Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 49

Thread: (2009-09-29) NS-RFC: Oleo?

  1. #1
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default (2009-09-29) NS-RFC: Oleo?

    http://www.recfoodcooking.com

    James Silverton wrote (in another thread):

    >Hello All!


    >I saw a recipe in r.f.recipes that called for oleo or butter. Am I
    >correct in saying that oleo means margerine? Perhaps ChattyCathy might
    >think it worthy of a survey.


    James, your wish is my command ;-)
    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy

  2. #2
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: (2009-09-29) NS-RFC: Oleo?

    ChattyCathy wrote on Tue, 29 Sep 2009 19:30:22 +0200:

    > James Silverton wrote (in another thread):


    >> Hello All!


    >> I saw a recipe in r.f.recipes that called for oleo or butter.
    >> Am I correct in saying that oleo means margerine? Perhaps
    >> ChattyCathy might think it worthy of a survey.


    > James, your wish is my command ;-)


    Thanks, that was fast! I won't try to win the hat since I'd like to see
    what others think.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  3. #3
    Terry Guest

    Default Re: (2009-09-29) NS-RFC: Oleo?

    On Tue, 29 Sep 2009 13:35:08 -0400, "James Silverton"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > ChattyCathy wrote on Tue, 29 Sep 2009 19:30:22 +0200:
    >
    >> James Silverton wrote (in another thread):

    >
    >>> Hello All!

    >
    >>> I saw a recipe in r.f.recipes that called for oleo or butter.
    >>> Am I correct in saying that oleo means margerine? Perhaps
    >>> ChattyCathy might think it worthy of a survey.

    >
    >> James, your wish is my command ;-)

    >
    >Thanks, that was fast! I won't try to win the hat since I'd like to see
    >what others think.


    Doggone it, some of you people are FAST. I had just got off the site
    with the old survey, downloaded groups, saw a new survey, went back to
    the site... and I was #3...

    Terry

  4. #4
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: (2009-09-29) NS-RFC: Oleo?


    "ChattyCathy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:7vrwm.112101$[email protected]..
    > http://www.recfoodcooking.com
    >
    > James Silverton wrote (in another thread):
    >
    >>Hello All!

    >
    >>I saw a recipe in r.f.recipes that called for oleo or butter. Am I
    >>correct in saying that oleo means margerine? Perhaps ChattyCathy might
    >>think it worthy of a survey.

    >
    > James, your wish is my command ;-)
    > --
    > Cheers
    > Chatty Cathy


    read here for the history;

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margarine

    In 1869 Emperor Louis Napoleon III of France offered a prize to anyone who
    could make a satisfactory substitute for butter, suitable for use by the
    armed forces and the lower classes.[1] French chemist Hippolyte Mège-Mouriés
    invented a substance he called oleomargarine, the name of which became
    shortened to the trade name "Margarine". Margarine now refers generically to
    any of a range of broadly similar edible oils. The name oleomargarine is
    sometimes abbreviated to oleo.


    --
    Dimitri
    Coming soon:
    http://kitchenguide.wordpress.com.


  5. #5
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: (2009-09-29) NS-RFC: Oleo?

    On Sep 29, 1:15*pm, "Dimitri" <Dimitr...@prodigy.net> wrote:
    > "ChattyCathy" <cathy1...@mailinator.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:7vrwm.112101$Y83.6538@newsfe21.ia[email protected]..
    >
    > >http://www.recfoodcooking.com

    >
    > > James Silverton wrote (in another thread):

    >
    > >>Hello All!

    >
    > >>I saw a recipe in r.f.recipes that called for oleo or butter. Am I
    > >>correct in saying that oleo means margerine? Perhaps ChattyCathy might
    > >>think it worthy of a survey.

