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Thread: (2010-03-26) Dietary restrictions?

  1. #1
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default (2010-03-26) Dietary restrictions?

    http://www.recfoodcooking.com
    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy

  2. #2
    Tracy Guest

    Default Re: (2010-03-26) Dietary restrictions?



    ChattyCathy wrote:
    > http://www.recfoodcooking.com


    No mention of Catholics? Can a person still be Catholic if they eat
    meat on Friday's during Lent? (That's the only food restriction I
    could think of for Catholics!) ;-)

    I know Jews who eat pork and still consider themselves Jewish. I
    know Muslims who drink and don't pray five times a day and still
    consider themselves Muslim.

    Whether or not they are "good" Catholics, Jews, or Muslims is
    another story.

    -Tracy


  3. #3
    sf Guest

    Default Re: (2010-03-26) Dietary restrictions?

    On Fri, 26 Mar 2010 20:00:29 +0200, ChattyCathy
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > http://www.recfoodcooking.com


    What happened to MCINL?


    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  4. #4
    Adam Funk Guest

    Default Re: (2010-03-26) Dietary restrictions?

    On 2010-03-26, Tracy wrote:

    > ChattyCathy wrote:
    >> http://www.recfoodcooking.com

    >
    > No mention of Catholics? Can a person still be Catholic if they eat
    > meat on Friday's during Lent? (That's the only food restriction I
    > could think of for Catholics!) ;-)


    AIUI, Roman Catholics no longer have to abstain from meat on most
    Fridays, but they are supposed to carry out some kind of abstinence or
    penitence. (Were RC vegetarians or pescatarians considered to be
    abstaining all the time in the old days?)

    (I'm not RC and I don't generally eat meat, but I love seafood. So
    for me fish is a treat rather than abstinence.)


    --
    Do you know what they do to book thieves up at Santa Rita?
    http://www.shigabooks.com/indeces/bookhunter.html

  5. #5
    Virginia Tadrzynski Guest

    Default Re: (2010-03-26) Dietary restrictions?


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Fri, 26 Mar 2010 20:00:29 +0200, ChattyCathy
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> http://www.recfoodcooking.com

    >
    > What happened to MCINL?
    >
    >
    > --
    > Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.



    I second this. I know plenty of people who consider themselves Jewish and I
    am privy to their dining habits. On the other hand, although I know a few
    people who are Muslim, their dining habits I am not privy to. I think it is
    between the believer and their god.
    -ginny



  6. #6
    sf Guest

    Default Re: (2010-03-26) Dietary restrictions?

    On Fri, 26 Mar 2010 18:35:19 -0400, "Virginia Tadrzynski"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I second this. I know plenty of people who consider themselves Jewish and I
    > am privy to their dining habits. On the other hand, although I know a few
    > people who are Muslim, their dining habits I am not privy to. I think it is
    > between the believer and their god.


    I got stuck at Muslim too. I don't think I know any. If I do, the
    topic of their religion and religious dietary restrictions hasn't come
    up.

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  7. #7
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: (2010-03-26) Dietary restrictions?


    "ChattyCathy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:2D6rn.10638$[email protected]..
    > http://www.recfoodcooking.com



    For the first time I couldn't answer a single question in the poll. lol


  8. #8
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: (2010-03-26) Dietary restrictions?

    On Mar 26, 2:00*pm, ChattyCathy <cathy1...@mailinator.com> wrote:
    > http://www.recfoodcooking.com
    > --
    > Cheers
    > Chatty Cathy


    "No opinion" or "No knowledge" should have been answer options. It
    was difficult to answer and probably skewed the results.

    And what or who defines a 'good' Muslim, Catholic etc.? Could be
    debated ad nauseam.

  9. #9
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: (2010-03-26) Dietary restrictions?

    Kalmia wrote:
    > On Mar 26, 2:00 pm, ChattyCathy <cathy1...@mailinator.com> wrote:
    >> http://www.recfoodcooking.com
    >> --
    >> Cheers
    >> Chatty Cathy

    >
    > "No opinion" or "No knowledge" should have been answer options. It
    > was difficult to answer and probably skewed the results.



    People who would choose those answers probably should have skipped this
    survey.


    > And what or who defines a 'good' Muslim, Catholic etc.? Could be
    > debated ad nauseam.


