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Thread: The 2011 Hatch Chile Thread

  1. #1
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default The 2011 Hatch Chile Thread

    I'll be the first to start the thread year. The first shipments just
    started showing up in stores today, a little later than normal IIRC.
    They usually show up last week of July. Right now "open stock" is
    going for $1.29/lb almost universally (mild and hot varieties). You
    can buy the 30lb sacks for $30. The prices will go down to $.99/lb
    shortly. Whole roasted chiles will be going for $3/lb.

    And of course there will be Hatch cornbread muffins and biscuits, H
    sherbet and ice cream, Hatch potato chips (still have last years
    batch), Hatch sourdough bread loaves, Hatch chilli, Hatch rellenos,
    Hatch chilaquiles, Hatch browns, Hatch apple cobler, Hatch bloody
    marys and Hatcharitas, Hatch sausage, Hatch upside down cake, Hatch
    cupcakes, Hatch soap, and Hatch pain relieving rub all for sale as
    well.

    I personally still think the green Hatch chiles are highly overrated,
    but I can get into the spirit for one month out of the year. Give me
    RIPE hatch chiles and then we can talk. I'll buy about 10lbs total
    (in 3-4lb batches) as I do every year and make a pork or chicken stew
    at least once. And experiment with the others (no ice cream). I
    roast pasillas all year round so having the Hatches appear is really
    no big deal, unless they're RIPE.

    Here's some recipes to get you Hatch fiends started:

    http://www.centralmarket.com/Recipes...spx?term=hatch

    And a picture of last years chicken, leek, and chile stew to get your
    mouth watering, made with green poblano and semi-ripe orange hatch
    chiles.

    http://img30.imageshack.us/img30/274...enleekstew.jpg

    -sw

  2. #2
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: The 2011 Hatch Chile Thread

    Sqwertz wrote:
    > I'll be the first to start the thread year. The first shipments just
    > started showing up in stores today, a little later than normal IIRC.


    I can get cans of Hatch Chile all year long.
    ....heh...
    <ducking>



  3. #3
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: The 2011 Hatch Chile Thread

    On Fri, 5 Aug 2011 11:59:35 -0500, Nunya Bidnits wrote:

    > Sqwertz wrote:
    >> I'll be the first to start the thread year. The first shipments just
    >> started showing up in stores today, a little later than normal IIRC.

    >
    > I can get cans of Hatch Chile all year long.
    > ...heh...
    > <ducking>


    I haven't been impressed with any of the Hatch brand products, FWIW.

    -sw

  4. #4
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: The 2011 Hatch Chile Thread

    Sqwertz wrote:
    > On Fri, 5 Aug 2011 11:59:35 -0500, Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    >
    >> Sqwertz wrote:
    >>> I'll be the first to start the thread year. The first shipments
    >>> just started showing up in stores today, a little later than normal
    >>> IIRC.

    >>
    >> I can get cans of Hatch Chile all year long.
    >> ...heh...
    >> <ducking>

    >
    > I haven't been impressed with any of the Hatch brand products, FWIW.
    >
    > -sw


    Agreed, they aren't any better than any other canned chile, just more
    expensive.

    MartyB



  5. #5
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: The 2011 Hatch Chile Thread

    Sqwertz wrote:
    > I'll be the first to start the thread year. The first shipments just
    > started showing up in stores today, a little later than normal IIRC.
    > They usually show up last week of July. Right now "open stock" is
    > going for $1.29/lb almost universally (mild and hot varieties). You
    > can buy the 30lb sacks for $30. The prices will go down to $.99/lb
    > shortly. Whole roasted chiles will be going for $3/lb.
    >
    > And of course there will be Hatch cornbread muffins and biscuits, H
    > sherbet and ice cream, Hatch potato chips (still have last years
    > batch), Hatch sourdough bread loaves, Hatch chilli, Hatch rellenos,
    > Hatch chilaquiles, Hatch browns, Hatch apple cobler, Hatch bloody
    > marys and Hatcharitas, Hatch sausage, Hatch upside down cake, Hatch
    > cupcakes, Hatch soap, and Hatch pain relieving rub all for sale as
    > well.
    >
    > I personally still think the green Hatch chiles are highly overrated,
    > but I can get into the spirit for one month out of the year. Give me
    > RIPE hatch chiles and then we can talk. I'll buy about 10lbs total
    > (in 3-4lb batches) as I do every year and make a pork or chicken stew
    > at least once. And experiment with the others (no ice cream). I
    > roast pasillas all year round so having the Hatches appear is really
    > no big deal, unless they're RIPE.
    >
    > Here's some recipes to get you Hatch fiends started:
    >
    > http://www.centralmarket.com/Recipes...spx?term=hatch
    >
    > And a picture of last years chicken, leek, and chile stew to get your
    > mouth watering, made with green poblano and semi-ripe orange hatch
    > chiles.
    >
    > http://img30.imageshack.us/img30/274...enleekstew.jpg
    >
    > -sw


