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Thread: $10 Pizza Stone

  1. #1
    piedmont Guest

    Default $10 Pizza Stone

    All the talk about pizza and pizza stones as well as costs, reminded me
    I bought my pizza stone thru Walmart for $10 but they no longer carry
    them, but I did find them thru Target, see link below,

    $10.00 round Pizza stone at Target.


    http://www.target.com/s/175-0313285-...NM=pizza_stone


    --
    piedmont, The Practical BBQ'r

    http://sites.google.com/site/thepracticalbbqr/

    (mawil55)

  2. #2
    piedmont Guest

    Default Re: $10 Pizza Stone

    On 2/15/2010 9:41 PM, piedmont wrote:
    > All the talk about pizza and pizza stones as well as costs, reminded me
    > I bought my pizza stone thru Walmart for $10 but they no longer carry
    > them, but I did find them thru Target, see link below,
    >
    > $10.00 round Pizza stone at Target.
    >
    >
    > http://www.target.com/s/175-0313285-...NM=pizza_stone
    >
    >
    >

    direct link,,

    http://www.target.com/Chefmate-Pizza...i_detailbutton

    --
    piedmont, The Practical BBQ'r

    http://sites.google.com/site/thepracticalbbqr/

    (mawil55)

  3. #3
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: $10 Pizza Stone


    "piedmont" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:hld0l7$3eh$[email protected]..
    > All the talk about pizza and pizza stones as well as costs, reminded me I
    > bought my pizza stone thru Walmart for $10 but they no longer carry them,
    > but I did find them thru Target, see link below,
    >
    > $10.00 round Pizza stone at Target.
    >
    >
    > http://www.target.com/s/175-0313285-...NM=pizza_stone
    >
    >
    > --
    > piedmont, The Practical BBQ'r
    >
    > http://sites.google.com/site/thepracticalbbqr/
    >
    > (mawil55)
    >
    >

    This stone is too thin to do what a stone should. The pizza stone has to
    hold the heat after the pizza hits it. This stone doesn't do that. I own
    one.

    Kent






  4. #4
    pltrgyst Guest

    Default Re: $10 Pizza Stone

    On Mon, 15 Feb 2010 21:42:47 -0500, piedmont <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >http://www.target.com/Chefmate-Pizza...i_detailbutton


    This model is quite small and thin, though. You prefer a stone 1/2
    inch thick, minimum. Otherwise, you might as well use quarry tile,
    which is cheaper still.

    -- Larry

  5. #5
    sf Guest

    Default Re: $10 Pizza Stone

    On Tue, 16 Feb 2010 00:07:24 -0500, pltrgyst <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > On Mon, 15 Feb 2010 21:42:47 -0500, piedmont <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >http://www.target.com/Chefmate-Pizza...i_detailbutton

    >
    > This model is quite small and thin, though. You prefer a stone 1/2
    > inch thick, minimum. Otherwise, you might as well use quarry tile,
    > which is cheaper still.
    >

    Quarry tile does the job very well - AFAIC.


    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  6. #6
    sf Guest

    Default Re: $10 Pizza Stone

    On Mon, 15 Feb 2010 20:57:05 -0800, "Kent" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > "piedmont" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:hld0l7$3eh$[email protected]..
    > > All the talk about pizza and pizza stones as well as costs, reminded me I
    > > bought my pizza stone thru Walmart for $10 but they no longer carry them,
    > > but I did find them thru Target, see link below,
    > >
    > > $10.00 round Pizza stone at Target.
    > >
    > >
    > > http://www.target.com/s/175-0313285-...NM=pizza_stone
    > >
    > > http://sites.google.com/site/thepracticalbbqr/
    > >

    `````````
    > >
    > >

    > This stone is too thin to do what a stone should. The pizza stone has to
    > hold the heat after the pizza hits it. This stone doesn't do that. I own
    > one.
    >