    Good = observant.

    gloria p

  10. #10
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: (2010-03-26) Dietary restrictions?

    On Fri, 26 Mar 2010 17:56:34 -0700 (PDT), Kalmia
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Mar 26, 2:00*pm, ChattyCathy <cathy1...@mailinator.com> wrote:
    >> http://www.recfoodcooking.com
    >> --
    >> Cheers
    >> Chatty Cathy

    >
    >"No opinion" or "No knowledge" should have been answer options. It
    >was difficult to answer and probably skewed the results.
    >
    >And what or who defines a 'good' Muslim, Catholic etc.? Could be
    >debated ad nauseam.


    Greg never had a problem defining a 'good' muslim.



  11. #11
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: (2010-03-26) Dietary restrictions?


    "brooklyn1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..


    >
    > Greg never had a problem defining a 'good' muslim.
    >
    >

    He's not really dead, right?


  12. #12
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default Re: (2010-03-26) Dietary restrictions?

    Virginia Tadrzynski wrote:

    >
    > "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> On Fri, 26 Mar 2010 20:00:29 +0200, ChattyCathy
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> http://www.recfoodcooking.com

    >>
    >> What happened to MCINL?


    It went to Mosque...
    >
    >
    > I second this. I know plenty of people who consider themselves Jewish
    > and I
    > am privy to their dining habits.


    You've hit the nail on the head, ginny - "people who *consider*
    themselves to be Jewish...

    > On the other hand, although I know a
    > few
    > people who are Muslim, their dining habits I am not privy to. I think
    > it is between the believer and their god.
    > -ginny


    Whether you are privy to any particular Muslims' dining habits or not,
    it's fairly common knowledge that Muslims are not supposed to drink
    and/or cook with alcohol (or eat pork either, BTW) because Islam
    forbids it.

    Here's a little story I saw recently about the Dubai municipality
    attempting to ban restaurants from cooking with alcohol - which luckily
    for the non-Muslims living/working/visiting there was retracted...

    http://www.news24.com/Content/World/...l_back_in_food

    or
    http://tinyurl.com/y88o7te

    I can't help but get the feeling that some people think of the
    terms "Jewish" and "Muslim" as if they were the names of
    certain 'races'. They're not. They're just two of the many religions
    out there - and one is free to switch to another religion, become
    agnostic or even become an atheist if one thinks that the doctrine of
    certain religion(s) is unacceptable to them.
    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy

  13. #13
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: (2010-03-26) Dietary restrictions?

    On Sat, 27 Mar 2010 11:59:40 +0200, ChattyCathy
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >I can't help but get the feeling that some people think of the
    >terms "Jewish" and "Muslim" as if they were the names of
    >certain 'races'. They're not. They're just two of the many religions
    >out there - and one is free to switch to another religion, become
    >agnostic or even become an atheist if one thinks that the doctrine of
    >certain religion(s) is unacceptable to them.


    And more importantly, there are many, many sects within each of these
    two religions, just as there are within Christianity. Each of these
    sects believes, of course, that it is the One True Path and they all
    differ greatly in a lot more ways than dietary habits.

    Boron

  14. #14
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default Re: (2010-03-26) Dietary restrictions?

    Boron Elgar wrote:

    > On Sat, 27 Mar 2010 11:59:40 +0200, ChattyCathy
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>I can't help but get the feeling that some people think of the
    >>terms "Jewish" and "Muslim" as if they were the names of
    >>certain 'races'. They're not. They're just two of the many religions
    >>out there - and one is free to switch to another religion, become
    >>agnostic or even become an atheist if one thinks that the doctrine of
    >>certain religion(s) is unacceptable to them.

    >
    > And more importantly, there are many, many sects within each of these
    > two religions, just as there are within Christianity. Each of these
    > sects believes, of course, that it is the One True Path and they all
    > differ greatly in a lot more ways than dietary habits.


    Indeed. I even know some Christian people whose sect (as you so aptly
    put it) don't believe in eating pork either. I don't feel the same way
    they do - but I wouldn't dream of offering pork to them in my house; it
    would be disrespectful to do so, IMHO.
    --
    Cheers
    Chatty "agnostic" Cathy

  15. #15
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: (2010-03-26) Dietary restrictions?