    >
    > > James, your wish is my command ;-)
    > > --
    > > Cheers
    > > Chatty Cathy

    >
    > read here for the history;
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margarine
    >
    > In 1869 Emperor Louis Napoleon III of France offered a prize to anyone who
    > could make a satisfactory substitute for butter, suitable for use by the
    > armed forces and the lower classes.[1] French chemist Hippolyte Mège-Mouriés
    > invented a substance he called oleomargarine, the name of which became
    > shortened to the trade name "Margarine". Margarine now refers genericallyto
    > any of a range of broadly similar edible oils. The name oleomargarine is
    > sometimes abbreviated to oleo.


    Oleomargarine is still suitable only for ignorant, dirty folks.
    >
    > --
    > Dimitri


    --Bryan


  6. #6
    Cindy Hamilton Guest

    Default Re: (2009-09-29) NS-RFC: Oleo?

    On Sep 29, 1:35*pm, "James Silverton" <not.jim.silver...@verizon.net>
    wrote:
    > *ChattyCathy *wrote *on Tue, 29 Sep 2009 19:30:22 +0200:
    >
    > > James Silverton wrote (in another thread):
    > >> Hello All!
    > >> I saw a recipe in r.f.recipes that called for oleo or butter.
    > >> Am I correct in saying that oleo means margerine? Perhaps
    > >> ChattyCathy might think it worthy of a survey.

    > > James, your wish is my command ;-)

    >
    > Thanks, that was fast! I won't try to win the hat since I'd like to see
    > what others think.


    Actor Victor Buono wrote a poem entitled, "The Fat Man's Prayer".
    Here's
    an excerpt:

    And show me the light that I may bear witness
    To the President's Council on Physical Fitness.
    At oleomargarine I'll never mutter,
    For the road to hell is spread with butter.

    Cindy Hamilton

  7. #7
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: (2009-09-29) NS-RFC: Oleo?

    On Tue, 29 Sep 2009 11:55:12 -0700 (PDT), Bryan <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sep 29, 1:15*pm, "Dimitri" <Dimitr...@prodigy.net> wrote:
    >> "ChattyCathy" <cathy1...@mailinator.com> wrote in message
    >>
    >> news:7vrwm.112101$[email protected]..
    >>
    >> >http://www.recfoodcooking.com

    >>
    >> > James Silverton wrote (in another thread):

    >>
    >> >>Hello All!

    >>
    >> >>I saw a recipe in r.f.recipes that called for oleo or butter. Am I
    >> >>correct in saying that oleo means margerine? Perhaps ChattyCathy might
    >> >>think it worthy of a survey.

    >>
    >> > James, your wish is my command ;-)
    >> > --
    >> > Cheers
    >> > Chatty Cathy

    >>
    >> read here for the history;
    >>
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margarine
    >>
    >> In 1869 Emperor Louis Napoleon III of France offered a prize to anyone who
    >> could make a satisfactory substitute for butter, suitable for use by the
    >> armed forces and the lower classes.[1] French chemist Hippolyte Mège-Mouriés
    >> invented a substance he called oleomargarine, the name of which became
    >> shortened to the trade name "Margarine". Margarine now refers generically to
    >> any of a range of broadly similar edible oils. The name oleomargarine is
    >> sometimes abbreviated to oleo.

    >
    >Oleomargarine is still suitable only for ignorant, dirty folks.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Dimitri

    >
    >--Bryan

    A-h-h-h-h go eat a batch of hardtop garden slugs (escargot). Brian you're a
    certifiable foodsnob twit.



  8. #8
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: (2009-09-29) NS-RFC: Oleo?

    On Tue, 29 Sep 2009 11:15:37 -0700, Dimitri wrote:

    > "ChattyCathy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:7vrwm.112101$[email protected]..
    >> http://www.recfoodcooking.com
    >>
    >> James Silverton wrote (in another thread):
    >>
    >>>Hello All!

    >>
    >>>I saw a recipe in r.f.recipes that called for oleo or butter. Am I
    >>>correct in saying that oleo means margerine? Perhaps ChattyCathy might
    >>>think it worthy of a survey.