    Around here you almost never see red ripe hatch/numex/anaheim type chiles.
    Some of the stores which cater to hispanics carry roasted chiles in plastic
    packs which are refrigerated. However I only know of one place where there
    is actually a vendor with a roasting drum. But then those aren't
    specifically hatch AFAIK, they are just green chiles, and IMO one is as good
    as another for that purpose. It's worth a trip just for the aroma of
    roasting chiles.

    Mostly I think quality depends on freshness, like everything else. So if you
    live in the Hatch vicinity, maybe that means something, but in Kansas City
    they just become part of the usual produce chain and aren't any fresher than
    any other green chiles.

    MartyB



  6. #6
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: The 2011 Hatch Chile Thread

    On Fri, 5 Aug 2011 11:54:40 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I'll be the first to start the thread year. The first shipments just
    >started showing up in stores today, a little later than normal IIRC.
    >They usually show up last week of July. Right now "open stock" is
    >going for $1.29/lb almost universally (mild and hot varieties). You
    >can buy the 30lb sacks for $30. The prices will go down to $.99/lb
    >shortly. Whole roasted chiles will be going for $3/lb.
    >
    >And of course there will be Hatch cornbread muffins and biscuits, H
    >sherbet and ice cream, Hatch potato chips (still have last years
    >batch), Hatch sourdough bread loaves, Hatch chilli, Hatch rellenos,
    >Hatch chilaquiles, Hatch browns, Hatch apple cobler, Hatch bloody
    >marys and Hatcharitas, Hatch sausage, Hatch upside down cake, Hatch
    >cupcakes, Hatch soap, and Hatch pain relieving rub all for sale as
    >well.
    >
    >I personally still think the green Hatch chiles are highly overrated,
    >but I can get into the spirit for one month out of the year. Give me
    >RIPE hatch chiles and then we can talk. I'll buy about 10lbs total
    >(in 3-4lb batches) as I do every year and make a pork or chicken stew
    >at least once. And experiment with the others (no ice cream). I
    >roast pasillas all year round so having the Hatches appear is really
    >no big deal, unless they're RIPE.
    >
    >Here's some recipes to get you Hatch fiends started:
    >
    >http://www.centralmarket.com/Recipes...spx?term=hatch
    >
    >And a picture of last years chicken, leek, and chile stew to get your
    >mouth watering, made with green poblano and semi-ripe orange hatch
    >chiles.
    >
    >http://img30.imageshack.us/img30/274...enleekstew.jpg
    >
    >-sw

    I'm bummed that my garden didn't turn out this year. When I was out
    shopping for plants I ran across plants labeled 'Hatch' also some
    Freso, Anaheim and a couple other. I wanted to compare and see if
    there was a difference between Hatch and Anaheim. Of course, not a
    true test as the Hatch were not grown in NM.
    Janet US

  7. #7
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: The 2011 Hatch Chile Thread

    Sqwertz wrote:
    > I'll be the first to start the thread year. The first shipments just
    > started showing up in stores today, a little later than normal IIRC.
    > They usually show up last week of July. Right now "open stock" is
    > going for $1.29/lb almost universally (mild and hot varieties). You
    > can buy the 30lb sacks for $30. The prices will go down to $.99/lb
    > shortly. Whole roasted chiles will be going for $3/lb.
    >
    > And of course there will be Hatch cornbread muffins and biscuits, H
    > sherbet and ice cream, Hatch potato chips (still have last years
    > batch), Hatch sourdough bread loaves, Hatch chilli, Hatch rellenos,
    > Hatch chilaquiles, Hatch browns, Hatch apple cobler, Hatch bloody
    > marys and Hatcharitas, Hatch sausage, Hatch upside down cake, Hatch
    > cupcakes, Hatch soap, and Hatch pain relieving rub all for sale as
    > well.
    >
    > I personally still think the green Hatch chiles are highly overrated,
    > but I can get into the spirit for one month out of the year. Give me
    > RIPE hatch chiles and then we can talk. I'll buy about 10lbs total
    > (in 3-4lb batches) as I do every year and make a pork or chicken stew
    > at least once. And experiment with the others (no ice cream). I
    > roast pasillas all year round so having the Hatches appear is really
    > no big deal, unless they're RIPE.
    >
    > Here's some recipes to get you Hatch fiends started:
    >
    > http://www.centralmarket.com/Recipes...spx?term=hatch
    >
    > And a picture of last years chicken, leek, and chile stew to get your
    > mouth watering, made with green poblano and semi-ripe orange hatch
    > chiles.
    >
    > http://img30.imageshack.us/img30/274...enleekstew.jpg
    >
    > -sw