    Good grief! What is it made of that it can't "hold heat"? That's
    just BS. IMO, if there were any real problems - it wasn't preheated
    long enough.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  7. #7
    PeterL1. Guest

    Default Re: $10 Pizza Stone

    sf <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Mon, 15 Feb 2010 20:57:05 -0800, "Kent" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> "piedmont" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:hld0l7$3eh$[email protected]..
    >> > All the talk about pizza and pizza stones as well as costs, reminded
    >> > me I bought my pizza stone thru Walmart for $10 but they no longer
    >> > carry them, but I did find them thru Target, see link below,
    >> >
    >> > $10.00 round Pizza stone at Target.
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > http://www.target.com/s/175-0313285-..._encoding=UTF8

    &CPNG=Kitche
    >> > n&LID=21169132&search-alias=tgt-index&keywords=pizza-

    stone&searchSize=
    >> > 30&ref=tgt_adv_XSGT0743&searchView=grid5&searchNod eID=1038576

    &AFID=Goo
    >> > gle&searchPage=1&searchRank=target104545&LNM=pizza _stone
    >> >
    >> > http://sites.google.com/site/thepracticalbbqr/
    >> >

    > `````````
    >> >
    >> >

    >> This stone is too thin to do what a stone should. The pizza stone has
    >> to hold the heat after the pizza hits it. This stone doesn't do that. I
    >> own one.
    >>

    > Good grief! What is it made of that it can't "hold heat"? That's
    > just BS. IMO, if there were any real problems - it wasn't preheated
    > long enough.
    >



    Eggfrikkenzaktly!!!

    Mine is *exactly* the same, and it holds heat like a sumbitch!!


    http://i48.tinypic.com/2uzv7ux.jpg


    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia


    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocrites.

    -- Albert Einstein --

  8. #8
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: $10 Pizza Stone


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Mon, 15 Feb 2010 20:57:05 -0800, "Kent" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> "piedmont" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:hld0l7$3eh$[email protected]..
    >> > All the talk about pizza and pizza stones as well as costs, reminded me
    >> > I
    >> > bought my pizza stone thru Walmart for $10 but they no longer carry
    >> > them,
    >> > but I did find them thru Target, see link below,
    >> >
    >> > $10.00 round Pizza stone at Target.
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > http://www.target.com/s/175-0313285-...NM=pizza_stone
    >> >
    >> > http://sites.google.com/site/thepracticalbbqr/
    >> >

    > `````````
    >> >
    >> >

    >> This stone is too thin to do what a stone should. The pizza stone has to
    >> hold the heat after the pizza hits it. This stone doesn't do that. I own
    >> one.
    >>

    > Good grief! What is it made of that it can't "hold heat"? That's
    > just BS. IMO, if there were any real problems - it wasn't preheated
    > long enough.
    >
    > --
    > I love cooking with wine.
    > Sometimes I even put it in the food.
    >
    >

    The stone has to have enough mass to retain enough heat so the surface
    temperature does not drop when you put the pizza on it. A preheated cookie
    sheet doesn't work because the temp. of the sheet drops instantly when you
    place the pizza on it. A thin stone does the same.

    Kent






  9. #9
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: $10 Pizza Stone


    "PeterL1." <PeterL1.@home.upstairs.in.brissie.aus> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] ...
    > sf <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> On Mon, 15 Feb 2010 20:57:05 -0800, "Kent" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> "piedmont" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:hld0l7$3eh$[email protected]..
    >>> > All the talk about pizza and pizza stones as well as costs, reminded
    >>> > me I bought my pizza stone thru Walmart for $10 but they no longer
    >>> > carry them, but I did find them thru Target, see link below,
    >>> >
    >>> > $10.00 round Pizza stone at Target.
    >>> >
    >>> >
    >>> > http://www.target.com/s/175-0313285-..._encoding=UTF8

    > &CPNG=Kitche
    >>> > n&LID=21169132&search-alias=tgt-index&keywords=pizza-

    > stone&searchSize=
    >>> > 30&ref=tgt_adv_XSGT0743&searchView=grid5&searchNod eID=1038576

