, I owe everything to the kindness of gay men."
    ~Margaret Cho

    You can find me at: - michael at lonergan dot us dot com

  3. #3
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Adventures in dried beans

    Michael "Dog3" wrote:
    > "Nancy Young" <[email protected]>


    >> Well, I bought some dried beans and immediately made the mistake of
    >> soaking the black beans and the cannellinis together. Dumb. Purple
    >> beans anyone? Already I knew my salad would be even more
    >> unattractive than I usually find it. For some reason I have a
    >> craving so I decided to forge ahead.
    >>
    >> Instructions say to simmer the beans for an hour and a half. What
    >> a dreadful looking pile of bean remains I wound up with. I'd checked
    >> during the process and they didn't seem ready much earlier.
    >>
    >> So, if you were making bean salad, would you stick with the canned
    >> beans and save the dried for things like soups? Or am I missing some
    >> crucial step in the rehydration project?


    > I have never used dried beans for salads. I have always used canned
    > beans, rinsed of course. If I were going to use the dried beans I'd
    > follow the same process you did but I would chill them in the fridge.


    After boiling them? Because they were a pile of mush. I've seen
    more attractive refried beans ... and I can't even look at those.
    Okay, exaggerating a bit, but you get the idea. They were destroyed.
    I should have tossed them on the compost heap.

    > You did not mention if you did this or not. What did you do with the
    > dreadful pile of beans? I'd have made soup out of 'em Purple Bean
    > Surprise soup. Hmmm... Halloween soup maybe?


    (laugh!) No, I was done with those beans. How tasty could they have
    been? I didn't know they would go from "still kind of hard" to
    "undefinable mystery glop" in a matter of 15 minutes or so. Purplish
    mystery stuff.

    I'm sticking with canned beans for salad.

    nancy

  4. #4
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Adventures in dried beans

    In article <6ANln.329785$[email protected]>,
    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I decided to make some three bean salad. I've used dried beans in
    > soups before but not for anything where the beans stood on their
    > own. In other words, I wanted them to come out whole looking like
    > you'd get from a can.
    >
    > Well, I bought some dried beans and immediately made the mistake of
    > soaking the black beans and the cannellinis together. Dumb. Purple
    > beans anyone? Already I knew my salad would be even more unattractive
    > than I usually find it. For some reason I have a craving so I decided to
    > forge ahead.
    >
    > Instructions say to simmer the beans for an hour and a half. What
    > a dreadful looking pile of bean remains I wound up with. I'd checked
    > during the process and they didn't seem ready much earlier.
    >
    > So, if you were making bean salad, would you stick with the canned
    > beans and save the dried for things like soups? Or am I missing some
    > crucial step in the rehydration project?
    >
    > nancy


    I guess you could just rehydrate and cook them separately? Sorry, never
    tried this! There are multi-bean mixes at the store that probably won't
    dye your mix. <g>
    Canned is always an option but for a salad, I'd give them a good rinse.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  5. #5
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Adventures in dried beans

    In article <W1Oln.329789$[email protected]>,
    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > After boiling them? Because they were a pile of mush. I've seen
    > more attractive refried beans ... and I can't even look at those.
    > Okay, exaggerating a bit, but you get the idea. They were destroyed.
    > I should have tossed them on the compost heap.


    Nah, toss them in the blender and make refried beans. <g>
    Then make them into a chip dip or a mexican dish!