    >>
    >> James, your wish is my command ;-)
    >> --
    >> Cheers
    >> Chatty Cathy

    >
    > read here for the history;
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margarine
    >
    > In 1869 Emperor Louis Napoleon III of France offered a prize to anyone who
    > could make a satisfactory substitute for butter, suitable for use by the
    > armed forces and the lower classes.


    <snort>

    your pal,
    blake

  9. #9
    Fritz Tynan Guest

    Default Re: (2009-09-29) NS-RFC: Oleo?

    ChattyCathy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > http://www.recfoodcooking.com
    >
    > James Silverton wrote (in another thread):
    >
    > >Hello All!

    >
    > >I saw a recipe in r.f.recipes that called for oleo or butter. Am I
    > >correct in saying that oleo means margerine? Perhaps ChattyCathy might
    > >think it worthy of a survey.

    >
    > James, your wish is my command ;-)


    I was first . I already have two TFH's but only one head so I concede my
    good fortune to the next in line.

    BTW I use both depending on the application.


    --
    Talk atcha later,
    Fritz Tynan-Seattle, WA

  10. #10
    Dimitri Guest

    Default OT Oleo story?


    "blake murphy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    newsamfxvcmn780$.j3teuphebty$.[email protected]..


    >> In 1869 Emperor Louis Napoleon III of France offered a prize to anyone
    >> who
    >> could make a satisfactory substitute for butter, suitable for use by the
    >> armed forces and the lower classes.

    >
    > <snort>
    >
    > your pal,
    > blake


    It's little difficult to write about properly but margarine got me thrown
    out of my Grand Aunt's home as a child.
    Thalia was a coloratura with the Met in the 20's and 30's - She was for all
    intents and purposes a diva or prim donna.

    Being a native of Hollywood - a first born American we were talking and I
    asked for her to pass the margarine (pronounced American style) She said
    "it's pronounced Mar-gure-ine (French style)" I said not it's not it's
    Margarine. She said - It's a French invention and repronouned the word. I
    started to argue at which time she called me a peasant and told me to GET
    OUT until I could show some respect.

    LOL.....

    --
    Dimitri
    Coming soon:
    http://kitchenguide.wordpress.com.



  11. #11
    Silvar Beitel Guest

    Default Re: (2009-09-29) NS-RFC: Oleo?

    On Sep 29, 1:30 pm, ChattyCathy <cathy1...@mailinator.com> wrote:
    > http://www.recfoodcooking.com
    >
    > James Silverton wrote (in another thread):
    >
    > >Hello All!
    > >I saw a recipe in r.f.recipes that called for oleo or butter. Am I
    > >correct in saying that oleo means margerine? Perhaps ChattyCathy might
    > >think it worthy of a survey.


    As a kid growing up in northern Illinois with parents vacationing
    occasionally in Wisconsin, I remember the huge "OLEO" signs along the
    border on the Illinois side advertising margarine at convenience
    stores there. You couldn't buy it in Wisconsin at the time, a dairy-
    protectionist thing.

    --
    Silvar Beitel

  12. #12
    Kathleen Guest

    Default Re: OT Oleo story?

    Dimitri wrote:

    >
    > "blake murphy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > newsamfxvcmn780$.j3teuphebty$.[email protected]..
    >
    >
    >>> In 1869 Emperor Louis Napoleon III of France offered a prize to
    >>> anyone who
    >>> could make a satisfactory substitute for butter, suitable for use by the
    >>> armed forces and the lower classes.

    >>
    >>
    >> <snort>
    >>
    >> your pal,
    >> blake

    >
    >
    > It's little difficult to write about properly but margarine got me
    > thrown out of my Grand Aunt's home as a child.
    > Thalia was a coloratura with the Met in the 20's and 30's - She was for
    > all intents and purposes a diva or prim donna.
    >
    > Being a native of Hollywood - a first born American we were talking and
    > I asked for her to pass the margarine (pronounced American style) She
    > said "it's pronounced Mar-gure-ine (French style)" I said not it's not
    > it's Margarine. She said - It's a French invention and repronouned the
    > word. I started to argue at which time she called me a peasant and told
    > me to GET OUT until I could show some respect.
    >
    > LOL.....
    >


    Margarine got me smacked upside the head as a child.