    > &AFID=Goo
    >>> > gle&searchPage=1&searchRank=target104545&LNM=pizza _stone
    >>> >
    >>> > http://sites.google.com/site/thepracticalbbqr/
    >>> >

    >> `````````
    >>> >
    >>> >
    >>> This stone is too thin to do what a stone should. The pizza stone has
    >>> to hold the heat after the pizza hits it. This stone doesn't do that. I
    >>> own one.
    >>>

    >> Good grief! What is it made of that it can't "hold heat"? That's
    >> just BS. IMO, if there were any real problems - it wasn't preheated
    >> long enough.
    >>

    >
    >
    > Eggfrikkenzaktly!!!
    >
    > Mine is *exactly* the same, and it holds heat like a sumbitch!!
    >
    >
    > http://i48.tinypic.com/2uzv7ux.jpg
    >
    >
    > --
    > Peter Lucas
    > Brisbane
    > Australia
    >
    >

    What is that on top of the cheese? What's all that black soot? Your pizza
    crust didn't rise at all on the edge?





  10. #10
    Cindy Hamilton Guest

    Default Re: $10 Pizza Stone

    On Feb 16, 5:23*am, "Kent" <aka.k...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > "PeterL1." <Peter...@home.upstairs.in.brissie.aus> wrote in message


    > >http://i48.tinypic.com/2uzv7ux.jpg

    >
    > > --
    > > Peter Lucas
    > > Brisbane
    > > Australia

    >
    > What is that on top of the cheese?


    Looks like black olives. Or maybe prunes, but that would be nasty.

    >What's all that black soot? *


    Burnt semolina. Looks perfectly normal.

    >Your pizza
    > crust didn't rise at all on the edge?


    I find that if you dress the crust all the way to the edge, the edge
    doesn't rise much. Perhaps Peter used a rolling pin, which tends
    to make the crust more uniform.

    Cindy Hamilton

  11. #11
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: $10 Pizza Stone

    On Feb 15, 9:41*pm, piedmont <see....@gmail.com> wrote:
    > All the talk about pizza and pizza stones as well as costs, reminded me
    > I bought my pizza stone thru Walmart for $10 but they no longer carry
    > them, but I did find them thru Target, see link below,
    >
    > $10.00 round Pizza stone at Target.
    >



    I bought mine at Williams Sonoma many years ago - you pay more but
    it's a thick stone, good 15 inch diameter, and has a sturdy detachable
    handle.

    I learned after a few bad experiences not to go too cheap on cooking
    gear which you plan to use for a long time.

  12. #12
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: $10 Pizza Stone

    On Tue, 16 Feb 2010 08:40:04 GMT, "PeterL1."
    <PeterL1.@home.upstairs.in.brissie.aus> wrote:

    >sf <[email protected]> wrote in
    >news:[email protected] :
    >
    >> On Mon, 15 Feb 2010 20:57:05 -0800, "Kent" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> "piedmont" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:hld0l7$3eh$[email protected]..
    >>> > All the talk about pizza and pizza stones as well as costs, reminded
    >>> > me I bought my pizza stone thru Walmart for $10 but they no longer
    >>> > carry them, but I did find them thru Target, see link below,
    >>> >
    >>> > $10.00 round Pizza stone at Target.
    >>> >
    >>> >
    >>> > http://www.target.com/s/175-0313285-..._encoding=UTF8

    >&CPNG=Kitche
    >>> > n&LID=21169132&search-alias=tgt-index&keywords=pizza-

    >stone&searchSize=
    >>> > 30&ref=tgt_adv_XSGT0743&searchView=grid5&searchNod eID=1038576

    >&AFID=Goo
    >>> > gle&searchPage=1&searchRank=target104545&LNM=pizza _stone
    >>> >
    >>> > http://sites.google.com/site/thepracticalbbqr/
    >>> >

