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Thread: 100 Days of Real Food

  1. #1
    Goomba Guest

    Default 100 Days of Real Food

    This is a very interesting (to me) blog about a family of four in
    Charlotte, NC who made a pledge to give up all processed foods, eat
    local when possible and avoid purchasing items with more than 5
    ingredients. I've been mulling over the organic v. conventional
    benefits, antibiotic use in animals and other health issues lately so
    found this thought provoking.

    While the writer is obviously affluent and has the resources to buy
    organic and such, she still makes some excellent points through out the
    challenge. The time devoted to planning, adapting routines and cooking
    so much from scratch was impressive.

    Yet she sometimes comes across as overly rigid, such as demanding that
    her parents fall into the plan while *she visited them on vacation*
    which I think is a bit presumptuous.

    As this 100 day challenge has ended, she has taken on a new challenge of
    eating "real food" but only spending $125/week for the four of them. I
    look forward to getting through the archives in that blog section too.

    Perhaps someone here might find this interesting?

    http://www.100daysofrealfood.com/

  2. #2
    Don Wiss Guest

    Default Re: 100 Days of Real Food

    On Mon, 27 Jun 2011 02:14:52 -0400, Goomba <[email protected]> wrote:

    >This is a very interesting (to me) blog about a family of four in
    >Charlotte, NC who made a pledge to give up all processed foods, eat
    >local when possible and avoid purchasing items with more than 5
    >ingredients. I've been mulling over the organic v. conventional
    >benefits, antibiotic use in animals and other health issues lately so
    >found this thought provoking.


    People that follow the paleo diet generally only buy foods with a single
    ingredient. I buy a couple foods with more than one ingredient, like
    Larabars and kale chips, but a purist would argue that some of their
    ingredients are not truly paleo.

    Don. http://paleodiet.com/definition.htm (e-mail link at page bottom).

  3. #3
    The Cook Guest

    Default Re: 100 Days of Real Food

    On Mon, 27 Jun 2011 02:14:52 -0400, Goomba <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >This is a very interesting (to me) blog about a family of four in
    >Charlotte, NC who made a pledge to give up all processed foods, eat
    >local when possible and avoid purchasing items with more than 5
    >ingredients. I've been mulling over the organic v. conventional
    >benefits, antibiotic use in animals and other health issues lately so
    >found this thought provoking.
    >
    >While the writer is obviously affluent and has the resources to buy
    >organic and such, she still makes some excellent points through out the
    >challenge. The time devoted to planning, adapting routines and cooking
    >so much from scratch was impressive.
    >
    >Yet she sometimes comes across as overly rigid, such as demanding that
    >her parents fall into the plan while *she visited them on vacation*
    >which I think is a bit presumptuous.
    >
    >As this 100 day challenge has ended, she has taken on a new challenge of
    >eating "real food" but only spending $125/week for the four of them. I
    >look forward to getting through the archives in that blog section too.
    >
    >Perhaps someone here might find this interesting?
    >
    > http://www.100daysofrealfood.com/



    "The 100-Mile Diet" book is very interesting. The couple ate only
    food that came from within 100 miles of where they lived, Vancouver,
    for a year. A TV series was made from the book where they went to a
    medium sized town and enrolled families to take part for a shorter
    time, like 3 months. Some of the families dropped out within a week,
    others cheated. But some stayed with it through the whole program and
    learned how to have great meals with foods from their local area.

    The show was on the Planet Green channel.
    --
    Susan N.

    "Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
    48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
    Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)

  4. #4
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: 100 Days of Real Food

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Goomba <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Yet she sometimes comes across as overly rigid, such as demanding that
    > her parents fall into the plan while *she visited them on vacation*
    > which I think is a bit presumptuous.


    I agree. We have rather strict dietary "rules" that we follow, but
    if someone else is feeding us, we say thank you and that is it. We have
    friends with whom we are close enough to tell them that it is a meatless
    day or whatever, but unfortunately our families (or rather our mothers)
    would both make a big deal about it and seem to specifically serve meat
    on those days to see if they will get a reaction. We say thank you and
    eat it or if it is a meal that we can pick and choose, eat around it.
    My MIL, though, does try to buy organic or make the choices she thinks
    we would choose when picking food, and we have never asked her to do it,
    so that is a very nice thing she does.