    It was and is flat out nasty and back in the 60s there was no such
    obvious warning indicator as lack of yellow coloration. And my mother
    would periodically buy that oleoginous crap, at random, for no specific
    reason that I could discern. Maybe it was on sale. Like I said, there
    was no obvious pattern.

    So anyhow, we were eating dinner one evening and there was stick of
    something rather unnaturally yellow in the butter dish. It was passed
    to me along with the loaf of bread. I asked my mother what it was and
    she declared, irritably, that it was "butter". Meaning in mom-speak,
    something yellow and greasy that you smear on bread.

    Being a picky and analytical child, I peered closely at the stick, then
    lifted the dish up and sniffed it. Blech! Margarine. I'd thought so.

    I started to push the "butter" dish and the bread on when my mother's
    hand shot out and whacked me upside the head. Apparently it's rude to
    decline revolting synthetic food, even after you've politely requested
    information on exactly what it was.




  13. #13
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: OT Oleo story?

    Kathleen wrote:

    > Margarine got me smacked upside the head as a child.
    >
    > It was and is flat out nasty and back in the 60s there was no such
    > obvious warning indicator as lack of yellow coloration. And my mother
    > would periodically buy that oleoginous crap, at random, for no specific
    > reason that I could discern. Maybe it was on sale. Like I said, there
    > was no obvious pattern.
    >
    > So anyhow, we were eating dinner one evening and there was stick of
    > something rather unnaturally yellow in the butter dish. It was passed
    > to me along with the loaf of bread. I asked my mother what it was and
    > she declared, irritably, that it was "butter". Meaning in mom-speak,
    > something yellow and greasy that you smear on bread.
    >
    > Being a picky and analytical child, I peered closely at the stick, then
    > lifted the dish up and sniffed it. Blech! Margarine. I'd thought so.
    >
    > I started to push the "butter" dish and the bread on when my mother's
    > hand shot out and whacked me upside the head. Apparently it's rude to
    > decline revolting synthetic food, even after you've politely requested
    > information on exactly what it was.
    >


    Sounds like you were a difficult child. OTOH, the slap to the head for
    minor infractions is classic pre-70s child rearing at it's very finest.
    :-)

    My understanding is that when margarine first came out, it was unlawful
    to have a yellow coloring lest it be mistaken for butter. You'd have to
    manually mix yellow into that disgusting white greasy substance in order
    to get yellow greasy disgusting substance. I think I'd enjoy that.

  14. #14
    Michel Boucher Guest

    Default Re: (2009-09-29) NS-RFC: Oleo?

    "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:b9swm.4054$[email protected]:

    > In 1869 Emperor Louis Napoleon III of France offered a prize to anyone
    > who could make a satisfactory substitute for butter, suitable for use
    > by the armed forces and the lower classes.


    During WWII, butter was severely rationed in North America (as my mother
    told it) on the pretext that it was being used for the troops. My mother
    was in Chicago at the time the war ended and she said they had not seen
    butter or chicken in two years by the time my parents returned to Montréal.

    At any rate, I seriously doubt all (if any at all) of the butter went to
    the troops. Omar Bradley writes in his memoir, A Soldier's Story, that US
    troops were supplied with a tinned oleaginous substance called "Marfak No.
    1" (NB: Marfak also manufactured axle grease and other industrial
    lubricants).

    They set about requisitioning the German tubes of Danish butter which were
    standard issue of the Wehrmacht.

    "We quickly commandeered as much of it as we could find. But at the same
    time, we rejected the British bully beef that had been captured by the
    Germans a year or two before only to be recaptured by us."

    (1) Bradley, Omar N., A Soldier's Story, Random House: New York, 1999, page
    98.