    Melted cheese covers a multitude of sins... :-)
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  6. #6
    aem Guest

    Default Re: Adventures in dried beans

    On Mar 10, 5:58 am, "Nancy Young" <rjynly...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > I decided to make some three bean salad. I've used dried beans in
    > soups before but not for anything where the beans stood on their
    > own. In other words, I wanted them to come out whole looking like
    > you'd get from a can.
    >
    > Well, I bought some dried beans and immediately made the mistake of
    > soaking the black beans and the cannellinis together. Dumb. Purple
    > beans anyone? Already I knew my salad would be even more unattractive
    > than I usually find it. For some reason I have a craving so I decided to
    > forge ahead.
    >
    > Instructions say to simmer the beans for an hour and a half. What
    > a dreadful looking pile of bean remains I wound up with. I'd checked
    > during the process and they didn't seem ready much earlier.
    >

    So I take it that the question is how to cook beans so they get tender
    but stay whole and pretty and not mush? I have zero experience with
    dry cannellinis but for black beans it's pretty standard. Rinse the
    beans and check carefully for debris and little rocks. Soak 'em or
    not, depending on time available, and check 'em again for rocks and
    discard any half beans and beans that have lost their skin. Simmer
    uncovered -- below a full boil -- until tender, adding hot water from
    your electric kettle if necessary to maintain about an inch of
    coverage. People argue about whether salt and fat keep the beans from
    getting tender. I find it easier just to wait say 45 minutes before
    adding the salt pork or bacon or ham hock or ham bone, and an hour
    before beginning to add salt. I usually salt again at the end of
    cooking. If I'm using onion, garlic or bay leaf I put 'em in at the
    beginning (whole, and discard after cooking). I guess the important
    thing is to bite-test before the beans overcook and start to get
    mushy.

    > So, if you were making bean salad, would you stick with the canned
    > beans and save the dried for things like soups? Or am I missing some
    > crucial step in the rehydration project?


    Don't know. Though we eat lots of hot beans of several kinds we never
    eat cold bean salad. What makes it any good? -aem


  7. #7
    The Ranger Guest

    Default Re: Adventures in dried beans

    Nancy Young <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:6ANln.329785$[email protected]..
    >I decided to make some three bean salad. I've used dried beans in soups
    >before but not for anything where the beans stood on their
    > own. In other words, I wanted them to come out whole looking like
    > you'd get from a can.
    > Well, I bought some dried beans and immediately made the mistake of
    > soaking the black beans and the cannellinis together. Dumb. Purple
    > beans anyone? Already I knew my salad would be even more unattractive
    > than I usually find it. For some reason I have a craving so I decided to
    > forge ahead.
    >
    > Instructions say to simmer the beans for an hour and a half. What
    > a dreadful looking pile of bean remains I wound up with. I'd checked
    > during the process and they didn't seem ready much earlier.
    > So, if you were making bean salad, would you stick with the canned
    > beans and save the dried for things like soups? Or am I missing some
    > crucial step in the rehydration project?


    I only use canned beans for bean salad; convenience and (generally) cost are
    the two overriding motivations. My experience with dried beans is very
    limited to soups and baked where presentation isn't often a part of the
    equation.

    The Ranger



  8. #8
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Adventures in dried beans

    aem wrote:
    > On Mar 10, 5:58 am, "Nancy Young" <rjynly...@comcast.net> wrote:
    >> I decided to make some three bean salad. I've used dried beans in
    >> soups before but not for anything where the beans stood on their
    >> own. In other words, I wanted them to come out whole looking like
    >> you'd get from a can.


    >> Instructions say to simmer the beans for an hour and a half. What
    >> a dreadful looking pile of bean remains I wound up with. I'd checked
    >> during the process and they didn't seem ready much earlier.
    >>

    > So I take it that the question is how to cook beans so they get tender
    > but stay whole and pretty and not mush?


    Precisely.

    > I have zero experience with
    > dry cannellinis but for black beans it's pretty standard.


    > Rinse the
    > beans and check carefully for debris and little rocks. Soak 'em or
    > not, depending on time available, and check 'em again for rocks and
    > discard any half beans and beans that have lost their skin. Simmer
    > uncovered -- below a full boil -- until tender, adding hot water from
    > your electric kettle if necessary to maintain about an inch of
    > coverage.


    Right off the bat I had no business trying to cook different size
    beans together. Lame.