    In article <wGkrn.110288$[email protected]>,
    ChattyCathy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I can't help but get the feeling that some people think of the
    > terms "Jewish" and "Muslim" as if they were the names of
    > certain 'races'. They're not. They're just two of the many religions
    > out there - and one is free to switch to another religion, become
    > agnostic or even become an atheist if one thinks that the doctrine of
    > certain religion(s) is unacceptable to them.
    > --
    > Cheers
    > Chatty Cathy


    I disagree with this somewhat. While Muslim is a religion only, not an
    ethnicity, Jewish most certainly is:

    <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jews>

    I guess you could switch the term to "Hebrew".
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "We're all adults here, except for those of us who aren't." --Blake Murphy

  16. #16
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: (2010-03-26) Dietary restrictions?

    In article <ddorn.13827$[email protected]>,
    ChattyCathy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Boron Elgar wrote:
    >
    > > On Sat, 27 Mar 2010 11:59:40 +0200, ChattyCathy
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >>
    > >>I can't help but get the feeling that some people think of the
    > >>terms "Jewish" and "Muslim" as if they were the names of
    > >>certain 'races'. They're not. They're just two of the many religions
    > >>out there - and one is free to switch to another religion, become
    > >>agnostic or even become an atheist if one thinks that the doctrine of
    > >>certain religion(s) is unacceptable to them.

    > >
    > > And more importantly, there are many, many sects within each of these
    > > two religions, just as there are within Christianity. Each of these
    > > sects believes, of course, that it is the One True Path and they all
    > > differ greatly in a lot more ways than dietary habits.

    >
    > Indeed. I even know some Christian people whose sect (as you so aptly
    > put it) don't believe in eating pork either. I don't feel the same way
    > they do - but I wouldn't dream of offering pork to them in my house; it
    > would be disrespectful to do so, IMHO.


    I know some people who don't eat pork simply because they consider it to
    be unhealthy. Shrimp and farmed salmon for the same reason. This
    particular couple gets to help me plan the menu when they eat over to
    make it easier for me to make a decision as to what to serve them.

    I truly, truly do not mind doing this for them. When I cook for others,
    I cook for others and take just as much pleasure in doing so as I do
    when I cook for self or family, and they are always profusely
    appreciative. :-)

    The last couple of times, they have brought organic produce from their
    garden and helped prep it as part of the meal, and they always make sure
    they bring a green that _I_ like as they now know that I don't care for
    Collards or Turnip greens. <g> I can be picky too sometimes!
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "We're all adults here, except for those of us who aren't." --Blake Murphy

  17. #17
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default Re: (2010-03-26) Dietary restrictions?

    Omelet wrote:

    > In article <wGkrn.110288$[email protected]>,
    > ChattyCathy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I can't help but get the feeling that some people think of the
    >> terms "Jewish" and "Muslim" as if they were the names of
    >> certain 'races'. They're not. They're just two of the many religions
    >> out there - and one is free to switch to another religion, become
    >> agnostic or even become an atheist if one thinks that the doctrine of
    >> certain religion(s) is unacceptable to them.

    >
    > I disagree with this somewhat. While Muslim is a religion only, not an
    > ethnicity, Jewish most certainly is:
    >
    > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jews>
    >
    > I guess you could switch the term to "Hebrew".


    And I disagree with you somewhat <eg>

    To quote your source: "Converts to Judaism, whose status as Jews within
    the Jewish ethnos is equal to those born into it, have been absorbed
    into the Jewish people throughout the millennia."

    So... if I decided to convert to Judaism tomorrow, for example, how
    would that change my *biological* race, may I humbly ask?
    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy

  18. #18
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: (2010-03-26) Dietary restrictions?

    In article <0Qqrn.58826$[email protected]>,
    ChattyCathy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > I disagree with this somewhat. While Muslim is a religion only, not an
    > > ethnicity, Jewish most certainly is:
    > >
    > > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jews>
    > >
    > > I guess you could switch the term to "Hebrew".

