Results 1 to 17 of 17

Thread: (2008-03-01) Who has made something that 'looked good' in print...

  1. #1
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default (2008-03-01) Who has made something that 'looked good' in print...

    http://www.recfoodcooking.com/

    Thanks go to Virginia Tadrzynski (ginny) for this survey.
    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy

    Food is an important part of a balanced diet. - Fran Lebowitz

  2. #2
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: (2008-03-01) Who has made something that 'looked good' in print...

    ChattyCathy wrote on Sat, 01 Mar 2008 16:35:38 +0200:

    C> http://www.recfoodcooking.com/

    C> Thanks go to Virginia Tadrzynski (ginny) for this survey.

    I did answer yes to being turned off by the results of a
    published good-looking recipe but more commonly the dish turns
    out to be uninteresting and not worth repeating.


    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    E-mail, with obvious alterations:
    not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  3. #3
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: (2008-03-01) Who has made something that 'looked good' in print...

    On Sat, 01 Mar 2008 16:35:38 +0200, ChattyCathy
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >http://www.recfoodcooking.com/
    >
    >Thanks go to Virginia Tadrzynski (ginny) for this survey.


    Recently I made a waffle recipe that looked like the trouble might be
    worth it. It had 11 ingredients. It called for a mix of milk and
    buttermilk, separating the eggs, whipping the whites, and folding them
    in at the end. A box mix would have provided better results. Next
    time I'll just use a plain simple recipe.

    Lou

  4. #4
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: (2008-03-01) Who has made something that 'looked good' in print...

    Pete wrote on Sat, 01 Mar 2008 08:59:39 -0600:

    PC> ChattyCathy wrote:
    ??>>
    ??>> http://www.recfoodcooking.com/
    ??>>
    ??>> Thanks go to Virginia Tadrzynski (ginny) for this survey.

    PC> Never. I'm good enough at analyzing a recipe
    PC> and assessing the likely results to avoid any terrible
    PC> results, and indeed anticipate deficiencies and adjust the
    PC> recipe to compensate.

    Good for you Pete! I wish I had your abilities and confidence
    :-)

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    E-mail, with obvious alterations:
    not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  5. #5
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: (2008-03-01) Who has made something that 'looked good' in print...

    On Sat, 01 Mar 2008 15:04:39 GMT, "James Silverton"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Pete wrote on Sat, 01 Mar 2008 08:59:39 -0600:
    >
    > PC> ChattyCathy wrote:
    > ??>>
    > ??>> http://www.recfoodcooking.com/
    > ??>>
    > ??>> Thanks go to Virginia Tadrzynski (ginny) for this survey.
    >
    >PC> Never. I'm good enough at analyzing a recipe
    >PC> and assessing the likely results to avoid any terrible
    >PC> results, and indeed anticipate deficiencies and adjust the
    >PC> recipe to compensate.
    >
    >Good for you Pete! I wish I had your abilities and confidence
    >:-)


    I'm pretty good at picking out the good from bad too, but sometimes I
    goof too. I think the occasional mistake only makes me better in the
    kitchen.

    Lou

  6. #6
    The Ranger Guest

    Default Re: (2008-03-01) Who has made something that 'looked good' in print...

    Lou Decruss <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    [snip]
    > I'm pretty good at picking out the good from bad
    > too, but sometimes I goof too. I think the occasional
    > mistake only makes me better in the kitchen.


    Bingo!

    If you don't make occasional mistakes, you aren't good enough
    to recognize them and will repeat them.

    ObTopic: Steak au Poivre
    Gourmet January 1994
    Servings: Serves 2.

    Can be prepared in 45 minutes or less.