    Oh, neat site. I was thinking of making some stuffing muffin type
    thing with my cornbread that turned out oddly textured (probably
    because I dared say I made really good cornbread) and had gotten
    as far as thinking I'd add some fresh corn kernels, onion...
    Chiles sound like a really good addition. And some cheese...

    I ended up getting tired with more carting things around in the
    hot garage, so if I get anything done tonight, it will just be
    preliminaries for tomorrow. I got a really fine pork chop
    (daughter is occupied) and am thinking those muffins/balls or
    maybe cush (?), and the aforementioned chunky apple thing. I
    might make that in a while.

    --
    Jean B.

  8. #8
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: The 2011 Hatch Chile Thread

    On Fri, 05 Aug 2011 20:13:28 -0400, Jean B. wrote:

    > Oh, neat site.


    That's out our grocery store web site. Every year they make
    everything conceivable out of Hatch chiles as well as Hatch chile
    cooking classes and a Hatch recipe contest judged by customers.

    In case it wasn't obvious from their home page - which is all hatched
    out for the occasion.

    http://www.centralmarket.com/

    A bunch of restaurants in town have Hatch special menus and whatnot as
    well. Austin seems to take these hatch chiles a little more seriously
    than most cities.

    > I was thinking of making some stuffing muffin type
    > thing with my cornbread that turned out oddly textured (probably
    > because I dared say I made really good cornbread) and had gotten
    > as far as thinking I'd add some fresh corn kernels, onion...
    > Chiles sound like a really good addition. And some cheese...


    And bacon :-) That's how I make my cornbread. Peppers, cheese,
    onion, bacon. It's more of a quiche than a bread.

    -sw

  9. #9
    Don Martinich Guest

    Default Re: The 2011 Hatch Chile Thread

    In article <ghd[email protected]>,
    Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:


    > I'm bummed that my garden didn't turn out this year. When I was out
    > shopping for plants I ran across plants labeled 'Hatch' also some
    > Freso, Anaheim and a couple other. I wanted to compare and see if
    > there was a difference between Hatch and Anaheim. Of course, not a
    > true test as the Hatch were not grown in NM.
    > Janet US


    There seems to be some confusion about the name "Hatch". It's the name
    of a town near the Rio Grande River in southern New Mexico and that
    segment of the Rio Grande Valley. There is another chili growing area
    downriver known as the Mesilla Valley and a town by that name. This near
    Las Cruces. Both regions grow New Mexico chile varieties developed by
    the Chili Pepper Institute of New Mexico State University. Here is a
    list of the vareities bred by the institute:

    http://www.chilepepperinstitute.org/...ager/educ_info
    /ChileCultof%20NMSU.pdf

    There is no reason why either Hatch or Mesilla should produce a better
    pepper. On the other hand, the New Mexico varieties from either are much
    more flavorful than any Anaheim. I always look forward to this time of
    year when the NM chiles become available. As for red chiles, my NM
    friends have always preferred ripe chiles, fresh or dried from the
    northern part of the state. I have only had the dried peppers from
    Chimayo which is north of Santa Fe. They made the best sauce. Really
    outstanding.

    D.M.

  10. #10
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: The 2011 Hatch Chile Thread

    On Fri, 05 Aug 2011 18:19:02 -0700, Don Martinich <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    snip
    >
    >There seems to be some confusion about the name "Hatch". It's the name
    >of a town near the Rio Grande River in southern New Mexico and that
    >segment of the Rio Grande Valley. There is another chili growing area
    >downriver known as the Mesilla Valley and a town by that name. This near
    >Las Cruces. Both regions grow New Mexico chile varieties developed by
    >the Chili Pepper Institute of New Mexico State University. Here is a
    >list of the vareities bred by the institute:
    >
    >http://www.chilepepperinstitute.org/...ager/educ_info
    >/ChileCultof%20NMSU.pdf

    snip
    >D.M.

