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Thread: Valtellina and Veltliner (probably for M. Pronay)

  1. #1
    Yves Guest

    Default Valtellina and Veltliner (probably for M. Pronay)

    Checking wine lists during a recent vacation in Switzerland
    (Graubünden/Grisons), I noticed that the German name for the Valtellina area
    in Lombardy is "Veltlin".

    Is there any evidence for "Grüner Veltliner" coming initially from that
    region or is it just one of those misleading names like Tokay d'Alsace or
    Portugieser? Is this grape possibly still grown in the Valtellina?

    Thanks to all (not only M. Pronay )) for coping with my curiosity...

    Yves



  2. #2
    Michael Pronay Guest

    Default Re: Valtellina and Veltliner (probably for M. Pronay)

    "Yves" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Checking wine lists during a recent vacation in Switzerland
    > (Graubünden/Grisons), I noticed that the German name for the
    > Valtellina area in Lombardy is "Veltlin".
    >
    > Is there any evidence for "Grüner Veltliner" coming initially
    > from that region


    No.

    > or is it just one of those misleading names like Tokay d'Alsace
    > or Portugieser?


    Yes.

    > Is this grape possibly still grown in the Valtellina?


    No. What the Swiss Germans call "Veltliner"
    (= [wine from] Valtellina) is always red.

    Btw, the complete parentage of Grüner Veltliner has been
    found out a few weeks ago. The mother grape, Traminer, had been
    pinned down already a few years ago, while the father was
    unknown.

    An old more or less wild rootstock in a former pasture land in
    St. Georgen, Burgenland (today part of Burgenland's capital,
    Eisenstadt) has been genetically identified as the fahther of
    Grüner Veltliner. Hans Moser, wine-grower in St. Georgen, was
    told by an old former sheperd that the grapes tasted quite sweet
    and muscaty, which would explain the former synonym of Grüner
    Veltliner, "Grünmuskateller". He convinced Ferdinand Regener
    from Klosterneuburg vitcultural school (the leading ampelographist
    in Austia) to investigate, and now it has been confirmed. The
    unknown grape was given the name of "St. Georgen". Burgenländers
    are quite proud of the fact that Burgenland has been found to be
    the home of one of GV's ancestors.

    There's an article in German on Eisenstadt's homepage:

    <http://www.eisenstadt.at/home/news/d...ater-des-gruen
    en-veltliners-entdeckt/articleBack/241.html?tx_ttnews[pointer]=2&cH
    ash=ecbbefc07b>

    or

    <http://snipurl.com/rir2o>

    The press kit says: For inquiries please contact Maximilian
    Schulyok, phone +43-676-83705712, kommunikation_eisenstadt_at
    (convert underscores to obvious special characters for mail).

    HTH a little,

    M.

  3. #3
    Michael Pronay Guest

    Default Re: Valtellina and Veltliner (probably for M. Pronay)

    Michael Pronay <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The press kit says: For inquiries please contact Maximilian
    > Schulyok, phone +43-676-83705712, kommunikation_eisenstadt_at
    > (convert underscores to obvious special characters for mail).


    I just realized that I have the press kit in my mailbox. Whoever
    wants to have it, contact me, my reply address works.

    M.

  4. #4
    Yves Guest

    Default Re: Valtellina and Veltliner (probably for M. Pronay)


    "Michael Pronay" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > "Yves" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Checking wine lists during a recent vacation in Switzerland
    >> (Graubünden/Grisons), I noticed that the German name for the
    >> Valtellina area in Lombardy is "Veltlin".
    >>
    >> Is there any evidence for "Grüner Veltliner" coming initially
    >> from that region

    >
    > No.
    >
    >> or is it just one of those misleading names like Tokay d'Alsace
    >> or Portugieser?

    >
    > Yes.
    >
    >> Is this grape possibly still grown in the Valtellina?

    >
    > No. What the Swiss Germans call "Veltliner"
    > (= [wine from] Valtellina) is always red.
    >
    > Btw, the complete parentage of Grüner Veltliner has been
    > found out a few weeks ago. The mother grape, Traminer, had been
    > pinned down already a few years ago, while the father was
    > unknown.
    >
    > An old more or less wild rootstock in a former pasture land in
    > St. Georgen, Burgenland (today part of Burgenland's capital,
    > Eisenstadt) has been genetically identified as the fahther of
    > Grüner Veltliner. Hans Moser, wine-grower in St. Georgen, was
    > told by an old former sheperd that the grapes tasted quite sweet
    > and muscaty, which would explain the former synonym of Grüner
    > Veltliner, "Grünmuskateller". He convinced Ferdinand Regener
    > from Klosterneuburg vitcultural school (the leading ampelographist
    > in Austia) to investigate, and now it has been confirmed. The
    > unknown grape was given the name of "St. Georgen". Burgenländers
    > are quite proud of the fact that Burgenland has been found to be
    > the home of one of GV's ancestors.
    >
    > There's an article in German on Eisenstadt's homepage:
    >
    > <http://www.eisenstadt.at/home/news/d...ater-des-gruen
    > en-veltliners-entdeckt/articleBack/241.html?tx_ttnews[pointer]=2&cH
    > ash=ecbbefc07b>
    >
    > or
    >
    > <http://snipurl.com/rir2o>
    >
    > The press kit says: For inquiries please contact Maximilian
    > Schulyok, phone +43-676-83705712, kommunikation_eisenstadt_at
    > (convert underscores to obvious special characters for mail).
    >
    > HTH a little,
    >
    > M.
    >


    Thanks, it was very interesting!!

    Yves



  5. #5
    Nils Gustaf Lindgren Guest

    Default Re: Valtellina and Veltliner (probably for M. Pronay)

    Next question would be why it is called Veltliner. Maybe not extremely
    interesting, but, being certified nerd, I'd like to know ...
    Cheers
    Nils



  6. #6
    Michael Pronay Guest

    Default Re: Valtellina and Veltliner (probably for M. Pronay)

    "Nils Gustaf Lindgren" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Next question would be why it is called Veltliner. Maybe not
    > extremely interesting, but, being certified nerd, I'd like to
    > know ... Cheers


    There's no stringent answer to that question yet. And I don't
    think there ever will be one.

    M.

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