    Ingredients
    1 tablespoon black peppercorns
    1 teaspoon white peppercorns
    1 teaspoon dried green peppercorns
    1 teaspoon fennel seeds
    2 boneless shell steaks (3/4 pound each, about 1 1/4 inches
    thick)
    1 tablespoon unsalted butter
    1 tablespoon vegetable oil
    3 tablespoons heavy cream
    2 tablespoons Cognac or brandy

    Preparation
    In a heavy-duty sealable plastic bag or between 2 sheets of wax
    paper crush peppercorns and fennel seeds coarse with bottom of
    a heavy skillet. Pat steaks dry and coat both sides with
    peppercorn mixture. In a 10-inch heavy skillet heat butter and
    oil over moderate heat until hot but not smoking and cook
    steaks for 4 to 5 minutes on each side for medium rare. Season
    steaks with salt and transfer to plates.

    Pour off excess fat from skillet and add cream and Cognac. Boil
    mixture, scraping up browned bits, until sauce thickens and
    coats back of spoon, about 1 minute. Season sauce with salt and
    spoon over steaks.

    The Ranger



  7. #7
    hahabogus Guest

    Default Re: (2008-03-01) Who has made something that 'looked good' in print...

    "The Ranger" <[email protected]> wrote in news:13sitmjn4lcthf7
    @corp.supernews.com:

    > Lou Decruss <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > [snip]
    >> I'm pretty good at picking out the good from bad
    >> too, but sometimes I goof too. I think the occasional
    >> mistake only makes me better in the kitchen.

    >
    > Bingo!
    >
    > If you don't make occasional mistakes, you aren't good enough
    > to recognize them and will repeat them.
    >
    > ObTopic: Steak au Poivre
    > Gourmet January 1994
    > Servings: Serves 2.
    >
    > Can be prepared in 45 minutes or less.
    >
    > Ingredients
    > 1 tablespoon black peppercorns
    > 1 teaspoon white peppercorns
    > 1 teaspoon dried green peppercorns
    > 1 teaspoon fennel seeds
    > 2 boneless shell steaks (3/4 pound each, about 1 1/4 inches
    > thick)
    > 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
    > 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
    > 3 tablespoons heavy cream
    > 2 tablespoons Cognac or brandy
    >
    > Preparation
    > In a heavy-duty sealable plastic bag or between 2 sheets of wax
    > paper crush peppercorns and fennel seeds coarsely with bottom of
    > a heavy skillet. Pat steaks dry and coat both sides with
    > peppercorn mixture. In a 10-inch heavy skillet heat butter and
    > oil over moderate heat until hot but not smoking and cook
    > steaks for 4 to 5 minutes on each side for medium rare. Season
    > steaks with salt and transfer to plates.
    >
    > Pour off excess fat from skillet and add cream and Cognac. Boil
    > mixture, scraping up browned bits, until sauce thickens and
    > coats back of spoon, about 1 minute. Season sauce with salt and
    > spoon over steaks.
    >
    > The Ranger
    >
    >
    >


    Except for the fennel seeds looks taken from J child's first book. Also
    J. Child advises putting the crushed pepper into shallow slits in the
    steak.

    --

    The house of the burning beet-Alan

    It'll be a sunny day in August, when the Moon will shine that night-
    Elbonian Folklore


  8. #8
    The Ranger Guest

    Default Re: (2008-03-01) Who has made something that 'looked good' in print...

    hahabogus <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:Xns9A54624EB916Ehahabogus@69.28.186.12[email protected]..
    > "The Ranger" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >> Lou Decruss <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >> [snip]
    >>> I'm pretty good at picking out the good from bad
    >>> too, but sometimes I goof too. I think the occasional
    >>> mistake only makes me better in the kitchen.