    > As this 100 day challenge has ended, she has taken on a new challenge of
    > eating "real food" but only spending $125/week for the four of them. I
    > look forward to getting through the archives in that blog section too.
    >
    > Perhaps someone here might find this interesting?
    >
    > http://www.100daysofrealfood.com/


    I saw this blog linked somewhere else, I can't remember where now,
    and though I like the idea, I found some of her choices to be less
    "real" food than I would consider. However, reducing any of the
    processed junk is a definite improvement. I guess I'm just a little
    skeptical of "healthy" menus now.

    I would love to make menus that can be made for less than that and
    post them for people. We feed and clean nine people and our animals for
    only a little more than she does to feed four people. On our high end
    budget, we spend about $190 a week for all of us. When we are cutting
    back, we can get it as low as her budget for four, but it's tough.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  5. #5
    Miche Guest

    Default Re: 100 Days of Real Food

    In article <[email protected]>,
    The Cook <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Mon, 27 Jun 2011 02:14:52 -0400, Goomba <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >This is a very interesting (to me) blog about a family of four in
    > >Charlotte, NC who made a pledge to give up all processed foods, eat
    > >local when possible and avoid purchasing items with more than 5
    > >ingredients. I've been mulling over the organic v. conventional
    > >benefits, antibiotic use in animals and other health issues lately so
    > >found this thought provoking.
    > >
    > >While the writer is obviously affluent and has the resources to buy
    > >organic and such, she still makes some excellent points through out the
    > >challenge. The time devoted to planning, adapting routines and cooking
    > >so much from scratch was impressive.
    > >
    > >Yet she sometimes comes across as overly rigid, such as demanding that
    > >her parents fall into the plan while *she visited them on vacation*
    > >which I think is a bit presumptuous.
    > >
    > >As this 100 day challenge has ended, she has taken on a new challenge of
    > >eating "real food" but only spending $125/week for the four of them. I
    > >look forward to getting through the archives in that blog section too.
    > >
    > >Perhaps someone here might find this interesting?
    > >
    > > http://www.100daysofrealfood.com/

    >
    >
    > "The 100-Mile Diet" book is very interesting. The couple ate only
    > food that came from within 100 miles of where they lived, Vancouver,
    > for a year. A TV series was made from the book where they went to a
    > medium sized town and enrolled families to take part for a shorter
    > time, like 3 months. Some of the families dropped out within a week,
    > others cheated. But some stayed with it through the whole program and
    > learned how to have great meals with foods from their local area.
    >
    > The show was on the Planet Green channel.


    Easy to do if you're somewhere like Vancouver. Try it in a more
    isolated part of Canada.

    Miche

    --
    Electricians do it in three phases

  6. #6
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: 100 Days of Real Food

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Miche <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Easy to do if you're somewhere like Vancouver. Try it in a more
    > isolated part of Canada.


    Caribou and lichen?

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  7. #7
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: 100 Days of Real Food


    "Ranée at Arabian Knits" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio

    > Miche <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Easy to do if you're somewhere like Vancouver. Try it in a more
    >> isolated part of Canada.

    >

    Caribou and lichen?

    Walrus liver in season.



  8. #8
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: 100 Days of Real Food

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > This is a very interesting (to me) blog about a family of four in
    > Charlotte, NC who made a pledge to give up all processed foods, eat
    > local when possible and avoid purchasing items with more than 5
    > ingredients. I've been mulling over the organic v. conventional
    > benefits, antibiotic use in animals and other health issues lately so
    > found this thought provoking.
    >
    > While the writer is obviously affluent and has the resources to buy
    > organic and such, she still makes some excellent points through out the
    > challenge. The time devoted to planning, adapting routines and cooking
    > so much from scratch was impressive.
    >
    > Yet she sometimes comes across as overly rigid, such as demanding that
    > her parents fall into the plan while *she visited them on vacation*
    > which I think is a bit presumptuous.
    >
    > As this 100 day challenge has ended, she has taken on a new challenge of
    > eating "real food" but only spending $125/week for the four of them. I
    > look forward to getting through the archives in that blog section too.
    >
    > Perhaps someone here might find this interesting?
    >
    > http://www.100daysofrealfood.com/


    Yes I do, thanks for that; had a quick peek at the original pledge and
    will read more later. Her pledge is pretty much how we eat (and have done
    for 40+ years) though I will occasionally use white flour to make some
    cakes and puddings and always use white sugar when making marmalades and
    jam.