    >
    > And I disagree with you somewhat <eg>
    >
    > To quote your source: "Converts to Judaism, whose status as Jews within
    > the Jewish ethnos is equal to those born into it, have been absorbed
    > into the Jewish people throughout the millennia."
    >
    > So... if I decided to convert to Judaism tomorrow, for example, how
    > would that change my *biological* race, may I humbly ask?
    > --
    > Cheers
    > Chatty Cathy


    It's just that, Historically, Jews and Hebrews seem to be synonymous. :-)
    I guess that no longer applies in modern times...
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "We're all adults here, except for those of us who aren't." --Blake Murphy

  19. #19
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: (2010-03-26) Dietary restrictions?

    In article <ddorn.13827$[email protected]>,
    ChattyCathy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Boron Elgar wrote:
    >
    > > On Sat, 27 Mar 2010 11:59:40 +0200, ChattyCathy
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >>
    > >>I can't help but get the feeling that some people think of the
    > >>terms "Jewish" and "Muslim" as if they were the names of
    > >>certain 'races'. They're not. They're just two of the many religions
    > >>out there - and one is free to switch to another religion, become
    > >>agnostic or even become an atheist if one thinks that the doctrine of
    > >>certain religion(s) is unacceptable to them.


    Yes, I agree. Judaism, Christianity and Muslim are not races, just
    different religions. Furthermore, they all started in the same place
    and share a cultural heritage.

    > > And more importantly, there are many, many sects within each of these
    > > two religions, just as there are within Christianity. Each of these
    > > sects believes, of course, that it is the One True Path and they all
    > > differ greatly in a lot more ways than dietary habits.

    >
    > Indeed. I even know some Christian people whose sect (as you so aptly
    > put it) don't believe in eating pork either.


    In fact, for those who are strict Biblical literalists, it says pretty
    clearly in the Bible, in the Old Testament (Leviticus 11), no pork, no
    shellfish. So, all Christians either need to give up pork and
    shellfish, or figure out a way to weasel around what the Bible clearly
    says. Most of them choose to ignore it. That's fine, it doesn't seem
    applicable. Just don't come quoting some other part of Leviticus, taken
    out of context, and try to say that "it's in the Bible, therefore it's
    true".

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  20. #20
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: (2010-03-26) Dietary restrictions?

    On 3/27/2010 10:56 AM, Omelet wrote:
    > In article<ddorn.13827$[email protected]>,
    > ChattyCathy<[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Boron Elgar wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Sat, 27 Mar 2010 11:59:40 +0200, ChattyCathy
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>> I can't help but get the feeling that some people think of the
    >>>> terms "Jewish" and "Muslim" as if they were the names of
    >>>> certain 'races'. They're not. They're just two of the many religions
    >>>> out there - and one is free to switch to another religion, become
    >>>> agnostic or even become an atheist if one thinks that the doctrine of
    >>>> certain religion(s) is unacceptable to them.
    >>>
    >>> And more importantly, there are many, many sects within each of these
    >>> two religions, just as there are within Christianity. Each of these
    >>> sects believes, of course, that it is the One True Path and they all
    >>> differ greatly in a lot more ways than dietary habits.

    >>
    >> Indeed. I even know some Christian people whose sect (as you so aptly
    >> put it) don't believe in eating pork either. I don't feel the same way
    >> they do - but I wouldn't dream of offering pork to them in my house; it
    >> would be disrespectful to do so, IMHO.

    >
    > I know some people who don't eat pork simply because they consider it to
    > be unhealthy. Shrimp and farmed salmon for the same reason. This
    > particular couple gets to help me plan the menu when they eat over to
    > make it easier for me to make a decision as to what to serve them.
    >
    > I truly, truly do not mind doing this for them. When I cook for others,
    > I cook for others and take just as much pleasure in doing so as I do
    > when I cook for self or family, and they are always profusely
    > appreciative. :-)
    >
    > The last couple of times, they have brought organic produce from their
    > garden and helped prep it as part of the meal, and they always make sure
    > they bring a green that _I_ like as they now know that I don't care for
    > Collards or Turnip greens.<g> I can be picky too sometimes!


    If you can get hold of the greens from the Tokyo Cross turnip you might
    change your mind. I never liked the purple top greens and still won't
    eat the root (I'm worse than Barb is about beets)unless it is pickled,
    which I like right well, or raw, which I also like. Cooked turnips
    always taste bad to me. The Tokyo Cross turnips are pure white and the
    greens are tender and delicious.

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