    > People argue about whether salt and fat keep the beans from
    > getting tender. I find it easier just to wait say 45 minutes before
    > adding the salt pork or bacon or ham hock or ham bone, and an hour
    > before beginning to add salt.


    I'll keep this in mind for when I try baked beans.

    > I usually salt again at the end of
    > cooking. If I'm using onion, garlic or bay leaf I put 'em in at the
    > beginning (whole, and discard after cooking). I guess the important
    > thing is to bite-test before the beans overcook and start to get
    > mushy.


    Yeah, I thought I still had a ways to go. Obviously not.

    >> So, if you were making bean salad, would you stick with the canned
    >> beans and save the dried for things like soups? Or am I missing some
    >> crucial step in the rehydration project?

    >
    > Don't know. Though we eat lots of hot beans of several kinds we never
    > eat cold bean salad. What makes it any good?


    I would never try bean salad. It doesn't look good to me at all.
    Then a couple of years ago I was at my brother's house down the
    shore and his wife made three (or four, whatever) bean salad and
    I tried some because she's such a good cook. I really liked it.
    It's a little vinegary, a little crunchy. I've made it a couple of times
    since, eliminating the sugar the recipe usually calls for. Recipe
    below.

    Why did I try to make this using dried beans? Because if you make
    it using canned, you have at least a couple of cans of beans and then
    some green beans. You wind up with a big bowl of bean salad!
    I thought I could just make 'some' salad if I just used dried beans.
    That idea has passed. Heh.

    1 15-oz can cannellini beans, rinsed and drained
    1 15-oz can kidney beans, rinsed and drained
    1 15-oz can garbanzo beans, rinsed and drained
    2 celery stalks, chopped fine
    1/2 red onion, chopped fine
    1 cup fresh, finely chopped flat-leaf parsley
    1 Tbsp fresh finely chopped rosemary

    1/3 cup apple cider vinegar
    1/3 cup granulated sugar (??)
    1/4 cup olive oil
    1 1/2 teaspoons salt
    1/4 teaspoon black pepper

    1: In a large bowl, mix the beans, celery, onion, parsley and rosemary.

    2: In a separate small bowl, whisk together the vinegar, sugar, olive oil,
    salt, and pepper. Add the dressing to the beans. Toss to coat.

    3: Chill beans in the refrigerator for several hours, to allow the beans to
    soak up the flavor of the dressing.








  9. #9
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Adventures in dried beans

    The Ranger wrote:
    > Nancy Young <[email protected]> wrote


    >> So, if you were making bean salad, would you stick with the canned
    >> beans and save the dried for things like soups? Or am I missing some
    >> crucial step in the rehydration project?

    >
    > I only use canned beans for bean salad; convenience and (generally)
    > cost are the two overriding motivations. My experience with dried
    > beans is very limited to soups and baked where presentation isn't
    > often a part of the equation.


    I had my doubts, but I figured a couple three bucks for two bags
    of beans, what do I have to lose. I still have a bunch of beans left
    over, enough for a winter's worth of soup. Of course, it's spring
    now.

    nancy

  10. #10
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Adventures in dried beans

    In article <MGOln.16822$%[email protected]>,
    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The Ranger wrote:
    > > Nancy Young <[email protected]> wrote

    >
    > >> So, if you were making bean salad, would you stick with the canned
    > >> beans and save the dried for things like soups? Or am I missing some
    > >> crucial step in the rehydration project?

    > >
    > > I only use canned beans for bean salad; convenience and (generally)
    > > cost are the two overriding motivations. My experience with dried
    > > beans is very limited to soups and baked where presentation isn't
    > > often a part of the equation.