    >>
    >> Bingo!
    >>
    >> If you don't make occasional mistakes, you aren't
    >> good enough to recognize them and will repeat them.
    >>
    >> ObTopic: Steak au Poivre
    >> Gourmet January 1994
    >> Servings: Serves 2.
    >>
    >> Can be prepared in 45 minutes or less.
    >>
    >> Ingredients
    >> 1 tablespoon black peppercorns
    >> 1 teaspoon white peppercorns
    >> 1 teaspoon dried green peppercorns
    >> 1 teaspoon fennel seeds
    >> 2 boneless shell steaks (3/4 pound each, about 1
    >> 1/4 inches thick)
    >> 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
    >> 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
    >> 3 tablespoons heavy cream
    >> 2 tablespoons Cognac or brandy
    >>
    >> Preparation
    >> In a heavy-duty sealable plastic bag or between 2
    >> sheets of wax paper crush peppercorns and fennel
    >> seeds coarsely with bottom of a heavy skillet. Pat
    >> steaks dry and coat both sides with peppercorn
    >> mixture. In a 10-inch heavy skillet heat butter and
    >> oil over moderate heat until hot but not smoking
    >> and cook steaks for 4 to 5 minutes on each side
    >> for medium rare. Season steaks with salt and
    >> transfer to plates.
    >>
    >> Pour off excess fat from skillet and add cream and
    >> Cognac. Boil mixture, scraping up browned bits,
    >> until sauce thickens and coats back of spoon, about
    >> 1 minute. Season sauce with salt and spoon over steaks.
    >>

    > Except for the fennel seeds looks taken from J child's first
    > book. Also J. Child advises putting the crushed pepper
    > into shallow slits in the steak.


    Interesting. I didn't know either of those bits of trivia. I'll
    bet those slits would allow better distribution of the
    peppercorns'' kick, though.

    The Ranger



  9. #9
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: (2008-03-01) Who has made something that 'looked good' in print...


    "ChattyCathy" <[email protected]> wrote

    > http://www.recfoodcooking.com/


    I thought these pork chops in a lemon cream sauce sounded
    tasty, and being that they were cooked in a foil packet, I was
    interested to see how it would turn out.

    The lemon curdled the cream. Of course. For whatever
    reason I figured the recipe would overcome this natural
    result but, no, it looked like barf. (laugh)

    That's just one incident that comes to mind ... it's happened
    other times, too. Some of the best recipes I know contain
    ingredients that sounded awful together, I'm not good at
    figuring out the result from looking at the recipe.

    nancy



  10. #10
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: (2008-03-01) Who has made something that 'looked good' in print...

    sf wrote on Sat, 01 Mar 2008 10:31:11 -0800:

    ??>> On Sat, 01 Mar 2008 15:04:39 GMT, "James Silverton"
    ??>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    ??>>
    ??>>> Pete wrote on Sat, 01 Mar 2008 08:59:39 -0600:
    ??>>>
    PC>>>> ChattyCathy wrote:
    ??>>>>>
    ??>>>>> http://www.recfoodcooking.com/
    ??>>>>>
    ??>>>>> Thanks go to Virginia Tadrzynski (ginny) for this
    ??>>>>> survey.
    ??>>>
    PC>>>> Never. I'm good enough at analyzing a recipe
    PC>>>> and assessing the likely results to avoid any terrible
    PC>>>> results, and indeed anticipate deficiencies and adjust
    PC>>>> the recipe to compensate.
    ??>>>
    ??>>> Good for you Pete! I wish I had your abilities and
    ??>>> confidence :-)
    ??>>
    ??>> I'm pretty good at picking out the good from bad too, but
    ??>> sometimes I goof too. I think the occasional mistake only
    ??>> makes me better in the kitchen.
    ??>>
    s> sometimes you just go with it and discover that you really
    s> *do* like the combination of ingredients.

    I was replying to a post in another group when I remembered
    another "look good". It might have been the presenter but she
    had a recipe for what she called her ur-marinara sauce. It was
    marinara sauce but uncooked and I won't try it again!


    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    E-mail, with obvious alterations:
    not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  11. #11
    maxine in ri Guest

    Default Re: (2008-03-01) Who has made something that 'looked good' inprint...Reception for 100

    On Mar 1, 9:35 am, ChattyCathy <cathy1...@mailinator.com> wrote:
    > http://www.recfoodcooking.com/
    >
    > Thanks go to Virginia Tadrzynski (ginny) for this survey.


    My sister claims that you should be able to look at a recipe and know
    whether it will work well or not. I think she's full of it.

