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Thread: 700 Degree Roast Chicken (kinda long...)

  1. #1
    Curt Nelson Guest

    Default 700 Degree Roast Chicken (kinda long...)

    Hi everybody:

    So I decided to do some drunken chicken experiments this last weekend
    and I thought I'd report on the outcome. (I was drunk, not the chicken...)

    Ultimately I ended up doing the bird on my rotisserie on my Weber gas
    grill but there's a bit of back story to my drunken chicken adventures.

    It all started when I tried Thomas Keller's roast chicken technique
    awhile back, and I must say it was incredible.

    http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/fo...Chicken-231348

    It really did turn out with wonderfully crispy skin and I was astonished
    that the bird could turn out so juicy at such a high temperature.

    The only caveat is that it does make a fair amount of smoke when you do
    it indoors, so I borrowed an idea from the America's Test Kitchen
    people. My way was a bit different but I think it's an improvement.

    To mitigate the smoke, I used a broiler pan and (in a departure from
    ATK) I lined the bottom of the pan with aluminum foil and then a layer
    of parchment paper, followed with a layer of Yukon Gold potatoes. You
    then put the bird on the slotted cover of the broiler pan as normal.

    When the high temperature fat renders from the bird, it drips through
    the slots and is absorbed by the potatoes and makes a wonderful side
    dish... possibly even better than the chicken. I found that the
    parchment is necessary because no matter what you do to the foil, the
    potatoes will still stick and it's a pain in the ass.

    Anyway, summer has now hit and I thought that if 475 was good, why not
    try 900? (Did I mention the chicken was on sale and I was drinking?)

    Out on my deck I have an old Weber gas grill with a rotisserie that gets
    hotter than hell and I decided it was high time to abandon my
    low-and-slow technique and put the spurs to it.

    I'm not really sure how hot the damn thing gets because the thermometer
    only goes up to 600 and wraps around to the 800 range before it hits
    the stop. Anyway, I tried a couple game hens at full throttle with
    reasonable success, so I thought it was time to try a chicken. (Hell,
    they were on sale for $.79 a pound. What could I lose?)

    The first bird I did actually turned out better than I expected.
    Unfortunately at about the 10 minute mark the fat sort of released
    itself from the chicken all at once and created the mother of all grease
    fires. (I pretty much turned it into a meteor...)

    I pulled out the rotisserie skewer and waved it around a bit and
    eventually got everything extinguished. Surprisingly, the meat was darn
    juicy and the skin was even edible... sorta like any blackened skin from
    your grill at an outdoor picnic.


    I knew I was on to something and decided to give it another go with a
    bit more thought and a bit less booze. Here's what I did:

    To give myself a bit more cushion, I brined the bird in a 10% solution
    for three hours and then dried it really well. Up 'til now, I haven't
    mentioned seasoning. Thomas Keller goes with nothing but kosher salt and
    pepper, which is delicious, but I wanted to try something new.

    In addition to the salt and pepper, I went with a liberal sprinkling of
    Chinese 5 spice powder from World Spice Merchants, just down the street
    from me. They're one of the great mail-order spice houses in the country
    and I encourage you to give them a try. www.worldspice.com

    I put the bird on the rotisserie at about 400 until it started to
    release it's torrential waterfall of fat at about the 20 minute mark.
    Once the bulk of the fat was gone, I jacked the heat wide open without
    fear of any flare ups. For reference, on a Weber gas grill you need to
    keep the middle burner off the entire time. With all three open it's
    just too ridiculously hot.

    With just the front and back burners on, the temperature stabilized at
    600-700 degrees and I used my Thermapen to pull the bird at just the
    right time.

    It turned out wonderfully juicy with a pretty crispy and perfectly
    browned skin. I've found with a rotisserie you're never going to get a
    perfectly crispy skin because it continuously bastes itself in it's own
    fat, but doing it at ridiculously high temperature makes for skin a lot
    less flaccid than the low-and-slow method.

    Give the high temperature method a try. It's a great way to spend a
    summer afternoon. I also encourage you to try Chinese 5 spice. I'd never
    tried it before and the stuff is fantastic.

    Hasta,
    Curt Nelson

  2. #2
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: 700 Degree Roast Chicken (kinda long...)


    "Curt Nelson" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio

    > It turned out wonderfully juicy with a pretty crispy and perfectly >
    > browned skin. I've found with a rotisserie you're never going to get a
    > perfectly crispy skin because it continuously bastes itself in it's own >
    > fat, but doing it at ridiculously high temperature makes for skin a lot
    > less flaccid than the low-and-slow method.


    I rotisserie chicken all the time in a dedicated rotisserie, not a grill. I
    set it at max and let her rip. I always get a very crisp skin. If I didn't
    I wouldn't use this method, because a vertical roaster at 175 will give you
    great skin. I wonder why yours doesn't? You aren't oiling or buttering it
    are you?