    >
    > I had my doubts, but I figured a couple three bucks for two bags
    > of beans, what do I have to lose. I still have a bunch of beans left
    > over, enough for a winter's worth of soup. Of course, it's spring
    > now.
    >
    > nancy


    Plenty of mexican dishes to use up those beans during the spring. :-)
    That is what I use most beans in...
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  11. #11
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Adventures in dried beans

    Omelet wrote:

    > "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote:


    >> I had my doubts, but I figured a couple three bucks for two bags
    >> of beans, what do I have to lose. I still have a bunch of beans left
    >> over, enough for a winter's worth of soup. Of course, it's spring
    >> now.


    > Plenty of mexican dishes to use up those beans during the spring. :-)
    > That is what I use most beans in...


    Thanks ... I have had beans served with "mexican" food that
    were very good. As in, *not* refried. (laugh) Those are not
    for me.

    nancy

  12. #12
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Adventures in dried beans

    In article <6ANln.329785$[email protected]>,
    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > So, if you were making bean salad, would you stick with the canned
    > beans and save the dried for things like soups? Or am I missing some
    > crucial step in the rehydration project?


    If I need the beans to stay relatively whole and unblemished, I don't
    pre-soak them. I cook them longer, usually in the crock pot, and I make
    sure I cook different types of beans separately.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  13. #13
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Adventures in dried beans

    In article <YMydnRH7m8hBLgr[email protected] dth>,
    "The Ranger" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I only use canned beans for bean salad; convenience and (generally) cost are
    > the two overriding motivations.


    How is cost a factor? Canned beans, even the least expensive, are
    more than twice the cost of dried beans, IME. I can get canned S & W
    beans for around $0.59 - $0.75 cents a can. This is equivalent to half
    a pound of dried beans, which I can usually get for around $0.60 -
    $1.00, so even the lowest cost of canned is, twice or nearly twice the
    cost of dry.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  14. #14
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Adventures in dried beans

    Ranée at Arabian Knits wrote:

    > "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> So, if you were making bean salad, would you stick with the canned
    >> beans and save the dried for things like soups? Or am I missing some
    >> crucial step in the rehydration project?

    >
    > If I need the beans to stay relatively whole and unblemished, I
    > don't pre-soak them. I cook them longer, usually in the crock pot,
    > and I make sure I cook different types of beans separately.


    That's interesting. I wondered about the pre-soaking thing, but the
    directions I had said cook them yet another hour if you didn't, so
    it didn't seem a way to go, either. I never considered the crock pot.
    Thanks.

    nancy



  15. #15
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Adventures in dried beans

    Nancy Young wrote:
    > I decided to make some three bean salad. I've used dried beans in soups
    > before but not for anything where the beans stood on their
    > own. In other words, I wanted them to come out whole looking like
    > you'd get from a can.
    > Well, I bought some dried beans and immediately made the mistake of
    > soaking the black beans and the cannellinis together. Dumb. Purple
    > beans anyone? Already I knew my salad would be even more unattractive
    > than I usually find it. For some reason I have a craving so I decided
    > to forge ahead.
    >
    > Instructions say to simmer the beans for an hour and a half. What
    > a dreadful looking pile of bean remains I wound up with. I'd checked
    > during the process and they didn't seem ready much earlier.
    > So, if you were making bean salad, would you stick with the canned
    > beans and save the dried for things like soups? Or am I missing some
    > crucial step in the rehydration project?
    >
    > nancy
    >
    >



    I'm pretty sure canned beans have calcium chloride added to keep them
    firm when they are being canned. You can't really duplicate that.

    You could soak the beans and then just parboil them, but they might be
    crunchier than you like :-)

    Bob

  16. #16
    I am Tosk Guest

    Default Re: Adventures in dried beans

    In article <6ANln.329785$[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...
    >
    > I decided to make some three bean salad. I've used dried beans in
    > soups before but not for anything where the beans stood on their
    > own. In other words, I wanted them to come out whole looking like
    > you'd get from a can.
    >
    > Well, I bought some dried beans and immediately made the mistake of
    > soaking the black beans and the cannellinis together. Dumb. Purple
    > beans anyone? Already I knew my salad would be even more unattractive
    > than I usually find it. For some reason I have a craving so I decided to
    > forge ahead.
    >
    > Instructions say to simmer the beans for an hour and a half. What
    > a dreadful looking pile of bean remains I wound up with. I'd checked
    > during the process and they didn't seem ready much earlier.
    >
    > So, if you were making bean salad, would you stick with the canned
    > beans and save the dried for things like soups? Or am I missing some
    > crucial step in the rehydration project?
    >
    > nancy