    >> `````````
    >>> >
    >>> >
    >>> This stone is too thin to do what a stone should. The pizza stone has
    >>> to hold the heat after the pizza hits it. This stone doesn't do that. I
    >>> own one.
    >>>

    >> Good grief! What is it made of that it can't "hold heat"? That's
    >> just BS. IMO, if there were any real problems - it wasn't preheated
    >> long enough.
    >>

    >
    >
    >Eggfrikkenzaktly!!!
    >
    >Mine is *exactly* the same, and it holds heat like a sumbitch!!
    >
    >
    >http://i48.tinypic.com/2uzv7ux.jpg


    Doesn't matter if the pizza stone is a mile thick.

    Why does it have to hold heat, do you turn off your oven as soon as
    you put your pizza in to bake... actually by using a pizza stone you
    may as well. To hear yoose kitchen imbeciles rave on about pizza
    stones would almost be humorous if they didn't defy the laws of
    physics... no pizza stone gets hotter than the oven temperature, but
    as soon as the raw pizza is set on the stone condensation occurs, as
    with all bread baking a lot of condensation, a virtual monsoon, cools
    the contact area to below the temperature of boiling water, and there
    is no way a pizza stone in a residential oven can reheat/recover
    quickly enough since the pizza blocks the oven's natural convection,
    won't even recoupe temperature in a convection oven because hot air
    can't get between the pizza and the stone... the pizza crust bottom
    actually stews in its own juices. There is no way to turn a
    residential oven into a brick oven... with real brick ovens the flame
    is intense and actually licks the underside of the bricks so recovery
    is almost instantaneous.... commercial electric pizza ovens have their
    powerful elements embedded inside the special compostion fire brick
    oven floor, again recovery is pretty fast (using any old stone/floor
    tile just adds insult to injury). Home ovens are simply much too
    wussy to become a brick oven or a commercial pizza oven no matter how
    much stone you pile in. But even pizzarias are now into energy
    conservation and so all are going into using *pizza screens*, which
    take advantage of any oven's natural convection and work especially
    well in modern convection ovens and as many high volume pizza chains
    use, conveyer ovens.... the pizza screen permits the pizza to bake
    quicker, to bake the crust before the toppings burn. Pizza screens
    are available in many sizes and are relatively inexpensive, like $6
    each... they last a long time but can get kind of cruddy, not that
    germs live in a hot oven but for most home cooks they just look
    grungy, and the typical home cook is squeamish even about touching
    food, so for home use perforated pizza pans are a much better choice,
    they work well on outdoor grills too... and serving your pizza on a
    perforated pan instead of a solid pan eliminates the condensation that
    occurs, so your pizza crust stays crisp from first bite to last. Pizza
    stones are for the dummies who failed junior high scool general
    science... the typical guinea pizza tosser never went to any school,
    but now they are discovering that pizza screens are a big improvement
    even used in real brick ovens, creates an air space beneath the pie so
    moisture can escape immediately, the crust actually bakes instead of
    stewing. Pizza screens/perforated pans permit baking directly on ones
    wire oven rack... perfect convection, zero condensation. For the home
    cook the perforated pan/screen eliminates the pizza peel too, no muss,
    no fuss... perfect for those frozen pies too... in fact all bread
    bakes better on perforated pans, that's why baking supply emporiums
    sell so many. Just basic science... as soon as someone says they own
    a pizza stone I know I've just met another kitchen imbecile who hasn't
    a clue how cook anything other than by babbon ass face see, baboon ass
    face do. LOL



  13. #13
    sf Guest

    Default Re: $10 Pizza Stone

    On Tue, 16 Feb 2010 02:18:23 -0800, "Kent" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The stone has to have enough mass to retain enough heat so the surface
    > temperature does not drop when you put the pizza on it. A preheated cookie
    > sheet doesn't work because the temp. of the sheet drops instantly when you
    > place the pizza on it. A thin stone does the same.
    >

    Cookie sheet, ok... thin stone/tile, you're completely wrong.