    Janet





  9. #9
    pure kona Guest

    Default Re: 100 Days of Real Food

    On Fri, 1 Jul 2011 18:56:43 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >>
    >>> http://www.100daysofrealfood.com/

    >
    > Yes I do, thanks for that; had a quick peek at the original pledge and
    >will read more later. Her pledge is pretty much how we eat (and have done
    >for 40+ years) though I will occasionally use white flour to make some
    >cakes and puddings and always use white sugar when making marmalades and
    >jam.
    >
    > Janet
    >
    >
    >


    I found it very interesting, thank you posting it. I especially
    enjoyed the simple way to make real popcorn in a plain paper bag. I
    find the stench of those commercial microwave popcorn things,
    obnoxious and it is impossible to rid my microwave of the smell.
    Imagine kernels in a brown bag working so easily. Eureka.

    aloha,
    Cea


  10. #10
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: 100 Days of Real Food

    On 2011-07-01, pure kona <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I found it very interesting, thank you posting it. I especially
    > enjoyed the simple way to make real popcorn in a plain paper bag. I
    > find the stench of those commercial microwave popcorn things,
    > obnoxious and it is impossible to rid my microwave of the smell.
    > Imagine kernels in a brown bag working so easily. Eureka.


    Have you actually tried it? I have. Great way to light a paper bag
    on fire.

    That stinky smell is from the near toxic grease they use to aid the
    popping action. Jes hold yer breath or take outdoors when opening the
    bag. I'd try a plastic microwaving popcorn bowl before nuking a plain
    paper bag. Better yet, jes get a hot air or stovetop popper.

    nb

  11. #11
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: 100 Days of Real Food


    "pure kona" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Fri, 1 Jul 2011 18:56:43 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >>>
    >>>> http://www.100daysofrealfood.com/

    >>
    >> Yes I do, thanks for that; had a quick peek at the original pledge and
    >>will read more later. Her pledge is pretty much how we eat (and have done
    >>for 40+ years) though I will occasionally use white flour to make some
    >>cakes and puddings and always use white sugar when making marmalades and
    >>jam.
    >>
    >> Janet
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    > I found it very interesting, thank you posting it. I especially
    > enjoyed the simple way to make real popcorn in a plain paper bag. I
    > find the stench of those commercial microwave popcorn things,
    > obnoxious and it is impossible to rid my microwave of the smell.
    > Imagine kernels in a brown bag working so easily. Eureka.
    >
    > aloha,
    > Cea


    I have done it that way, even straight from the cob but paper bags can catch
    on fire. Better to get a microwave popper.



  12. #12
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: 100 Days of Real Food

    notbob wrote:
    > On 2011-07-01, pure kona <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I found it very interesting, thank you posting it. I especially
    >> enjoyed the simple way to make real popcorn in a plain paper bag. I
    >> find the stench of those commercial microwave popcorn things,
    >> obnoxious and it is impossible to rid my microwave of the smell.
    >> Imagine kernels in a brown bag working so easily. Eureka.

    >
    > Have you actually tried it? I have. Great way to light a paper bag
    > on fire.
    >
    > That stinky smell is from the near toxic grease they use to aid the
    > popping action. Jes hold yer breath or take outdoors when opening the
    > bag. I'd try a plastic microwaving popcorn bowl before nuking a plain
    > paper bag. Better yet, jes get a hot air or stovetop popper.


    Pan popped is the best!



  13. #13
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: 100 Days of Real Food

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    > On Fri, 1 Jul 2011 18:56:43 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > >>
    > >>> http://www.100daysofrealfood.com/

    > >
    > > Yes I do, thanks for that; had a quick peek at the original pledge and
    > >will read more later. Her pledge is pretty much how we eat (and have done
    > >for 40+ years) though I will occasionally use white flour to make some
    > >cakes and puddings and always use white sugar when making marmalades and
    > >jam.
    > >
    > > Janet
    > >
    > >
    > >

    >
    > I found it very interesting, thank you posting it. I especially
    > enjoyed the simple way to make real popcorn in a plain paper bag. I
    > find the stench of those commercial microwave popcorn things,
    > obnoxious and it is impossible to rid my microwave of the smell.
    > Imagine kernels in a brown bag working so easily. Eureka.