    No confusion about the name or the peppers.
    Janet US

  11. #11
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: The 2011 Hatch Chile Thread

    Sqwertz wrote:
    > On Fri, 05 Aug 2011 20:13:28 -0400, Jean B. wrote:
    >
    >> Oh, neat site.

    >
    > That's out our grocery store web site. Every year they make
    > everything conceivable out of Hatch chiles as well as Hatch chile
    > cooking classes and a Hatch recipe contest judged by customers.
    >
    > In case it wasn't obvious from their home page - which is all hatched
    > out for the occasion.
    >
    > http://www.centralmarket.com/


    I was so focussed on the recipe that I didn't even notice it was
    Central Market's site. Of course, by now I am aware of its
    existence. Too bad I am not going to the SW and California with
    my daughter and her dad later this year, or I might have been able
    to investigate this (and other venues that I have only heard
    about) myself.
    >
    > A bunch of restaurants in town have Hatch special menus and whatnot as
    > well. Austin seems to take these hatch chiles a little more seriously
    > than most cities.
    >
    >> I was thinking of making some stuffing muffin type
    >> thing with my cornbread that turned out oddly textured (probably
    >> because I dared say I made really good cornbread) and had gotten
    >> as far as thinking I'd add some fresh corn kernels, onion...
    >> Chiles sound like a really good addition. And some cheese...

    >
    > And bacon :-) That's how I make my cornbread. Peppers, cheese,
    > onion, bacon. It's more of a quiche than a bread.
    >
    > -sw


    Mmmm. I guess I should thaw my bacon. I need to do that for more
    BLTs anyway.

    Hmmm. Maybe someone here can clue me in to why my cornbread was a
    lousy texture this time. I used the same recipe as always, and
    the same pan. The only differences were that I buttered the pan,
    and I cooked it in an oven that I had not used for cornbread
    before. The bread was kind-of tough, and the edges were even
    moreso. I am chagrined.

    --
    Jean B.

  12. #12
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: The 2011 Hatch Chile Thread

    Don Martinich wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >> I'm bummed that my garden didn't turn out this year. When I was out
    >> shopping for plants I ran across plants labeled 'Hatch' also some
    >> Freso, Anaheim and a couple other. I wanted to compare and see if
    >> there was a difference between Hatch and Anaheim. Of course, not a
    >> true test as the Hatch were not grown in NM.
    >> Janet US

    >
    > There seems to be some confusion about the name "Hatch". It's the name
    > of a town near the Rio Grande River in southern New Mexico and that
    > segment of the Rio Grande Valley. There is another chili growing area
    > downriver known as the Mesilla Valley and a town by that name. This
    > near Las Cruces. Both regions grow New Mexico chile varieties
    > developed by the Chili Pepper Institute of New Mexico State
    > University. Here is a list of the vareities bred by the institute:
    >
    > http://www.chilepepperinstitute.org/...ager/educ_info
    > /ChileCultof%20NMSU.pdf
    >
    > There is no reason why either Hatch or Mesilla should produce a better
    > pepper. On the other hand, the New Mexico varieties from either are
    > much more flavorful than any Anaheim. I always look forward to this
    > time of year when the NM chiles become available. As for red chiles,
    > my NM friends have always preferred ripe chiles, fresh or dried from
    > the northern part of the state. I have only had the dried peppers from
    > Chimayo which is north of Santa Fe. They made the best sauce. Really
    > outstanding.
    >
    > D.M.


    Anaheims are a variant of NuMex. I've posted cites on this in the past,
    notably from work by Jean Andrews. Perhaps the difference relates more to
    soil and growing conditions than genetics.

    MartyB



  13. #13
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: The 2011 Hatch Chile Thread

    On Sat, 6 Aug 2011 08:08:31 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    snip
    >
    >Anaheims are a variant of NuMex. I've posted cites on this in the past,
    >notably from work by Jean Andrews. Perhaps the difference relates more to
    >soil and growing conditions than genetics.
    >
    >MartyB
    >

    That is what I was hoping to find out by growing them in my garden
    this year.
    Janet US

  14. #14
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: The 2011 Hatch Chile Thread

    Janet Bostwick wrote:
    > On Sat, 6 Aug 2011 08:08:31 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > snip
    >>
    >> Anaheims are a variant of NuMex. I've posted cites on this in the
    >> past, notably from work by Jean Andrews. Perhaps the difference
    >> relates more to soil and growing conditions than genetics.
    >>
    >> MartyB
    >>

    > That is what I was hoping to find out by growing them in my garden
    > this year.
    > Janet US


    There's also the various varietals planted by commercial growers as opposed
    to those more suited to home and local gardening. It has more to do with
    days to maturity, storage time, and shipping hardiness than it does with
    taste. Commercial Anaheim peppers are presumably chosen for compatability
    with growing in and distributing from California.