    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  14. #14
    Pinstripe Sniper Guest

    Default Re: $10 Pizza Stone

    "Kent" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>> This stone is too thin to do what a stone should. The pizza stone has to
    >>> hold the heat after the pizza hits it. This stone doesn't do that. I own
    >>> one.
    >>>

    >> Good grief! What is it made of that it can't "hold heat"? That's
    >> just BS. IMO, if there were any real problems - it wasn't preheated
    >> long enough.
    >>
    >> --
    >> I love cooking with wine.
    >> Sometimes I even put it in the food.
    >>
    >>

    >The stone has to have enough mass to retain enough heat so the surface
    >temperature does not drop when you put the pizza on it. A preheated cookie
    >sheet doesn't work because the temp. of the sheet drops instantly when you
    >place the pizza on it. A thin stone does the same.
    >
    >Kent


    Good reply Kent. I would insert the word "significantly" after
    "surface temperature does not drop"

    As for the Brooklyn's screeching about condensation, doesn't steam
    condense only when the temp drops below boiling? (assuming no drastic
    changes in ambient pressure :-) This to me would indicate
    inadequate thermal mass.

    Also, it seems that many successful home tile oven pizza makers crank
    the oven temp up as high as possible. Yes, ideally the cooking
    equipment will put out the desired amount of heat and quickly
    adjustable but when one is BTU limited, then thermal mass is one way
    to compensate. For instance, for stir frying, a wok made of thicker
    metal, cast iron even! (Lodge makes/made a cast iron wok)

    Another way to compensate is by cooking smaller amounts of food. So
    perhaps a person making thinner crust pizzas will be happier with the
    thinner stone. (or their preheat is 1000 degrees F )

    PsS

    --------------------------------------------------------------------
    A fictional account of how to drastically reform the financial world...
    More at http://PinstripeSniper.blogspot.com and if that gets banned, check
    www.PinstripeSniper.com

  15. #15
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: $10 Pizza Stone


    "Pinstripe Sniper" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > "Kent" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>>> This stone is too thin to do what a stone should. The pizza stone has
    >>>> to
    >>>> hold the heat after the pizza hits it. This stone doesn't do that. I
    >>>> own
    >>>> one.
    >>>>
    >>> Good grief! What is it made of that it can't "hold heat"? That's
    >>> just BS. IMO, if there were any real problems - it wasn't preheated
    >>> long enough.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> I love cooking with wine.
    >>> Sometimes I even put it in the food.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>The stone has to have enough mass to retain enough heat so the surface
    >>temperature does not drop when you put the pizza on it. A preheated cookie
    >>sheet doesn't work because the temp. of the sheet drops instantly when you
    >>place the pizza on it. A thin stone does the same.
    >>
    >>Kent

    >
    > Good reply Kent. I would insert the word "significantly" after
    > "surface temperature does not drop"
    >
    > As for the Brooklyn's screeching about condensation, doesn't steam
    > condense only when the temp drops below boiling? (assuming no drastic
    > changes in ambient pressure :-) This to me would indicate
    > inadequate thermal mass.
    >
    > Also, it seems that many successful home tile oven pizza makers crank
    > the oven temp up as high as possible. Yes, ideally the cooking
    > equipment will put out the desired amount of heat and quickly
    > adjustable but when one is BTU limited, then thermal mass is one way
    > to compensate. For instance, for stir frying, a wok made of thicker
    > metal, cast iron even! (Lodge makes/made a cast iron wok)
    >
    > Another way to compensate is by cooking smaller amounts of food. So
    > perhaps a person making thinner crust pizzas will be happier with the
    > thinner stone. (or their preheat is 1000 degrees F )
    >
    > PsS
    >
    >

    "Screeching", what a great description! I've always thought that when the
    undersurface of the pizza dough hits the porous stone[preheated to 500+F
    that some steam from the dough is absorbed by the porous stone. This creates
    a crisper crust than you would get on another surface, including, I think,
    parchament paper. That's all in addition to the benefit of having enough
    thermal mass to maintain a more stable temp. as the pizza is baking.