  3. #3
    Curt Nelson Guest

    Default Re: 700 Degree Roast Chicken (kinda long...)

    On 7/21/2010 12:06 AM, Giusi wrote:
    > "Curt Nelson"<[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >
    >> It turned out wonderfully juicy with a pretty crispy and perfectly>
    >> browned skin. I've found with a rotisserie you're never going to get a
    >> perfectly crispy skin because it continuously bastes itself in it's own>
    >> fat, but doing it at ridiculously high temperature makes for skin a lot
    >> less flaccid than the low-and-slow method.

    >
    > I rotisserie chicken all the time in a dedicated rotisserie, not a grill. I
    > set it at max and let her rip. I always get a very crisp skin. If I didn't
    > I wouldn't use this method, because a vertical roaster at 175 will give you
    > great skin. I wonder why yours doesn't? You aren't oiling or buttering it
    > are you?


    No, no oiling or buttering. It just seems that when using the rotisserie
    on my Weber there's a ton of fat that renders off the bird and it never
    totally goes away before the internal temperature says it's done.

    No matter, I still had a great lunch. :-)

    Hasta,
    Curt Nelson


  4. #4
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: 700 Degree Roast Chicken (kinda long...)


    "Curt Nelson" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    , Giusi wrote:
    >> "Curt Nelson ha scritto nel messaggio
    >>
    >>> It turned out wonderfully juicy with a pretty crispy and perfectly>>>>
    >>> browned skin. I've found with a rotisserie you're never going to get a
    >>> perfectly crispy skin


    >> I rotisserie chicken all the time in a dedicated rotisserie, not a grill.
    >> I>> set it at max and let her rip. I always get a very crisp skin.


    It just seems that when using the rotisserie
    > on my Weber there's a ton of fat that renders off the bird and it never >
    > totally goes away before the internal temperature says it's done.


    Maybe you should crank back on the heat for the last minutes? I always
    thought my crisp skin was because of the high temps, not in spite of...



  5. #5
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: 700 Degree Roast Chicken (kinda long...)

    Giusi wrote:

    >>>> It turned out wonderfully juicy with a pretty crispy and perfectly>>>>
    >>>> browned skin. I've found with a rotisserie you're never going to get a
    >>>> perfectly crispy skin

    >
    >>> I rotisserie chicken all the time in a dedicated rotisserie, not a
    >>> grill. I>> set it at max and let her rip. I always get a very crisp
    >>> skin.

    >
    > It just seems that when using the rotisserie
    >> on my Weber there's a ton of fat that renders off the bird and it never >
    >> totally goes away before the internal temperature says it's done.

    >
    > Maybe you should crank back on the heat for the last minutes? I always
    > thought my crisp skin was because of the high temps, not in spite of...


    I think it ought to be the other way around: cook at the lower temperature
    until the grease renders out, then crank the heat up to crisp the skin and
    finish cooking. It bears a passing similarity to the technique of cooking a
    beef roast at a low temperature until nearly done, then using a blowtorch on
    it to finish.

    Bob




  6. #6
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: 700 Degree Roast Chicken (kinda long...)

    Curt referred:

    > It all started when I tried Thomas Keller's roast chicken technique awhile
    > back, and I must say it was incredible.
    >
    > http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/fo...Chicken-231348


    "I take the chicken butt for myself. I could never understand why my
    brothers always fought over that triangular tip--until one day I got the
    crispy, juicy fat myself."

    I cooked chicken for the family of a friend of mine once, and my friend
    later asked, "Why did you serve us the tail? We always throw that away."

    I thought that was the height of poultry-consumption silliness until I heard
    about people who are paralyzed with fright by the bones in the chicken!

    Bob




  7. #7
    Gorio Guest

    Default Re: 700 Degree Roast Chicken (kinda long...)


    'Bob Terwilliger[_1_ Wrote:
    > ;1507454']Curt referred:
    > -
    > It all started when I tried Thomas Keller's roast chicken technique
    > awhile
    > back, and I must say it was incredible.
    >
    > 'My Favorite Simple Roast Chicken Recipe at Epicurious.com'
    > (http://tinyurl.com/5w92ml)-
    >
    > "I take the chicken butt for myself. I could never understand why my
    > brothers always fought over that triangular tip--until one day I got the
    >
    > crispy, juicy fat myself."
    >
    > I cooked chicken for the family of a friend of mine once, and my friend
    >
    > later asked, "Why did you serve us the tail? We always throw that
    > away."
    >
    > I thought that was the height of poultry-consumption silliness until I
    > heard
    > about people who are paralyzed with fright by the bones in the chicken!
    >
    > Bob


    That, and the neck. Poeple just chuck the neck and liver in the little
    package in storebought chickens. They used to trow in thr heart and
    gizzards, too. I love both of those. Suck the meat right otta dat
    neck!!!




    --
    Gorio

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