    MartyB



  15. #15
    Don Martinich Guest

    Default Re: The 2011 Hatch Chile Thread

    In article <j1jecf$b51$[email protected]>,
    "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Don Martinich wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >> I'm bummed that my garden didn't turn out this year. When I was out
    > >> shopping for plants I ran across plants labeled 'Hatch' also some
    > >> Freso, Anaheim and a couple other. I wanted to compare and see if
    > >> there was a difference between Hatch and Anaheim. Of course, not a
    > >> true test as the Hatch were not grown in NM.
    > >> Janet US

    > >
    > > There seems to be some confusion about the name "Hatch". It's the name
    > > of a town near the Rio Grande River in southern New Mexico and that
    > > segment of the Rio Grande Valley. There is another chili growing area
    > > downriver known as the Mesilla Valley and a town by that name. This
    > > near Las Cruces. Both regions grow New Mexico chile varieties
    > > developed by the Chili Pepper Institute of New Mexico State
    > > University. Here is a list of the vareities bred by the institute:
    > >
    > > http://www.chilepepperinstitute.org/...ager/educ_info
    > > /ChileCultof%20NMSU.pdf
    > >
    > > There is no reason why either Hatch or Mesilla should produce a better
    > > pepper. On the other hand, the New Mexico varieties from either are
    > > much more flavorful than any Anaheim. I always look forward to this
    > > time of year when the NM chiles become available. As for red chiles,
    > > my NM friends have always preferred ripe chiles, fresh or dried from
    > > the northern part of the state. I have only had the dried peppers from
    > > Chimayo which is north of Santa Fe. They made the best sauce. Really
    > > outstanding.
    > >
    > > D.M.

    >
    > Anaheims are a variant of NuMex. I've posted cites on this in the past,
    > notably from work by Jean Andrews. Perhaps the difference relates more to
    > soil and growing conditions than genetics.
    >
    > MartyB


    The Anaheim is a chile from New Mexico brought to California in the
    1920's. I've never seen any information as to which cultivar it was. The
    growing environments are certainly different. The particular variety
    could make a big difference. Think about tomato varieties-

    D.M.

  16. #16
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: The 2011 Hatch Chile Thread

    Don Martinich wrote:
    > In article <j1jecf$b51$[email protected]>,
    > "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Don Martinich wrote:
    >>> In article <[email protected]>,
    >>> Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> I'm bummed that my garden didn't turn out this year. When I was
    >>>> out shopping for plants I ran across plants labeled 'Hatch' also
    >>>> some Freso, Anaheim and a couple other. I wanted to compare and
    >>>> see if there was a difference between Hatch and Anaheim. Of
    >>>> course, not a true test as the Hatch were not grown in NM.
    >>>> Janet US
    >>>
    >>> There seems to be some confusion about the name "Hatch". It's the
    >>> name of a town near the Rio Grande River in southern New Mexico and
    >>> that segment of the Rio Grande Valley. There is another chili
    >>> growing area downriver known as the Mesilla Valley and a town by
    >>> that name. This near Las Cruces. Both regions grow New Mexico chile
    >>> varieties developed by the Chili Pepper Institute of New Mexico
    >>> State University. Here is a list of the vareities bred by the
    >>> institute:
    >>>
    >>> http://www.chilepepperinstitute.org/...ager/educ_info
    >>> /ChileCultof%20NMSU.pdf
    >>>
    >>> There is no reason why either Hatch or Mesilla should produce a
    >>> better pepper. On the other hand, the New Mexico varieties from
    >>> either are much more flavorful than any Anaheim. I always look
    >>> forward to this time of year when the NM chiles become available.
    >>> As for red chiles, my NM friends have always preferred ripe chiles,
    >>> fresh or dried from the northern part of the state. I have only had
    >>> the dried peppers from Chimayo which is north of Santa Fe. They
    >>> made the best sauce. Really outstanding.
    >>>
    >>> D.M.