    Kent






  16. #16
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: $10 Pizza Stone


    "Cindy Hamilton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On Feb 16, 5:23 am, "Kent" <aka.k...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > "PeterL1." <Peter...@home.upstairs.in.brissie.aus> wrote in message


    > >http://i48.tinypic.com/2uzv7ux.jpg

    >
    > > --
    > > Peter Lucas
    > > Brisbane
    > > Australia

    >
    > What is that on top of the cheese?


    Looks like black olives. Or maybe prunes, but that would be nasty.

    >What's all that black soot?


    Burnt semolina. Looks perfectly normal.

    >Your pizza
    > crust didn't rise at all on the edge?


    I find that if you dress the crust all the way to the edge, the edge
    doesn't rise much. Perhaps Peter used a rolling pin, which tends
    to make the crust more uniform.

    Cindy Hamilton
    >
    >
    >
    >

    I don't like semolina. It adds something to the pizza that just doesn't
    belong there, particularly in this case, with the slight burn. I dust
    the top of the wooden peel with flour so the pizza will slide onto the
    stone. I've never had any residue. I think it's important to have a good
    wooden peel. I buy mine at a local restaurant supply house at very good
    prices.

    Peter's pizza appears slightly overtopped. I don't like a rolling pin for
    the pizza dough. I do use it gently to get the round to 1+ inch thick. Then,
    it's by hand with some throwing into the air, depending on how wet the dough
    is. This more gentle stretching of the dough gives it a better chewing
    texture with some holes in the crust, and the peripheral crust is slightly
    more prominent than the center.

    Kent





  17. #17
    PeterL1. Guest

    Default Re: $10 Pizza Stone

    Cindy Hamilton <[email protected]> wrote in news:6c405e41-163b-
    [email protected]:

    > On Feb 16, 5:23*am, "Kent" <aka.k...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >> "PeterL1." <Peter...@home.upstairs.in.brissie.aus> wrote in message

    >
    >> >http://i48.tinypic.com/2uzv7ux.jpg

    >>
    >> > --
    >> > Peter Lucas
    >> > Brisbane
    >> > Australia

    >>
    >> What is that on top of the cheese?

    >
    > Looks like black olives. Or maybe prunes, but that would be nasty.



    Prunes!! That *would* be nasty!!!

    You were right, pitted Kalamata olives.


    >
    >>What's all that black soot? *

    >
    > Burnt semolina. Looks perfectly normal.



    Right again!!

    I'm having a bit of trouble finding medium semolina, so have to use the
    fine stuff, but it works just as well.


    >
    >>Your pizza
    >> crust didn't rise at all on the edge?

    >
    > I find that if you dress the crust all the way to the edge, the edge
    > doesn't rise much. Perhaps Peter used a rolling pin, which tends
    > to make the crust more uniform.
    >



    Right again!!! You're pretty good Cindy ;-)

    I gave up trying to be the 'perfect pizza man' and tossing the dough all
    over the place a long time ago...... it's just as easy to roll it out, and
    quicker :-)

    And over here, only the commercial places (Pizza Hut, Dominos et al) don't
    'dress' right to the edge...... because in the long run, they save money
    by doing it.
    Less toppings = more profit.

    My favourite Pizza joint, Pancho's in Bulimba, dress to the edge, and I
    have copied their style. Can't quite get their taste right....... which is
    why it's still our favourite Pizza joint and we keep going back :-)



    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia


    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocrites.

    -- Albert Einstein --

  18. #18
    PeterL1. Guest

    Default Re: $10 Pizza Stone

    "Kent" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:hlf7o3$qdc$[email protected]:

    >
    > "Cindy Hamilton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:6c405e41-163b-49bb-bb8e-a5608509e2a6

    @z11g2000yqz.googlegroups.com...
    > On Feb 16, 5:23 am, "Kent" <aka.k...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >> "PeterL1." <Peter...@home.upstairs.in.brissie.aus> wrote in message

    >
    >> >http://i48.tinypic.com/2uzv7ux.jpg

    >>
    >> > --
    >> > Peter Lucas
    >> > Brisbane
    >> > Australia

    >>
    >> What is that on top of the cheese?