    I make popcorn in a saucepan with the lid on. Works perfectly.

    Janet


  14. #14
    sf Guest

    Default Re: 100 Days of Real Food

    On Sat, 2 Jul 2011 10:32:25 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I make popcorn in a saucepan with the lid on. Works perfectly.


    Me too. Sometimes I get fancy and replace the top with a sieve just
    because I like to see the popcorn pop and mound up.

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  15. #15
    John Smythe Guest

    Default Re: 100 Days of Real Food

    Janet wrote:
    >
    > I make popcorn in a saucepan with the lid on.
    > Works perfectly.
    >
    > Janet


    I did that before I bought a wok. If you have a wok,
    try it. You CAN use less oil to pop the same amount
    of corn in the wok, but you can also use your normal
    amount.




  16. #16
    Ranee at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: 100 Days of Real Food

    In article <[email protected]>,
    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sat, 2 Jul 2011 10:32:25 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I make popcorn in a saucepan with the lid on. Works perfectly.

    >
    > Me too. Sometimes I get fancy and replace the top with a sieve just
    > because I like to see the popcorn pop and mound up.


    That sounds fun! I should do that next time. I much prefer popcorn
    cooked on the stove. It doesn't even seem to need butter when done that
    way.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  17. #17
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: 100 Days of Real Food

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Ranée at Arabian Knits" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >
    > > Miche <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Easy to do if you're somewhere like Vancouver. Try it in a more
    > >> isolated part of Canada.

    > >

    > Caribou and lichen?
    >
    > Walrus liver in season.


    Ugh.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  18. #18
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: 100 Days of Real Food

    In article <iunkh7$n1s$[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...
    >
    > Janet wrote:
    > >
    > > I make popcorn in a saucepan with the lid on.
    > > Works perfectly.
    > >
    > > Janet

    >
    > I did that before I bought a wok. If you have a wok,
    > try it. You CAN use less oil to pop the same amount
    > of corn in the wok, but you can also use your normal
    > amount.


    I'll try it.. my wok has a lid too.

    Janet

  19. #19
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: 100 Days of Real Food

    Ranee wrote:

    >> > I make popcorn in a saucepan with the lid on. Works perfectly.

    >>
    >> Me too. Sometimes I get fancy and replace the top with a sieve just
    >> because I like to see the popcorn pop and mound up.

    >
    > That sounds fun! I should do that next time. I much prefer popcorn
    > cooked on the stove. It doesn't even seem to need butter when done that
    > way.


    I have never cooked popcorn in a microwave. I loathe the smell of it at
    work, and I do NOT want that reekage in my house.

    Even when I do cook popcorn on the stovetop, I hardly ever just leave it at
    that. Last time I made it into a version of Alinea's "liquified popcorn",
    using pepper-infused honey instead of caramel.

    Bob




  20. #20
    sf Guest

    Default Re: 100 Days of Real Food

    On Sat, 2 Jul 2011 20:34:38 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > Ranee wrote:
    >
    > >> > I make popcorn in a saucepan with the lid on. Works perfectly.
    > >>
    > >> Me too. Sometimes I get fancy and replace the top with a sieve just
    > >> because I like to see the popcorn pop and mound up.

    > >
    > > That sounds fun! I should do that next time. I much prefer popcorn
    > > cooked on the stove. It doesn't even seem to need butter when done that
    > > way.

    >
    > I have never cooked popcorn in a microwave. I loathe the smell of it at
    > work, and I do NOT want that reekage in my house.
    >
    > Even when I do cook popcorn on the stovetop, I hardly ever just leave it at
    > that. Last time I made it into a version of Alinea's "liquified popcorn",
    > using pepper-infused honey instead of caramel.
    >

    I like to make caramel corn, but I don't do it very often because
    neither one of us has enough will power to eat "just a little".
    That's why I don't buy See's peanut brittle very often either.

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

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