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Thread: "00" Flour - pizza

  1. #1
    Tracy Guest

    Default "00" Flour - pizza

    I happened upon this recently at my produce market. I had heard it's
    good for pizza. I've been fiddling around with my pizza dough recipe
    and thought I might try it out.

    I have been using a combination of bread flour and durum which was
    working really well. The "00" dough is very relaxed after it rises.
    It does not spring back at all and produces a crust that is actually
    crispy. It might have been just a tad too crispy though. I think if
    I didn't roll it out as thin - it would have the better combination
    of crispy and chewy.

    I paid $1.89 for a 2.2 pound bag, which I thought was a decent price.

    Does anyone have experience using this type of flour for pizza? I
    am wondering if I can cut it with bread flour (or a combination of
    wheat/and or durum) and still get the nice relaxed dough result.

    I generally put about 2 1/2 cups of flour in my food processor along
    with 2 tsp instant yeast and a teaspoon of salt and enough warm
    water to make a nice soft dough.

    Tracy

  2. #2
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: "00" Flour - pizza

    Tracy wrote:

    > I have been using a combination of bread flour and durum which was
    > working really well. The "00" dough is very relaxed after it rises.
    > It does not spring back at all and produces a crust that is actually
    > crispy. It might have been just a tad too crispy though. I think if
    > I didn't roll it out as thin - it would have the better combination
    > of crispy and chewy.


    I've been told there's no point in using 00 grind unless you're going
    to toss-and-spin the crust to stretch it. The idea is that the 00
    flour forms long gluten chains better. If you roll the dough on a
    board, you might as well use AP grind.

    Of course, if you didn't pay a premium, it's academic.



  3. #3
    sf Guest

    Default Re: "00" Flour - pizza

    On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 10:21:54 -0400, Tracy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I happened upon this recently at my produce market. I had heard it's
    > good for pizza. I've been fiddling around with my pizza dough recipe
    > and thought I might try it out.
    >
    > I have been using a combination of bread flour and durum which was
    > working really well. The "00" dough is very relaxed after it rises.
    > It does not spring back at all and produces a crust that is actually
    > crispy. It might have been just a tad too crispy though. I think if
    > I didn't roll it out as thin - it would have the better combination
    > of crispy and chewy.
    >
    > I paid $1.89 for a 2.2 pound bag, which I thought was a decent price.
    >
    > Does anyone have experience using this type of flour for pizza? I
    > am wondering if I can cut it with bread flour (or a combination of
    > wheat/and or durum) and still get the nice relaxed dough result.
    >
    > I generally put about 2 1/2 cups of flour in my food processor along
    > with 2 tsp instant yeast and a teaspoon of salt and enough warm
    > water to make a nice soft dough.
    >

    I don't know the answer to any of your questions, but thanks for
    posting. I can buy 00 in bulk, but have never used it. I was going
    to use it with all purpose but always seem to go with what I know. If
    it makes a crispy crust when used 100%, I think I'll try it the first
    time without mixing and see how it goes. That said, have you seen
    this site? It may have some answers for you.
    http://www.seriouseats.com/talk/2011...-00-flour.html


    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  4. #4
    Tracy Guest

    Default Re: "00" Flour - pizza



    On 10/11/2012 6:38 PM, sf wrote:
    > On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 10:21:54 -0400, Tracy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I happened upon this recently at my produce market. I had heard it's
    >> good for pizza. I've been fiddling around with my pizza dough recipe
    >> and thought I might try it out.
    >>
    >> I have been using a combination of bread flour and durum which was
    >> working really well. The "00" dough is very relaxed after it rises.
    >> It does not spring back at all and produces a crust that is actually
    >> crispy. It might have been just a tad too crispy though. I think if
    >> I didn't roll it out as thin - it would have the better combination
    >> of crispy and chewy.
    >>
    >> I paid $1.89 for a 2.2 pound bag, which I thought was a decent price.
    >>
    >> Does anyone have experience using this type of flour for pizza? I
    >> am wondering if I can cut it with bread flour (or a combination of
    >> wheat/and or durum) and still get the nice relaxed dough result.
    >>
    >> I generally put about 2 1/2 cups of flour in my food processor along
    >> with 2 tsp instant yeast and a teaspoon of salt and enough warm
    >> water to make a nice soft dough.
    >>

    > I don't know the answer to any of your questions, but thanks for
    > posting. I can buy 00 in bulk, but have never used it. I was going
    > to use it with all purpose but always seem to go with what I know. If
    > it makes a crispy crust when used 100%, I think I'll try it the first
    > time without mixing and see how it goes. That said, have you seen
    > this site? It may have some answers for you.
    > http://www.seriouseats.com/talk/2011...-00-flour.html
    >
    >

    Thanks that was interesting to read. And yes, the crust is crispy -
    and I don't use a pizza stone.