    >
    > Looks like black olives. Or maybe prunes, but that would be nasty.
    >
    >>What's all that black soot?

    >
    > Burnt semolina. Looks perfectly normal.
    >
    >>Your pizza
    >> crust didn't rise at all on the edge?

    >
    > I find that if you dress the crust all the way to the edge, the edge
    > doesn't rise much. Perhaps Peter used a rolling pin, which tends
    > to make the crust more uniform.
    >
    > Cindy Hamilton
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > I don't like semolina. It adds something to the pizza that just doesn't
    > belong there, particularly in this case, with the slight burn.



    It adds absolutely *nothing* to the pizza, and falls off very easily when
    the pizza is picked up/moved off the stone.


    > I dust
    > the top of the wooden peel with flour so the pizza will slide onto the
    > stone. I've never had any residue. I think it's important to have a good
    > wooden peel. I buy mine at a local restaurant supply house at very good
    > prices.
    >
    > Peter's pizza appears slightly overtopped.



    Your opinion, everyone is different. Just don't expect everyone to conform
    to what *you* think is right.
    You might go for pizza sauce, a dob of mozzarella and a few basil leaves,
    but if that's all I wanted on a pizza, I'd make a toasted cheese sandwich
    with tomato sauce on it.

    Pizzas in Australia are different to what you get there. Over here, we get
    taste, and value for money.


    > I don't like a rolling pin
    > for the pizza dough.



    Once again, everyone is different.


    > I do use it gently to get the round to 1+ inch
    > thick. Then, it's by hand with some throwing into the air, depending on
    > how wet the dough is. This more gentle stretching of the dough gives it
    > a better chewing texture with some holes in the crust,



    My pizza dough maintains a good texture, and is not "chewy" at all. And it
    *never* has holes in it!!



    > and the
    > peripheral crust is slightly more prominent than the center.
    >



    Meaning you don't dress to the edge. Your preference.

    Do you spread right to the edge on a sandwich? Or do you put everything in
    the middle and eat like that?

    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia


    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocrites.

    -- Albert Einstein --

  19. #19
    PeterL1. Guest

    Default Re: $10 Pizza Stone

    "Kent" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:hldrdg$m8$[email protected]:

    >
    > "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..


    >>> This stone is too thin to do what a stone should. The pizza stone has
    >>> to hold the heat after the pizza hits it. This stone doesn't do that.
    >>> I own one.
    >>>

    >> Good grief! What is it made of that it can't "hold heat"? That's
    >> just BS. IMO, if there were any real problems - it wasn't preheated
    >> long enough.
    >>
    >> --
    >> I love cooking with wine.
    >> Sometimes I even put it in the food.
    >>
    >>

    > The stone has to have enough mass to retain enough heat so the surface
    > temperature does not drop when you put the pizza on it. A preheated
    > cookie sheet doesn't work because the temp. of the sheet drops instantly
    > when you place the pizza on it. A thin stone does the same.
    >



    What a crock of ****!!

    My stone is almost *exactly* the same, and it holds heat wonderfully.

    You have obviously used a thinner 'stone' incorrectly in the past, and
    have based your opinion on that.


    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia


    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocrites.

    -- Albert Einstein --

  20. #20
    sf Guest

    Default Re: $10 Pizza Stone

    On Wed, 17 Feb 2010 01:36:22 GMT, "PeterL1."
    <PeterL1.@home.upstairs.in.brissie.aus> wrote:

    > You have obviously used a thinner 'stone' incorrectly in the past, and
    > have based your opinion on that.


    Could be, but most of the time it's just a theory. Too much theory,
    not enough practice.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

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