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Thread: Jelly-Jam recipes I either make or am going to some pulled from web

  1. #1
    amsweitzer is offline Assistant Cook
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    Sep 2012
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    Default Jelly-Jam recipes I either make or am going to some pulled from web

    This is the recipe for my mango-strawberry Jam

    4 1/2 c. smashed mangoes & strawberries
    2 Tbsp. lemon juice
    1 package powdered pectin
    5 1/2 c. sugar
    Combine fruit, lemon juice and pectin in a large saucepot. Bring slowly to a boil over medium heat, stirring frequently. Add sugar, stirring until dissolved. Return to a rolling boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Skim foam if necessary. Ladle hot jam into hot jars, leaving 1/4-inch headspace. Adjust two-piece lids. Process 10 minutes in water bath or 20 minutes in a 250 degree oven.
    Makes 7 half-pints


    Strawberry-Kiwi Jam
    I invented this about ten years ago cause I liked the juice combo
    3lbs Strawberries
    2lbs Kiwi
    2 packages surejell
    12 cups sugar as this is tart

    Combine fruit chopped , lemon juice and pectin in a large saucepot. Bring slowly to a boil over medium heat, stirring frequently. Add sugar, stirring until dissolved. Return to a rolling boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Skim foam if necessary. Ladle hot jam into hot jars, leaving 1/4-inch headspace. clean jar lips Put lids on Process 10 minutes in water bath
    yields 7-8 halve pint jars or exactly 6 10oz otc jars


    Watermelon Jelly
    adapted from Food in Jars
    makes about 7 eight ounce jars

    6 cups pureed watermelon (remove any seeds prior to pureeing)
    5 cups white sugar (I think next time I'd add 4 or less)
    1/2 cup bottled or fresh lemon juice
    1 packet powdered pectin

    Combine watermelon puree, sugar and lemon juice in a large, non-reactive pot. Bring to a boil and let it boil vigorously until the temperature of mixture reaches 220 degrees. Add the powdered pectin and boil for another five minutes.

    Remove from the heat and pour into clean, sterilized jars. Wipe rims, apply lids and screw on bands. Process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes.

    When time is up, remove from canner and let jars cool completely, preferably overnight. When they’re cool enough to handle, remove rings and test seals. You can eat immediately or store unopened jars in a cool, dark place for up to a year. Print up some pretty labels (I used the template from here found at this cool site) and start scheming.



    Pear Ginger Jam:
    4 cups chopped pears
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    1/3 of a cup of finely minced fresh ginger root
    1 package of pectin
    7 cups of sugar
    Put the pears into a pot and mash (or take an immersion blender to the jam after it's cooked a bit, taking care not to splash yourself). Add lemon juice and ginger; bring to a boil. Add pectin. Slowly stir in sugar. Cook until jam sheets off of the back of a spoon. Ladle into sterile jars and process (about 15 minutes for 1/2 pint jars).
    The jam tastes like a really delicious, ripe pear, but with a hint of gingery warmth. It would be great used in all the regular ways one uses jam, but I'm thinking it might also be nice used as a glaze for fish (mixed with a little tamari, maybe?). My favorite way of eating it so far is straight off the spoon.
    You might also like:

    To Make Peach Jam:

    4 cups peeled, pitted and crushed yellow peaches (3 1/2 to 4 pounds)
    1/4 cup strained fresh lemon juice
    7 1/2 cups sugar
    1/2 teaspoon unsalted butter
    1 (3 ounce) pouch liquid pectin

    In an 8 quart pan, combine the peaches and lemon juice. Stir in about half the sugar. Cover the pan and let stand for 20 minutes.

    Remove the cover. Stir in the remaining sugar and the butter. Over medium-low heat, stirring constantly, heat the mixture until the sugar is completely dissolved. Increase the heat to medium-high, and bring the mixture to a full rolling boil, stirring constantly. Boil, stirring constantly for 1 minute. Remove the pan from the heat. Skim off any foam.

    Return to the pan to the heat and bring the mixture to a full rolling boil. stir in the entire contents of the pectin pouch. Return the mixture to a full rolling boil, stirring constantly. Boil, stirring constantly, for 1 minute. Remove the pan form the heat. Skim off any foam.

    To prevent the jam from separating in the jars, allow the jam to cool 5 minutes before filling the jars. Gently stir the jam every minute or so to distribute the fruit. Ladle the hot jam into hot jars, leaving 1/4-inch headspace. Wipe the jar rims and threads with a clean, damp cloth. Cover with hot lids and apply screw rings. Process half-pint jars in a 200 degree F (93 C) water bath for 10 minutes, pint jars 15 minutes.