    I assume it's crispy beans you want. When I make my 16 bean soup (from dried
    packaged beans, no flavor packet), I soak them over night and then put them in
    the crock pot. During the day there is plenty of time when the beans are nice
    and crispy before the dish is done...

    Scotty

    --
    Team Rowdy Mouse, Banned from the Mall for life!

  17. #17
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Adventures in dried beans

    Ranée at Arabian Knits wrote:
    > In article <[email protected] dth>,
    > "The Ranger" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I only use canned beans for bean salad; convenience and (generally) cost are
    >> the two overriding motivations.

    >
    > How is cost a factor? Canned beans, even the least expensive, are
    > more than twice the cost of dried beans, IME. I can get canned S & W
    > beans for around $0.59 - $0.75 cents a can. This is equivalent to half
    > a pound of dried beans, which I can usually get for around $0.60 -
    > $1.00, so even the lowest cost of canned is, twice or nearly twice the
    > cost of dry.
    >
    > Regards,
    > Ranee @ Arabian Knits
    >
    > "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13
    >
    > http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/


    Silly pondering, but what happens if you factor in the energy cost
    of cooking them? I suppose the amount one cooks at a time would
    have a bearing on this.

    --
    Jean B.

  18. #18
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Adventures in dried beans

    On 2010-03-10, Nancy Young <[email protected]> wrote:

    > So, if you were making bean salad, would you stick with the canned
    > beans....


    Yes.

    You might try pressure cooking (separately) if you have one.
    Basically, that's what canned beans are. For myself, I never pre-soak
    beans. The meat cooks sooner leaving the skin undercooked and tough,
    unless that's what you prefer.

    nb

  19. #19
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Adventures in dried beans

    In article <[email protected]>, "Jean B." <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Ranée at Arabian Knits wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected] dth>,
    > > "The Ranger" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> I only use canned beans for bean salad; convenience and (generally) cost
    > >> are
    > >> the two overriding motivations.

    > >
    > > How is cost a factor? Canned beans, even the least expensive, are
    > > more than twice the cost of dried beans, IME. I can get canned S & W
    > > beans for around $0.59 - $0.75 cents a can. This is equivalent to half
    > > a pound of dried beans, which I can usually get for around $0.60 -
    > > $1.00, so even the lowest cost of canned is, twice or nearly twice the
    > > cost of dry.

    >
    > Silly pondering, but what happens if you factor in the energy cost
    > of cooking them? I suppose the amount one cooks at a time would
    > have a bearing on this.


    I'm sure it does. I'm not sure it's significant, especially when
    using a crock pot. I do cook a lot of beans up at a time when I cook
    them. I freeze the rest in smaller portions to use later, like others
    use canned beans. That way I get the savings and the convenience.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  20. #20
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Adventures in dried beans

    In article <LPOln.17257$%[email protected]>,
    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Omelet wrote:
    >
    > > "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > >> I had my doubts, but I figured a couple three bucks for two bags
    > >> of beans, what do I have to lose. I still have a bunch of beans left
    > >> over, enough for a winter's worth of soup. Of course, it's spring
    > >> now.

    >
    > > Plenty of mexican dishes to use up those beans during the spring. :-)
    > > That is what I use most beans in...

    >
    > Thanks ... I have had beans served with "mexican" food that
    > were very good. As in, *not* refried. (laugh) Those are not
    > for me.
    >
    > nancy


    Refried beans are best used as dips.

    Imho anyhoo! <g>
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

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