    I'm making the food for a cookies and punch reception tonight, and a
    woman from a mailing list offered to send me several recipes she
    likes. The first one I made said to roll the dough to 1"--I would
    have gotten 10 cookies out of it. After writing to her, she said it
    should be 1/8". which is what I had rolled them out to, and got 88
    cookies, which were sandwiched into 44 lemon cream filled.

    I should have known better than to try another of her recipes, but
    they were Swedish Rose cookies, which are another name for thumbprint
    cookies. Butter, sugar, and flour. I knew that wasn't right, and
    looked up a couple of recipes in books I have. all of them added eggs
    (along with flavoring, baking powder,or nuts.) I added eggs until I
    had a good dough. Got 8 dozen out of that one.

    Also made Barb's Outrageous Brownies (boy version). Got 6 dozen
    cased brownies out of that.

    Also made Jordan Marsh Blueberry muffins in the mini-version. 4
    dozen.

    Also made Molassas cookies. 12 dozen of those.

    The last three came out beautifully, as always. (thanks Barb for the
    brownies, Mom for the muffins, and Mimi Hiller for the book witht he
    Molassas cookies.)

    I've got a bundt pan in the freezer with some of the punch and
    raspberries, and a 3 gallon punch bowl and 5 gallons of punch and
    soda.

    Leftovers will go to my meeting on Sunday, of 16 adult women.

    Leftovers from that will go home with my stepson, to school with my
    DD, and work, mine and DH's, where they will disappear.

    maxine in ri
    "Stop me before I bake again!"

  12. #12
    maxine in ri Guest

    Default Re: (2008-03-01) Who has made something that 'looked good' inprint...

    On Mar 1, 9:35 am, ChattyCathy <cathy1...@mailinator.com> wrote:

    Oh yes, Mimi. She shared what in her house is a favorite recipe for
    chicken with saffron.
    DH ate it, but we both decided once was one time too many.

    maxine in ri

  13. #13
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: (2008-03-01) Who has made something that 'looked good' in print...

    "The Ranger" wrote
    >> I'm pretty good at picking out the good from bad
    >> too, but sometimes I goof too. I think the occasional
    >> mistake only makes me better in the kitchen.

    >
    > Bingo!
    >
    > If you don't make occasional mistakes, you aren't good enough to recognize
    > them and will repeat them.


    Or arent adventurous enough of an eater to have a real 'boff' <grin>. I'd
    be suprized if any who said 'no' really mean it? Not every meal has to be
    an adventure of discovery, but those who try at least one 'new thing' every
    2 weeks (probably most of us here?) are bound to have the occasional 'oops,
    that didnt taste like I thought'. It may not be 'bad', just personally
    unappealing.




  14. #14
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: (2008-03-01) Who has made something that 'looked good' in print...

    cshenk wrote:
    >
    > "The Ranger" wrote
    > >> I'm pretty good at picking out the good from bad
    > >> too, but sometimes I goof too. I think the occasional
    > >> mistake only makes me better in the kitchen.

    > >
    > > Bingo!
    > >
    > > If you don't make occasional mistakes, you aren't good enough to recognize
    > > them and will repeat them.

    >
    > Or arent adventurous enough of an eater to have a real 'boff' <grin>. I'd
    > be suprized if any who said 'no' really mean it? Not every meal has to be
    > an adventure of discovery, but those who try at least one 'new thing' every
    > 2 weeks (probably most of us here?) are bound to have the occasional 'oops,
    > that didnt taste like I thought'. It may not be 'bad', just personally
    > unappealing.
    >


    I'm plenty adventurous, but my mediocre creations are limited to the no
    ambition and in a hurry to slap something together for myself to eat
    times. When trying out something new of cooking for others I'm more
    detail oriented.

  15. #15
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: (2008-03-01) Who has made something that 'looked good' in print...

    sf wrote:
    >
    > On Sat, 01 Mar 2008 18:48:42 GMT, "James Silverton"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >I was replying to a post in another group when I remembered
    > >another "look good". It might have been the presenter but she
    > >had a recipe for what she called her ur-marinara sauce. It was
    > >marinara sauce but uncooked and I won't try it again!