    --

    Capitalism is the astounding belief that the most wickedest
    of men will do the most wickedest of things for the greatest
    good of everyone. - John Maynard Keynes

  15. #15
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: OT Oleo story?

    In article <6GQwm.80248$[email protected]>,
    Kathleen <[email protected]> wrote:


    > It was and is flat out nasty and back in the 60s there was no such
    > obvious warning indicator as lack of yellow coloration.


    What state do you live in?

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  16. #16
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: (2009-09-29) NS-RFC: Oleo?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Michel Boucher <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:b9swm.4054$[email protected]:


    > During WWII, butter was severely rationed in North America (as my mother
    > told it) on the pretext that it was being used for the troops.


    I wasn't even born then, but I'm skeptical that the butter, a substance
    which doesn't keep well, all went to the troops. I suspect that all the
    countries involved in the war were strapped for cash, and the butter was
    sold to countries not involved in the war, for money or materials that
    could be used in the war effort.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  17. #17
    Felice Guest

    Default Re: OT Oleo story?


    "dsi1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:7SQwm.75877$[email protected]..
    >
    > My understanding is that when margarine first came out, it was unlawful to
    > have a yellow coloring lest it be mistaken for butter. You'd have to
    > manually mix yellow into that disgusting white greasy substance in order
    > to get yellow greasy disgusting substance. I think I'd enjoy that.


    Yep. My kid brother enjoyed his household chore of mixing the contents of
    that yellow capsule into the white margarine. And then one day he used blue
    food coloring instead. Really nasty, but it was rationed and so we used it.

    Felice



  18. #18
    Michel Boucher Guest

    Default Re: (2009-09-29) NS-RFC: Oleo?

    Dan Abel <[email protected]> wrote in news:dabel-9A2D6F.15530430092009@c-61-
    68-245-199.per.connect.net.au:

    > I suspect that all the
    > countries involved in the war were strapped for cash, and the butter was
    > sold to countries not involved in the war, for money or materials that
    > could be used in the war effort.


    You mean countries NOT producing their own butter? Generally, if butter is
    an important part of your diet, you have the means to produce it. More
    likely they destroyed it rather than letting it fall into the hands of the
    bread eaters :-)

    --

    Capitalism is the astounding belief that the most wickedest
    of men will do the most wickedest of things for the greatest
    good of everyone. - John Maynard Keynes

  19. #19
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: OT Oleo story?

    In article <ha0nh3$hgk$[email protected]>,
    "Felice" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "dsi1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:7SQwm.75877$[email protected]..
    > >
    > > My understanding is that when margarine first came out, it was unlawful to
    > > have a yellow coloring lest it be mistaken for butter. You'd have to
    > > manually mix yellow into that disgusting white greasy substance in order
    > > to get yellow greasy disgusting substance. I think I'd enjoy that.

    >
    > Yep. My kid brother enjoyed his household chore of mixing the contents of
    > that yellow capsule into the white margarine. And then one day he used blue
    > food coloring instead. Really nasty, but it was rationed and so we used it.


    Your brother was late:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margarine

    "In several states, the legislature enacted laws to require margarine
    manufacturers to add pink colorings to make the product look
    unpalatable,[2] but the Supreme Court struck down New Hampshire's law
    and overruled these measures."

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  20. #20
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: OT Oleo story?

    dsi1 wrote:

    > My understanding is that when margarine first came out, it was unlawful
    > to have a yellow coloring lest it be mistaken for butter. You'd have to
    > manually mix yellow into that disgusting white greasy substance in order
    > to get yellow greasy disgusting substance. I think I'd enjoy that.


    It has to do with the Oleomargarine Act of 1886 that penalized
    producers of margarine that had been artificially coloured to look like
    butter. However, the natural colour of butter varies, depending on a
    number of variables, and producers of butter were able to use artificial
    colouring to make their butter a more consistent colour. It seems silly
    to prohibit the makers of margarine from using dyes to make their
    product look like butter when the butter is dyed. We had similar laws in
    Canada and still do in Quebec.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32