    >>
    >> Anaheims are a variant of NuMex. I've posted cites on this in the
    >> past, notably from work by Jean Andrews. Perhaps the difference
    >> relates more to soil and growing conditions than genetics.
    >>
    >> MartyB

    >
    > The Anaheim is a chile from New Mexico brought to California in the
    > 1920's. I've never seen any information as to which cultivar it was.
    > The growing environments are certainly different. The particular
    > variety could make a big difference. Think about tomato varieties-
    >
    > D.M.


    Earlier than that, actually, in 1900

    I dug out my old post on that subject based on Jean Andrews' research.
    https://groups.google.com/group/rec....8b9768a4059eb5

    Here's what I wrote if you don't want to go to Foogle Froups.
    ====================
    Jul 29 2010, 7:19 pm

    <preceding quotes clipped>

    Indeed Anaheims are descended from New Mexican chiles, as follows.

    As with most vegetables, there are a lot of varietals. It's actually far
    more complex than just Numex or Anaheim. As a general classification though,
    they are all cultivars of capsicum annuum var. annum Long Green/Red Chile.
    (Chile scientists in the industry apparently prefer separating the two, Long
    Green Chile or Long Red Chile, but they are the same, one immature, one
    ripe.)


    The Anaheim cultivar originated when a rancher moved from California to New
    Mexico in 1896 and became interested in chile crops. When he returned to CA
    he took seeds with him. He started a chile cannery in Anaheim in 1900. Seeds
    were first released under the Anaheim name in 1903.


    In New Mexico there was considerable angst over developing a variety that
    would peel easily. Eventually the base New Mexico varietal came into being,
    called New Mexico No. 9. It was the primary Numex pepper for many years.


    There are other cultivars in production. Cultivars you may see offered
    include California Chili, Chimayo, New Mexico No. 6, Rio Grande, and Sandia.


    A couple varieties I like in the home garden are NUMEX Big Jim and Joe
    Parker.


    Cite: "Peppers, The Domesticated Capsicums, Jean Andrews, University of
    Texas Press."


    MartyB




  17. #17
    Don Martinich Guest

    Default Re: The 2011 Hatch Chile Thread

    In article <j1m6g8$ae8$[email protected]>,
    "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote:

    (older posts deleted)
    > >> Anaheims are a variant of NuMex. I've posted cites on this in the
    > >> past, notably from work by Jean Andrews. Perhaps the difference
    > >> relates more to soil and growing conditions than genetics.
    > >>
    > >> MartyB

    > >
    > > The Anaheim is a chile from New Mexico brought to California in the
    > > 1920's. I've never seen any information as to which cultivar it was.
    > > The growing environments are certainly different. The particular
    > > variety could make a big difference. Think about tomato varieties-
    > >
    > > D.M.

    >
    > Earlier than that, actually, in 1900
    >
    > I dug out my old post on that subject based on Jean Andrews' research.
    > https://groups.google.com/group/rec....8b9768a4059eb5
    >
    > Here's what I wrote if you don't want to go to Foogle Froups.
    > ====================
    > Jul 29 2010, 7:19 pm
    >
    > <preceding quotes clipped>
    >
    > Indeed Anaheims are descended from New Mexican chiles, as follows.
    >
    > As with most vegetables, there are a lot of varietals. It's actually far
    > more complex than just Numex or Anaheim. As a general classification though,
    > they are all cultivars of capsicum annuum var. annum Long Green/Red Chile.
    > (Chile scientists in the industry apparently prefer separating the two, Long
    > Green Chile or Long Red Chile, but they are the same, one immature, one
    > ripe.)
    >
    >
    > The Anaheim cultivar originated when a rancher moved from California to New
    > Mexico in 1896 and became interested in chile crops. When he returned to CA
    > he took seeds with him. He started a chile cannery in Anaheim in 1900. Seeds
    > were first released under the Anaheim name in 1903.
    >
    >
    > In New Mexico there was considerable angst over developing a variety that
    > would peel easily. Eventually the base New Mexico varietal came into being,
    > called New Mexico No. 9. It was the primary Numex pepper for many years.
    >
    >
    > There are other cultivars in production. Cultivars you may see offered
    > include California Chili, Chimayo, New Mexico No. 6, Rio Grande, and Sandia.
    >
    >
    > A couple varieties I like in the home garden are NUMEX Big Jim and Joe
    > Parker.
    >
    >
    > Cite: "Peppers, The Domesticated Capsicums, Jean Andrews, University of
    > Texas Press."
    >
    >
    > MartyB


    Thanks for the repost. I got the 1920's date from the Ortega web site. I
    think we are all on the same track.

    D.M.

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