    >
    > There's an entire movement toward raw food!
    > http://www.rawfoods.com/recipes/


    It's nothing more than a bowel movement... 99.95% of the worlds
    population will continue to cook real food.

  16. #16
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: (2008-03-01) Who has made something that 'looked good' inprint...Reception for 100

    maxine in ri wrote:
    >
    > On Mar 1, 9:35 am, ChattyCathy <cathy1...@mailinator.com> wrote:
    > > http://www.recfoodcooking.com/
    > >
    > > Thanks go to Virginia Tadrzynski (ginny) for this survey.

    >
    > My sister claims that you should be able to look at a recipe and know
    > whether it will work well or not. I think she's full of it.


    I'm afraid she's correct. The only caveat is that it's easier for
    regular cooking, baking requires more experience to be able to assess
    the proportions to insure they are correct.


    >
    > I'm making the food for a cookies and punch reception tonight, and a
    > woman from a mailing list offered to send me several recipes she
    > likes. The first one I made said to roll the dough to 1"--I would
    > have gotten 10 cookies out of it. After writing to her, she said it
    > should be 1/8". which is what I had rolled them out to, and got 88
    > cookies, which were sandwiched into 44 lemon cream filled.
    >
    > I should have known better than to try another of her recipes, but
    > they were Swedish Rose cookies, which are another name for thumbprint
    > cookies. Butter, sugar, and flour. I knew that wasn't right, and
    > looked up a couple of recipes in books I have. all of them added eggs
    > (along with flavoring, baking powder,or nuts.) I added eggs until I
    > had a good dough. Got 8 dozen out of that one.
    >
    > Also made Barb's Outrageous Brownies (boy version). Got 6 dozen
    > cased brownies out of that.
    >
    > Also made Jordan Marsh Blueberry muffins in the mini-version. 4
    > dozen.
    >
    > Also made Molassas cookies. 12 dozen of those.
    >
    > The last three came out beautifully, as always. (thanks Barb for the
    > brownies, Mom for the muffins, and Mimi Hiller for the book witht he
    > Molassas cookies.)
    >
    > I've got a bundt pan in the freezer with some of the punch and
    > raspberries, and a 3 gallon punch bowl and 5 gallons of punch and
    > soda.
    >
    > Leftovers will go to my meeting on Sunday, of 16 adult women.
    >
    > Leftovers from that will go home with my stepson, to school with my
    > DD, and work, mine and DH's, where they will disappear.
    >
    > maxine in ri
    > "Stop me before I bake again!"


  17. #17
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: (2008-03-01) Who has made something that 'looked good' in print...

    jmcquown wrote on Sun, 2 Mar 2008 02:54:37 -0500:


    j> "sf" wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    ??>> On Sat, 01 Mar 2008 18:48:42 GMT, "James Silverton"
    ??>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    ??>>
    ??>>> I was replying to a post in another group when I
    ??>>> remembered another "look good". It might have been the
    ??>>> presenter but she had a recipe for what she called her
    ??>>> ur-marinara sauce. It was marinara sauce but uncooked and
    ??>>> I won't try it again!
    ??>>
    ??>> There's an entire movement toward raw food!
    ??>> http://www.rawfoods.com/recipes/
    ??>>
    j> Ah yes, I saw some woman who had written a book on this
    j> subject on some talk show. She demonstrated making uncooked
    j> "marinara sauce"; I have to say it looked singularly
    j> unappealing. The "pasta", IIRC, was julienned zucchini. No
    j> thank you!

    Same item and presenter, I think. It was a rather decorative
    lady called Nigella, tho' when I saw the recipe she actually
    broiled the zucchini. Raw zucchini is not bad, IMHO, as a
    *component* of vegetables for dipping.

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    E-mail, with obvious alterations:
    not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32