    NOTE: When preparing peaches, cut the fruit in quarters and remove the red fibers from the center before crushing the fruit. The fibers can be tough and stringy when cooked, and the red streaks in the jam can detract from its appearance.

    Makes about 8 half-pint jars.


    Ostruzione della Prugna - Plum Jam

    In a 8-qt pan, combine 4 1/2 cups of peeled, pitted and crushed plums with 7 1/2 cups of sugar. Cover and let stand for 20 minutes.

    Remove the cover and over medium-low heat, stirring constantly, heat the mixture until the sugar completely dissolves. Increase the heat to medium-high and bring to a boil. Boil for 2 minutes, stirring gently. Remove the pan from the heat and skim off the foam.
    Return the pan to the heat and bring to a boil; boil for 1 minute stirring constantly. Remove the pan from the heat and skim off the foam.
    Stir in 1/2 teaspoon unsalted butter and once again over medium-high heat bring the mixture to a full rolling boil, stirring constantly. Stir in an entire 3 ounce pouch of liquid pectin; return to a full boil, stirring constantly. Boil, stirring for 1 minute. Remove the pan from the heat and skim off foam. It is important to skim off the foam all three times since the plums and stirring make a lot of foam and you do not want that in your jars of jam.
    To prevent the jam separating in the jars allow the jam to cool 5 minutes before filling your hot jars. Gently stir the jam every minute or so to distribute the fruit. Ladle the hot jam into hot jars, leaving 1.4-inch headspace. Wipe the jar rims and threads with a clean, damp cloth. Cover with hot lids and apply screw rings.
    Process 1/2 pint jars in a 200 degree F water bath for 10 minutes, pint jars for 15 minutes. Cool jars on a wire rack, leaving at least 1-inch space jars for air to circulate to cool.

    The finished product with sun from the window shining on the jars.





    Homemade Gift Series #3: Caramel Apple Jam

    Here are the ingredients for the jam we made. You can basically substitute whatever jam or jelly recipe you like (in fact, we’ll probably present a second recipe later in this homemade gift series).
    6 cups apples, diced and peeled (1/8 inch cubes, roughly – this takes about three pounds of whole apples)
    1/2 cup water
    1/2 teaspoon butter
    1 package (1.75 ounces) powdered fruit pectin
    2 1/2 cups sugar
    2 1/2 cups brown sugar
    1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg

    Peeling and dicing the apples is really easy if you have an apple peeler/corer/slicer, something we found at a yard sale a few years ago for $1. You just stick the apple on it, turn the handle (easy enough my three year old daughter can do it), and the device peels the apple, removes the core, and puts a big spiral slice in that apple.
    After that, you just have to chop the apple in the opposite direction to get the nice small pieces you need for the jam.

    One thing you’ll need to do is boil the jars and lids to clean them. You can do this at any time in the process that’s convenient, as long as they’ve been boiled by the time you’re ready to put the jam in the jars.

    In a pan, combine the apples with the 1/2 cup of water and 1/2 teaspoon butter. Cook this over low heat for an hour or so, stirring regularly, until the apples are soft.
    At first, it will seem impossible that these dry-seeming apples and this little bit of water will ever combine with all of that sugar to make any kind of liquid jam. What will happen is that slowly, the apples will begin to give off liquid and, as the apples get soft, you’ll have about as much liquid as apple in the pan.

    When the apples are getting soft, you should get the boiling pot going. Put a towel on the bottom, then add water until your jars would be covered by two inches. Turn on the heat and get the water boiling!
    Once the apples are nice and soft (use your own judgment – you don’t want them to be really crisp in the jam, after all, but some soft chunks are delicious), add the pectin, stir it in, then bring the whole mix up to a rolling boil.
    Then, add the sugar. This is a fun part, because it all becomes a very thick liquid as you stir it. Bring it back to a rolling boil (and be careful here, it can splatter). Stir it constantly and let it boil for one minute.
    Remove the jam from the heat, then add the jam to the jars with a spoon until there’s a quarter of an inch between the top of the jam and the top of the jar. Clean off the rim of the jar, put a lid on it, then put a ring on top of that, turning the ring until you just begin to feel resistance. Repeat until you’re out of jam (we made six jars, with a bit left over to have immediately on toast).

    Take these closed jars and put them in the big pot of boiling water. Keep the water boiling and leave the jars in there for ten minutes, then pull them out. Put the jars on a towel with a couple inches free space around each jar. Let the jars sit for 24 hours to cool and make sure after the cooling that the lids are depressed (meaning if you push down in the middle, it doesn’t “click” – if it does, the jar needs to go). I think the poster didn't know she could either reprocess or put in the fridge
    And there you have it – wonderful jars of delicious apple jam!

  2. #2
    Jessthetipus is offline Assistant Cook
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    Default

    Hi,


    Thanks..

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