    Tracy

  5. #5
    sf Guest

    Default Re: "00" Flour - pizza

    On Fri, 12 Oct 2012 09:36:56 -0400, Tracy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > It may have some answers for you.
    > > http://www.seriouseats.com/talk/2011...-00-flour.html
    > >
    > >

    > Thanks that was interesting to read.


    You're welcome!

    > And yes, the crust is crispy - and I don't use a pizza stone.


    Wow! I have a stone, so now I'm really curious.

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  6. #6
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: "00" Flour - pizza

    On Oct 11, 7:21*am, Tracy <karac...@bc.edu> wrote:
    > I happened upon this recently at my produce market. I had heard it's
    > good for pizza. I've been fiddling around with my pizza dough recipe
    > and thought I might try it out.
    >
    > I have been using a combination of bread flour and durum which was
    > working really well. The "00" dough is very relaxed after it rises.
    > It does not spring back at all and produces a crust that is actually
    > crispy. It might have been just a tad too crispy though. I think if
    > I didn't roll it out as thin - it would have the better combination
    > of crispy and chewy.
    >
    > I paid $1.89 for a 2.2 pound bag, which I thought was a decent price.
    >
    > Does anyone have experience using *this type of flour for pizza? I
    > am wondering if I can cut it with bread flour (or a combination of
    > wheat/and or durum) and still get the nice relaxed dough result.
    >
    > I generally put about 2 1/2 cups of flour in my food processor along
    > with 2 tsp instant yeast and a teaspoon of salt and enough warm
    > water to make a nice soft dough.
    >
    > Tracy


    I see that Cash & Carry carries Mondako pizza flour- 17.98 for 50#.
    Mondako= Montana and Dakota wheat...Not sure if there is anything
    added to it, but for that price, you can make pizzas for the whole
    neighborhood!

  7. #7
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: "00" Flour - pizza

    On Sat, 13 Oct 2012 11:29:23 -0700 (PDT), merryb <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    snip
    >
    >I see that Cash & Carry carries Mondako pizza flour- 17.98 for 50#.
    >Mondako= Montana and Dakota wheat...Not sure if there is anything
    >added to it, but for that price, you can make pizzas for the whole
    >neighborhood!


    I read that bag also and couldn't find any additives listed. It's
    interesting, but I couldn't imagine using up a quarter of that flour .
    Janet US

  8. #8
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: "00" Flour - pizza

    On Oct 13, 12:12*pm, Janet Bostwick <nos...@cableone.net> wrote:
    > On Sat, 13 Oct 2012 11:29:23 -0700 (PDT), merryb <msg...@juno.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    > snip
    >
    >
    >
    > >I see that Cash & Carry carries Mondako pizza flour- 17.98 for 50#.
    > >Mondako= Montana and Dakota wheat...Not sure if there is anything
    > >added to it, but for that price, you can make pizzas for the whole
    > >neighborhood!

    >
    > I read that bag also and couldn't find any additives listed. *It's
    > interesting, but I couldn't imagine using up a quarter of that flour .
    > Janet US


    LOL- agree on that! That's when you need to find a friend or 2 to
    split it with. I had to make a bunch of cupcakes for graduations, so I
    bought 50 # of cake flour! Don't know what I was thinking, but it was
    cheap!

  9. #9
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: "00" Flour - pizza

    On 10/11/2012 10:21 AM, Tracy wrote:

    > I happened upon this recently at my produce market. I had heard it's
    > good for pizza. I've been fiddling around with my pizza dough recipe and
    > thought I might try it out.
    >
    > I have been using a combination of bread flour and durum which was
    > working really well. The "00" dough is very relaxed after it rises. It
    > does not spring back at all and produces a crust that is actually
    > crispy. It might have been just a tad too crispy though. I think if I
    > didn't roll it out as thin - it would have the better combination of
    > crispy and chewy.
    >
    > I paid $1.89 for a 2.2 pound bag, which I thought was a decent price.
    >
    > Does anyone have experience using this type of flour for pizza? I am
    > wondering if I can cut it with bread flour (or a combination of
    > wheat/and or durum) and still get the nice relaxed dough result.
    >
    > I generally put about 2 1/2 cups of flour in my food processor along
    > with 2 tsp instant yeast and a teaspoon of salt and enough warm water to
    > make a nice soft dough.


    No experience to share but if it comes out crispy, I need to try it.
    Thanks for the info!


  10. #10
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: "00" Flour - pizza

    Janet Bostwick wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > On Sat, 13 Oct 2012 11:29:23 -0700 (PDT), merryb <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > snip
    > >
    > > I see that Cash & Carry carries Mondako pizza flour- 17.98 for 50#.
    > > Mondako= Montana and Dakota wheat...Not sure if there is anything
    > > added to it, but for that price, you can make pizzas for the whole
    > > neighborhood!

    >
    > I read that bag also and couldn't find any additives listed. It's
    > interesting, but I couldn't imagine using up a quarter of that flour .
    > Janet US


    If it were a decent bread flour, I would!

    --


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